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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 22, 1934 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-05-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE 'MICHIGAN . DAILY

s ma w,

, S

Discovery Of Documents Lost
300 Years Made By Prof. Hyma

Miami Co-Eds Turn To
New Reducing Scheme

_ .,

II

CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY

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P. I

i

(Continued from Page 1) t
the globe was the most desired of any,.
The voyages of Columbus, Vasco Da-1
Gama, and Hudson had all been in
search of the East Indies.t
The Dutch, says Professor Hyma,1
were eventually successful. Then the
English, in hope of an island or two,1
asked for negotiations. Accordingly,
a committee headed by Grotius wast
sent to London. Upon its arrival, it
found a humorous and complex situa-
tion. The Dutch could not speak Eng-
lish, and the English could not speaki
Dutch. The only thing to do was to
write the proceedings in Latin.
Grotius was the only one who could
write Latin, continues Professor]
Hyma, and he wrote all documents.i
The importance of their discovery to1
the twentieth century is, in addition
to the fact that they explain the
Far Eastern situation of the period,
in the Auditorium of the University
High School. The program will be
presented by student teachers living
in Martha Cook dormitory. Any
member of the University communi-
ty is invited to attend.
Romance Journal Club meets at
4:15 p.m. in Room 108 R.L. The
following papers will be read:
Professor Kenyon --"A Misleadirg
Item from Sheridan's Library."
Professor McLaughlin - "A Note on
Purgatorio. Canto XI. Provenzano
Salvani."
Boulder Dam Film: The Student
Branch of the A.S.M.E. is sponsoring
the showing of The Babcock and Wil-
cox Co.'s films on the Boulder Dam
project at 7:30 p.m., Natural Science
Auditorium. The films cover both the
civil engineering features of construc-
tion and the mechanical engineering
phases concerning the installation of
machinery and equipment. The public
is invited. No charge.
Tau Beta Pi: Meeting at the Union
at 6:00 p.m. All members please be
present as this is the last meeting of
the semester.
Varsity Glee Club: Assemble in Glee
Club rooms at 7 p.m. before Campus
sing.
Christian Science Organization:
Meets at 8 o'clock this evening in
the Chapel of the Michigan League
building. All faculty and students
interested are invited to attend.
Sender Garlin, one of America's
leading journalists, will speak in the
Union at 8:00 p.m. at a meeting spon-
sored by the National Student League.
The topic: "Do You Believe What You
Read?" Admission free.
Junior Mathematical Society: The
regular-meeting at 8 p.m. in 3011 A.H.
In addition to a short mathematical
talk, election of officers for next. year
will be held.
Coming Events
Poetry Reading Contest: The an-
nual contest in the reading of poetry
given by the Interpretive Arts Society
will be held Wednesday, May 23, at 8
o'clock in the auditorium of the Uni-
versity High School.
The following students will speak:
Morton Adinoff, RuthChadwick, El-
eanor Chase, Josephine Gibson, Hu-
bert Horne, Janet Neaman, Helen
Wright.
Wri Thepublic is cordially invited to
hear this program. No admission is
charged.
Phi Eta Sigma: A meeting of all
members will be held at the Michi-
gan Union on Wednesday, May 23, at
5 o'clock. At this meeting the busi-
ness of the fraternity and the annual
election of officers will take place.
Ordnance R.O.T.C. Unit: All men

going to camp this summer will meet
at R.O.T.C. Headquarters, at 7:00
p.m. Thursday to discuss camp, means
of transportation, etc.
All-Campus Archery Meet for men
Wedntsday 4:6 p.m., Yost Field
House.
Students Interested in Modern
Dance: Doris Humphrey and Charles
Weidman will talk to all those in-
terested in the Modern Dance on
Wednesday afternoon at 3:15 in Sa-
rah Caswell Angell Hall, second floor
of Barbour Gymnasium.
Junior A.A.U.W. Drama Section:
The annual picnic will be held Wed-
nesday, May 23, at Flemings Creek,
Geddes Road.
Roussky Kroujok: Last meeting of
the semester on Wednesday, May 23,
at 8:00 in Lane Hall. Professor C. L.
Meader will speak on "The Literature
of Soviet Russia."
-Uf
,fI
4 - O'SO .41 .

