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May 11, 1934 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1934-05-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY MA'

[HE MICHIGAN DAILY

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, me4Tsg orf lk' V -r - -.------
Pou'nshed every morning except Monday -during thef
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
arouatd Q eoU _ ____}i
-= {33 (ia1Iv,aL ,, .- C6VE~)134
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESSj
The Associated Press is enclusively entitled to the use,
ffr republication of all news dispathces credited to it or
not otherwise credited in thi3 paper and the local newsj
published herein. All rights of republication of speciall
dispfatches are reserved."
Enteredsat thes Post.Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, a
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
third Aistant Postmaster-General.t
SGbscrption during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail.
$1.50. During regula school gear by carrier, $3.75; by
mail, $4.25. .
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.l
Representatives: College Publications Representatives
inc., 4C East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylson Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR ..........THOMAS X. CONNELLAN
CITY EDITOR........................BaACKLY SHAW
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR............C. HART SCHAAF
SPORTS EDITOR................... ALBERT H. NEWMAN
WOMEN'S EDITOR.....................CAROL J. HANAN
NIGHT EDITORS: A. Ellis Ball,. Ralph G. Coulter. William
G. Ferris, John C, Healey, GeorgeVan Vleck, E. Jerome
Pettit.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Arthur W. Car-
stens, Roland L. Martin, Marjorie Western.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Beck, Eleanor Blum,
Los Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan.
REPORTERS: C. Bradford Carpenter, Paul J. Elliott,
Courtney A. Evans, John J. Flaherty, Thomas A. Groehn
John Kerr, Thomas H. Kleene, Bernard B. Levick, David
0. MacDonald, Joel P. Newman, John M. O'Connell,
Kenneth Parker, William R. Reed, Robert S. Ruwitch,
Arthur S. Settle, Jacob C. Seidel, Marshall D. Silverman,
Arthur M. Taub.
Dorothy Glee, Jean Hanmer, Florence Harper. Eleanor
Johnson, Ruth Loebs, JosephineMcLean, Marjorie Mor-
rison, Sally Place, Rosalie Resnick, Jane Schneider.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-124
.BUSINESS MANAGER.............W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER ............BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
WO4EN'S BUSINESS MANAGER ............... ...
.........................,....., CATHARINE MC HENRY
bEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Noel Tur-
ner; Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Service, Robert Ward; Accounts, Alen Knuusi; Circula-.
tion and Contracts, Jack Efroymson.
ASSISTANTS: Milton Kramer, John Ogden, Bernard Ros-
enthal, Joe Rothbard, George Atherton.
Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell, Mary Bursley, Peggy Cady,
Virginia Cluff,° Patricia Daly, Genevieve Field, Louise
Flopez, Doris Gimmy, Betty Greve, Bilie Griffiths, Janet
Jackson, Louise Krause, Barbara Morgan, Margaret
Mustard, Betty Simondb.
FRESHMAN TRYOUTS: William Jackson, Louis Gold-
smith, David Schiffer, William Barndt, Jack Richardson,
1,Arles Parker, Roadrt Owen, Ted Wohlgemuth, Jerome
Grosnan, Avncr, Kronenberger, Jim Horiskey, Tom
Cla e, Scqtt, Samue Beckman, Homer Lathrp, Hall,
Ross ev'1n, Willy Tomnlison, Dean Asselin, Lyman
Bittman, John Park, Don Hutton, Allen TUlpson, Richard
F ardezibroOfl, Gordon Cohn. ,
NIGHT EDITOR: WILLIAM G. FERRIS
If Student
Graded Teachers.. ..
WHEN THE UNIVERSITY loses near-
ly2,000 students by graduation this
June, some attempt ought to be made to get the
frank opinions of these men and women, most of
whom have spent four years here, as to what they
think would improve the University.
It is nearly impossible to go through four years
of active mental exercise without having a defi-
nite thought as to something here or there that
might be improved in the present set-up. While
much of the criticism would be founded on preju-
dice or half-baked thinking, there would, we be-
lieve, be a considerable amount of valuable changes
recommended.
The student sees the University in an entirely
different light from the professor. While his com-
ments, from a scholarly point of view might be
less worthy of consideration than those of the
faculty themselves, the student would have the
advantage that he is more intimately connected
with the problems which his immediate successors
are facing, The professor, although he may have
years of teaching experience behind him necessarily
has not faced the problems of the student himself
for several years.
Conservative members of the faculty will wince
at the thought of too close a contact between the
administration and the students, believing that
such contacts would tend to weaken the prestige
of the faculty, since they might then feel dependent
upon student popularity for their positions - an
intolerable situation.

