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May 23, 1934 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-05-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AY, MAY,1934 TiE MICHIGAN DAILY
lltoppers Keep Supremacy ByHumbling Wolej

a

STAR*
* DUST
*-By ART CARSTENS-*
Introducing. "...
* * *
QTANDING SECURELY at the helm
' of Michigan's Board in Control
of Athletics is Henry C. Anderson,
professor in the Engineering College,
and chairman of the Board since
Ralph Aigler vent to California last
year.
As long as he remains in that posi-
tion no Michigan alumnus or student
need worry about professionalism
creeping into Wolverine athletics.
Through everything he does, whether
it be in Chicago at the Big Ten fac-
ulty meeting or in the meetings with
the Board one idea dominates -
"Will what we are planning be good
for Michigan?"
Notice it is not, "Will it be good for
Michigan athletics." Anderson's point
of view is broader than that. The
welfare of Wolverine athletics is
close to his heart but the welfare of
the University is even closer. Mich-
igan teams are .only good when, win
or lose, they maintain the prestige
and record for fair play of the Uni-
versity as a whole. -
A crusader in the interest of am-
ateur athletics Anderson went to Chi-
cago last week-end to defeat the
training table proposition and sup-
port resolutions advising Conference
coaches as to wise and unwise prac-
tices growing out of their jobs. To him
the coach, as an individuial, must
subjugate his own desires to maintain
the prestige of the school which his
teams represent.
He got what he went after. Over
the advice of the coaches, the faculty
board, pointing out the partiality that
would have to be shown football
players under the training table sys-
tem, turned down the proposal.
Then, turning-to the coaches them-
selves, the board passed three resolu-
tions - resolutions which have no
binding effect on anyone but indi-
cate the Board's standing on these
things:
1. No coach is to tutor any out-
side group.
2. No coach is to write for news-
papers during the football season.
This applies directly to weekly reviews
and predictions turned out by some
mentors. According to Professor An-
derson, radio broadcasting by coaches
during the regular season is also
frowned upon.
3. No coach is to endorse any sort
of athletic equipment. This is waived
if the coach has had a .hand in de-
veloping the equipment or making im-
provements 0 it.
Though none of these' three are
hard and fast rules it is obvious that
no coach will care to deviate from
them if the other nine schools have
such militant faculty supervision as
that furnished, by Professor Ander-
son and the Board.
One of the busiest men on the fac-
ulty, -Professor Anderson gave 45 min-
utes of his time yesterday tp a dis-
cussion of athletic policy with four
members of the fourth estate. The
wily professor called us gentlemen
right off the bat so, of course, we all
acquiesced when he asked us not to
print what he said about financial
plans for this year. The budget, as
finally approved, will be announced
sometime in June.
A story in itself would be a discus-
sion of the jobs Professor Anderson
holds. Actually, he cannot remember
them himself but needs a detailed out-
line of the various committees, sub-
committees and sub-sub-committees
of which he is a member. The total
number is 17 or 18, he cnnot renem-

ber exactly.
Six first places, twelve seconds was
the record of Michigan State college
track men during the indoor season.
The Spartans' chief accomplishment
was winning the Central intercolle-
giate championship from a fast field
at Notre Dame.
The ervice
that atisfies

Harvey Smith Named By Letternen

Brandt Limits
Michigan Nine
To Six Blows
Wistert Gets Two Out Of
Three, Including Longest
Home Run Of Year
BY BILL REED
Western State Teachers College
maintained its supremacy in Michi-
gan collegiate baseball 'circles yes-
terday at Ferry Field, defeating the
University of Michigan team, 5 to 2.
Garrett 'Lefty' Brandt, the Hill-
topper ace, held the Wolverine slug-
gers to six safeties while registering
ten strikeouts, as Whitey Wistert,
who started on the mound for Michi-
gan, and Art Patchin, who relieved
Wistert in the fourth, were being
nicked for nine fits.
The Hilltoppers opened the scor-
ing in the third when Brandt singled
with one out and was safe at second
as Paulson dropped Waterbor's throw
after Berkhousen had hit into ,what
seemed a double-play setup. Brandt
then scored on a hard hit which
Coach Ray Fisher and 14 ball
players will leave for Toledo this
afternoon, where they will engage
Toledo University in a night ball
game ,this evening at the Toledo
ball park. It will be the first
contest under the arc lights ever
played by a Michigan team, and
the only one on record in the
Big Ten. The game Will start at
8 p.m.
Ed Wilson, lanky right hander,
whose pitching on the recent road
trip was commendable, will start
in the box for the Wolverines
bounced off, Wistert's shoulder. A
screaming single over first by Frank
Secory, Hilltopper centerfielder, sent
in Berkhousen and Neuman.
Again in the fourth a Wolverine
error paved the way for a Hilltopper
score when Joe Lerner, Michigan
first baseman, dropped Wistert's
throw to catch Ed Salter, the Hill-
topper's colored outfielder, and Sal-
ter took second' to''score on a hard
hit over second by Barnabo.
The Wolverine's first tally came in
the fourth when Wistert poled one of
Brandt's 'pitches far out into deep
left center, rounding third before a
fielder had reached the ball. Secory,
matched Wistert's hit in the sixth,
however, with a circuit drive which
carried even farther than that of the
giant Wolverine.
Michigan again \ tallied in the
eighth when Russ Oliver scored from
second after an attempt by Emory,
Western State catcher, to catch Paul-
son off first was wide.
WESTERN STATE