that they reflect the transition of Gro-
tius' views on various questions that
lead up to his two famous books; "Free
Seas," and "Law of War and Peace,"
upon which are based nearly all reg-
ulations of modern international law.
The documents consist of 38 folio
pages, says Professor Hyma, in con-
cluding his dramatic tale, on which
are written first the arguments of
one side and then the other.
Professor Hyma did all his work
from Ann Arbor, having all the docu-
ments in the English archives photo-
stated. A University grant made this
possible.
Professor Hyma's discovery, which
he plans to publish as soon as he fin-
ishes the translation, is called by his-.
torians the world over, one of the
startling discoveries of the age. In the
words of Professor Hyma himself,
"throwing light on an important con-
troversial question as it does, it is, I
believe, my outstanding contribution
to history."
Japan Cab inet
Members Fear
Murder Threat
Fifteen Governmnent Men
Are Involved InI Huge
Financial Scandal
TOKIO, May 21.--(P)-Armed
guards were assigned today to protect
the lives of Japanese cabinet members
amid fears of terrorism created by the
government financial scandal.
Additional arrests brought to 15 the
number, headed by Kideo Kuroda, vice
minister of finance, now held on
charges of corrupt financial practices.
Five finance ministry officials were
among them.
The precautionary measures were
invoked in the fear ultra-patriotic or-
ganizations would seize the cabinet's
difficulties for a campaign of terror-
ism.
Premier Saito was watched over by
an especially heavy guard.
In addition, orders went out from
the home ministry -in charge of
maintaining the public peace - for
prefectoral governors to make any
precautions believed necessary in their
areas.
It may be a month before the cab-
inet decides whether to resign as a
result of the scandal, according to the
consensus of vernacular newspapers.
If developments indicate Kuroda and
his associates are guilty, the ministry
is expected to quit.
Rapid-moving political develop-
ments indicated rival leaders were
preparing for the crash, should it de-
velop. Word that Gen. Kazunari
Ugaki, governor general of Korea and
long-time aspirant to premiership, is
coming to Tokio aroused comment.
Another powerful element favors
former Premier Count Keigo Ki-
Youra for the premiershipshould the
Saito ministry resign.
Leta Musgrave To Give
Recital This Afternoon
Leta Musgrave, pupil of Prof. Pal-
mer Christian, will present a public
organ recital at 4:15 p.m. today in Hill
Auditorium. The public, with the ex-
ception of small children, is invited.
Miss Musgrave will present two
numbers from Bach, greatest of organ
music' composers. She will also be
heard in a Karg-Elert number, as well
as numbers by Bingham, Schmitt, and
Widor.
Two other organ recitals will con-
clude the spring series within a week.
On Thursday, Allan Callahan, '33SM,
director of music and organist at the

Zion Lutheran Church, will offer a
program, while on May 29, Achilles
Taliaferro, music director at the First
Methodist Episcopal Church, will be
heard.
L EA R N
TO DANCE
Social Dancing taught
daily. Terrace Garden
ancing Studio. Wuerth
Theatre Bldg. Ph. 9695

OXFORD, O., May 21.-(IP)-A
10-cent piece of rope and the ingenu-
ity of Helen Knight, a Miami Univer-
sity student, has started co-eds at the
university on their way to the perfect
girlish figures.
Early in the morning and after
every meal, scores of the co-eds can
be seen skipping pounds away on
Oxford's board walks.
Miss Knight, known here for her
trim figure, has found that nothing is
better for improving one's form than
skipping rope several minutes a day
Librarian Declares
That Classics ilave
Been Best Sellers
WASHINGTON, May 21. -(IP)-
"A classic is a book that one ought to
read but doesn't unless compelled to
by outside pressure."
This common statement is an error,
according to Dr. George F. Bower-
man, librarian of the Public Library,
who asserts that the classics have
been the best sellers through the
years.
"Quo Vadis," a religious novel of
Rome in Nero's day, by the Polish
author, Sienkiewicz, he says, has been
the 'best seller since 1896.
Moreover, Dr. Bowerman asserts,
"Pilgrim's Progress," "Robinson Cru-
soc," "Vanity Fair," and "Lorna
*Doane," all classics, have been best
sellers according to long-time rec-
ords, while the supposedly popular
"Three Weeks," by Elinor Glyn, has
not been so classed.
Through advertisement, he said,
' many books become best sellers for
short periods of time. Of 200 best
sellers ill the last 37 years, Dr. Bower-
man asserts, only 22 authors have
been credited with more than two
each. However, he says, of the ten
books by Winston Churchill, nine
have been best sellers.
Begin Classification
Sept. 20th N.'ext Year
Classification in the College of Lit-
erature, Science, and the Arts, the
I College of Architecture, the School of
Education, the School of Music, and
the School of Forestry for the regular
school year 1934-35 will begin on
Thursday, Sept. 20 and will continue
through Friday and Saturday morn-
ing of the same week, it was an-
nounced yesterday by Dr. Daniel Rich,
director of registration. The process
of classification will be carried on in
Waterman and Barbour Gymnasiums
under the same system as was em-
ployed last fall.
As is customary this time of year,
applications for admission from pros-,
pective freshmen are being receivedl
by the registrar's office. The number'
of freshman appications for all
schools of the University on May 15
was 663, but the number has been ma-
terially increased since.
Siiiia R ho Tau To Hold
Detroit Debate May 26
Sigma Rho Tau', Engineering Stump
Speakers' Society, will journey to De-
troit for the last intercollegiate de-
bate of the season. The debate will
be held with the Detroit Institute of
Technology Saturday, May 26, on the
subject, "Resolved: That The Federal
Government Should Own and Operate
All Air Mail Planes."
The local team will uphold the af-
firmative side, being composed of S. M.
'Ferman, '34E, Eric E. Sommer, 35E,
A. E. Cleveland, '35E, and R. L. Gil-
'lilan, '34E. Cleveland is taking the
place. of Albert J. Stone, '34E, who
is in the Health Service. The regular
conference system of debate will be
used.