Hoosiers Star In Conference Track Meet

-Associated. Press Photo
Charles Hornbostel and Ivan Fuqua, Indiana's crack track stars,
collected 25 points between them to help the Hoosiers take second in the
Big Ten track meet last week. Hornbostel won the mile and half mile
while Fuqua was first in the 220- and 440-yard dashes. Both are members
of the Indiana mile relay team.

AB
Berkhousen, ss ...4
Neuman, 3b......5
Miller, lb.... . 4
Secory, cf........5
Millspaugh, If.....5
Emory, c..... . 0
Salter, rf........4
Barnabo, 2b......4
Brandt, p.........3

R
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
1

H
0
2
1
2
1
0
0
2
2'

O
2;
2
7
1
0
11
2
2
0

A
2
3
0;
0
0
0
0
1
1

E
0
0
0
0
0
I-
0
1
0

WOMEN'S
SPORTS
Field Day
Kappa Kappa Gamma and the In-
dependents will meet to decide the
1934 baseball title on the diamond
at Palmer Field this afternoon at 5
p.m. The baseball finals will be part of
the Field Day program which will be
run off today at the athletic field.
The Kappas defeated Betsy Bar-
bour in the semi-finals Monday after-
noon by the close margin of 11-10.
The Independents played Kappa
Delta and won in their semi-final
game.
,Events have been scheduled for
both 4:50 and 5 p.m. Everyone par-
t cipating is asked to report at the
Field House before 4 :30 to find out
the time and events for playing, and
to register. At that time everyone will
receive a color, as competition will
be played of f on a 'basis of color
teams rather than house or group
faffiliation.
The members of the W.A.A. board
will act as officials, and faculty mem-
bers will serve as judges when neces-
sary. Margaret Arnold,'34, is student
manager for the affair, and has been
assisted by Marion McPhee, Lavinia
Creighton, Betty Cady, and Clarabelle
Neubecker.
Supper will be served by the W.A.A.
in the Field House at 6 p.m. and after
supper the new board members will be
install'ed in the annual ceremony.
Jane Arnold, the new vice-president
will be in charge of the supper.
The band concert and Lantern
Night ceremony will succeed installa-
tion of officers,

along wit hiine sqpnomore letuer win-
Cleveland Gains ners and a strong group from this
year's freshman squad are expected
On Slippgin Yanks to give the 1935 team a better record
than that chalked up by the team
The Cleveland Indians drew a step that finished third in the Big Ten
cloer o ;irs plce n te Aerianmeet last ;week-end. Smith, scored 22
closer to first place in the American points during the outdoor season
League yesterday when Lefty Lloyd being second to Ward, whose point
Brown limited the New York Yan- total was 37.
kees to three hits as the Cleveland Winners in Two Meets
team made it three in a row over Coach Hoyt's tracksters, their spiket
the leaders. The score was 5-1, and hung up for another year, won every
Brown was deprived of a shut-out indoor meet they entered but on the
victory only because of Lou Gehrig's outdoor track could get wins in bu
tenth homer of the season. two dual meets. '1nose victories were
The Washington Sen'ators took the over Ohio State and Illinois, the tean
series final from the Detroit Tigers, that scored the season's biggest upse
5-2.s Other results: when it beat out Indiana and Mich-
2 O r l igan for the Conference crown.
s American League The victories over Illinois and,.Ohio
Chicago 6, Boston 5. followed, Ward scoring .18 points ix
St. Louis 12, Philadelphia 11. the #latter meet. The last perform
National League . ance of the season took "place las
week in Evanston where the Wolver
St. Louis 7, New York 4. ines failed to win their sixteenth Con
Brooklyn 5, Chicago 4 (12 innings). ference . championship when Illinoi
Cincinnati 10, Boston 4. and Indiana walked off with most o
Pittsburgh 13, Philadelphia 4. the honors.

Totals.......34 5 9 27 7 2

MICHIGAN
ABR
A!rtz, rf.......4 0
Oliver, 3b........3 1
Petoskey, cf ..... .4 0
Paulson; 2b.....4 0.
Wistert, p, 10 .....3 1
Regeczi, if .......4 0
Waterbor, ss......3 0
Chapman, c......3 0
Lerner, lb ........1 0
Patchin, p........3 0

H
0
1
0
1
2
2
04
U0
0
0

,
1
1'
1
8
4
0
2
4
1

AE
0 0:
3 0
0 0
3 -1
10
0 0.
34 1
2 0'
0.1
4 0

Totals

. 32 , 2 6 27 16 4;

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