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Phone 2-1214. Place advertisements with
Classified Advertising Department.
The classified columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertions.
Box Numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in Advance-11c per reading line
(on basis of flv; average words to
Ihie) for one or two Insertions.
10c per reading line fur three or more
insertions.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
TelephonetRate--15c per reading line for
one or two Insertions.
14c per reading line for three or more
Insertions.
10% discount If paid within ten days
from the date or last insertion.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
By Contract, per line--2 lines daily, one
month...... ............8c
4 lines E.O.D.. 2 months......e
2 lines daily, college year .......7c
4 lines E. O. D., college year ....7c
100 lines used as desired. 9c
300 lines used as desired........8c
1,000 lines used as desired...7Ic
2,000 lines used as desired...6c
The above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per inch of
71/ point Ionic type, upper &nd lower
case. Add 6c per line to above rates for
all capital letters. Add Oc per line to
above for bold face, upper and lower
case. Add 10 per line to above rates for
bold face capital letters.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Cameo brooch. 411 E. Wash-
ington or call 2-2057. Reward.

WANTE16
WANTED: MEN'S OLD AND NEW
suits. Will pay 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 dol-
lars. Phone Ann Arbor 4306. Chi-
cago Buyers. Temporary office, 200
North Main. 5x
WANTED: A position with either a
fraternity or sorority by a profes-
sional experienced cook. Former
ateress. References. Phone 2-2945.
466
LAUNDRY
PERSONAL laundry service. We take
individual interest in the 1!aundry
problem of our customers. Girls'
silks, wools, and fine fabrics guar-
anteed. Men's shirts our specialty.
Call for and deliver. 2-3478, 5594.
611 E. Hoover. 9x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 4x
TAXICABS
ARCADE CAB. Dial 6116. Large com-
fortable cabs. Standard rates. 2x

FOR RENT
FOUR-ROOM furnished apartment.
Frigidaire,'laundry privileges. Stu-
dio couch. Phone 3403. 467

.I

Prospective Freshmen Grouped
As To Proba ble Success Here

The registrar's office is again buzz-
ing with activity as hundreds of ap-
plications are flowing in for next
year's freshmen. The question often
arises, just what the office does with
all the information received. In an
intreview with Elizabeth Lawrie, stat-
istician in the registrar's office, some
of the purposes were disclosed.
All freshmen are divided into three
groups according to the information
contained in the application blanks,
in an effort to predict their success in
college work. These groups are des-
ignated A-1, A-2, and A-3. It is ex-
pected that students in the A-1 group
will do well in the university; that;
students in the A-2 group will at
least do average work, and that the
A-3 group may have some scholastic
difficulties.
This classification is based on the
size of school; individual subject
grades; principals' rating of the stu-
dent; rank in the high school gradu-
ating class; student's age, and other
relevant material.
In the Engineering College the A-1
group earned 51.8% of all the A
grades, and only 1.9% of all the E
grades. The A-2 group earned 39%
of the A grades and 10,4% E's, and
in the A-3 group 9.1% of the A grades
were received and 87.7% of the E's.
In all, the two groups predicted to do
good work at the university received
90.8% of the A grades and 12.3% of
the E grades.
In the literary colloge 63.3% of the
A grades were received by the A-1
group and but 2.1% of the E grades.

The A-2 group received 29.6% of all
the A grades and 19.5% of the E's,
while the A-3 group made 7.1% of all
the A grades and 78.4% of the E's.
Again, these figures show the two up-
per groups made 92.9% of the. A
grades and 21.6% of all the E grades.
The 1933-34 class, when compared
with the class of 1932-33, shows prac-
tically the same percentage of various
grades, although this year's class had
an increase in the number of stu-
dents.
ALUMNI WILL PICNIC
The Dade City, Fla. University of
Michigan Club will have a 'picnic in
Dade City May 23 for all University
Alumni in central Florida.
E-U-R-O-P-E
Round Trip 3rd Class Tourist
ENGLAND .......$144.50 $188.00
FRANCE ...........$149.50 $190.00
GERMANY ..........$161.00 $200.00
ITALY........$182.50 $240.00
Other classes quoted free.
Tours and Cruises advertised anywhere.
53 days, 6 countries, $528 3rd, $98 tourist.
88 days, 6 countries. $378 3rd, $447 tourist.
Passion Play included. From New York on
steamers'where tourist is the first class
on ship.
D. & C. to Cleveland and Buffalo.
Phone your order Tickets delivered
No extra charges ever
KUEBLER TRAVEL BUREAU
Bonded for Your Protection since 1917
Ask Your Local Banker
OFFICIAL Local Agency
for All Lines, Tours and Cruises
601 E. Huron St. Ph. 6412

A-

THE JOHN MARSHALL
LAW SCHOOL
Thirty-fifth Year - An Accredited Law School
Evening Law School with Day School Standards

COURSES LEAD TO LL.B.
Text and Case Method

AND J.D. DEGREES
Moot Court Practice

FACULTY

li

r'

GEORGE F. ANDERSON
(LL.B., N. W. University)
ARTHUR M. BARN HART
(A.B., Princeton; LL.B., I9rvard)
HERBERT BEB
(A.B., U. of Ill.; J.D., U. of Chicago)
CHARLES CENTER CASE
(LL.B., N. W. University)
MORTON S. CRESSY
(A.B., Yale; LL.B., Harvard)
WALTER F. DODD
(Ph.D., U. of Chicago)
PALMER D. EDMUNDS
(A.B. Knox; LL.B., Harvard)
REUBEN FREEDMAN
(A.B., U. of Manchester)
WALTER D. FREYBURGER
(Ph.B., J.D., U. of Chicago)
GEORGE E. HARBERT
(LL.B., Notre Dame University)
HOWARD M. HARPEL .
(A.B., Dickinson College)
EDWARD B. HAYES
(A.B., Ill.; LL.B., Harvard)

LLOYD D. HETH
(A.B., Beloit College)
NOBLE W. LEE
(A.B., Harvard)
ROBERT McMURDY
(LL.M., U. of Michigan)
THOMAS J. NORTON
(LL.D., Knox College; LL.B., Kas.)
ELBRIDGE BANCROFT PIERCE
(A.B., Amherst; LL.B., Harvard)
HON. GEORGE FRED RUSH
(A.M., U. of Michigan)
LEWIS A. STEBBINS
HAhOLD G. TOWNSEND
(A.B., Beloit; LL.B., Harvard)
THORLEY VON HOLST
(LL.B., Valparaiso University)
ALBERT E. WILSON
(A.B., Hobart College)
VICTOR S. YARROS
(LL.B., N.Y.U. Law School)

A

Bright Spot
802 Packard Street
TURKEY or
CHICKEN DINNER
50c
12 NOON TO 8 P.M.

I

Catalog and Pamphlet on "The Study of Law and Proper Preparation" Sent Free
EDWARD T. LEE, Dean, 311 Plymouth Court, Chicago
I -- I

ENDS
TONIGHT

ENDS
MAJESTIC. TONIGHT
SomethingDoing Every Minute

r
I
i
k
t
R
t
!,

iMCHIGAN
The whole hia-rious Circus
of Radioon Parade plus Dick Powell
and Ginger Rogers ...
"20. MILLION
SWEETHEARTS"
THE FOUR MILLS BROTHERS
THREE RADIO ROGUES

It's a Circus

.k

I I

I11 >' f.' X 1 / Il £f'. '^. \ Y LI4 AT'F F I

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