The answer to the objection is that student
reports would have to be considered for what they
are, and that while popularity with students should
not be given precedence over teaching ability, it is
often a good indicator of it, merely because it is
easier to learn from a likable teacher. Furthermore,
it is not to be supposed that every senior who has
received a poor grade from an instructor would take
the opportunity to get back at him for it. Such
criticisms could be spotted and discounted.
The criticisms might be given to a committee
under the President, and the wheat sifted from
the chaff. Good suggestions would find their way
into investigations and, finally, if approved, into
reforms.
Loyalty to the University is better served by
careful criticism than by dumb allegiance. Im-
provement and reform are necessary if the Univer-
sity is to grow with the times..
It would be perhaps too difficult for the adminis-
tration to send official questionnaires to all grad-
uating students; but if this cannot be done, then

Screen Reflections
AT THE MAJESTIC
C "BLOOD MONEY"
Bill Bailey .............George Bancroft
Elaine Talbert ........... .Frances Dee
Ruby Darling. ......... Judith Anderson
The latest Schenk-Zanuck 20th Century produc-
tion has some difficulty in getting to the average
entertainment level, but thanks to Miss Dee's hard
work it manages to make it. In this latest of Ban-
croft vehicles, the star is once again the friend
and behind-the-scene influence of the underworld
and its colleague, the political ring. Acting in the
capacity of a bond salesman, Bill Bailey is the
friend of the crook in need as well as playing big
brother to poor little society-bored debutantes
who want excitement. Elaine is one of these, only
she has the bug much worse than any of her
friends. As a matter of fact she is a kleptomaniac
whose hobby is to go shop-lifting for the thrill of
it. And when little bad girl meets big bad bank
robber, it's a case of love at first sight. And she
does all the looking. Bill goes bail for this crook,
only to have him skip out on him. He gets in bad
with the underworld by having the crook arrested,
and his life is threatened. Comes the dawn, the
rescue, the denouement, and the end of the film.
As mentioned before, Miss Dee's portrayal is the
only commendable one of the lot. Watch her rise to
success. Her work in "Little Women," "Coming Out
Party," and now in "Blood Money" marks her as
an actress of that rare quality, sincerity.
-J.C S.

The Theatre
THE PSYCHOLOGY FANS, the literary folk, and
those garden variety of playgoers who want
just good entertainment will all be catered to
when the Ann Arbor dramatic festival opens with
Alfred Sangster's "The Brontes" at the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre next Monday night, May 14. The
play will continue for seven performances. It is the
first of the series of five plays in the festival.
The play, newly named "Charlotte, Emily and
nne" because of the more advantageous listing in
the alphabetically arranged New York newspapers'
theatre columns, comes to Ann Arbor after a week
of near capacity audiences at the historic Pabst
Theatre in Milwaukee. (The theatre seats 1,600.)
The original production rai for 305 performances
in London.
This is said to be the first time that Ann Arbor
has had virtually an Ane'ican pireniere of a play
with the same cast that will b, seen by Ntvv York
later.
This Bronte play vividly re-creates the atmos--
phere in the Yorkshire parsonage where the
preacher father tyrannically dominated his daugh -
ters and prayed over his worthless son. It shows
Emily Bronte, the genius who wrote "Wiithering
Heights," in bitter conflict with her father, re-
belling against his domination and demanding the
right to live her own life.
Contrasted with the in-growing personality of
Emily who could not bear that others should even
read her writings, is the personality of Charlotte
Bronte, a plain little person, timid, fastidious, af-
fectionate, eager to reach out amd share her love.
It is not surprising that she, who had grown
up motherless in the forbidding parsonage on tlthe
moors should adore Belgian M. Heger, the youni
man with whom she and Emily study when finally
they open a school of their own.
It is mouse-like Charlotte, all eyes and eagerness,
who wrote "Jane Eyre," the book that rocked Vic-
torian England. And it was plain little Charlotte
who persuaded her cold, forbidding, strange elder
sister to publish her poems and novels - although
Emily who had poured out her soul in Ihem pro-
tested that she Would die if the world should read
them.
Ann Arbor will see Violet Kemble-Cooper, dis-
tinguished Theatre Guild actress as Emily; Eliza-
beth Risdon, also a leading Guild player as Char-
lotte; Francis Compton, a favorite here, as the
Rev. Bronte and Robert Henderson, the festival's
director, as Branwell Bronte.

WATLJNG, LERCHEN
& HAYES
Members
New York Stock Exchange
New York Curb (Associate)
Detroit Stock Exchange
ACCOUNTS CARRIED
ON MARGIN
0
Investment Analysis
Statistical Information
Government, Municipal &
Corporation Bonds
Unlisted Stocks
Inquiries Invited
3a:4 Buhl Bldg, Detroit
Ant Arbor T'ust ctg., Ann Arbor
A-A 2-3221

___

FESTIVAL
MAY 10, 11, 12,

MAY

AT THE MICHIGAN

C

"THE POOR RICH". On the Screen

Albert .......... Edward Everett Horton
Harriet..............Edna May Oliver
Andy Devine, Thelma Todd, Leila Hyams
"ALL GIRL REVIEW" On the Stage
Boyle Woolfolk's "All Girl Review" lives up to
its reputation as a fast, breezy, amusing stage
presentation. There is some talent in the gang's
roster of thirty-five; and where that element is
missing there is substitution of pep and enthusiasm
that more than compensates. Informally staged
and nicely clad, this tabloid musical review has
everything in it. The four Albee Sisters blend their
voices in some pleasing harmony in addition to
going in for a bit. of burlesque. The two Dawn
sisters are clever comedians and stopped the show
with their comedy pantomiming. Mistress of cere-
monies, Maria Paris, introduces the acts anddoes
it with a minimum of words. Another thng to be
thankful for. Dell O'Dell has the audiences doubled
up most of the time with her pseudo-magic. And
the feature dancer, ElaineaManzi, skilfully toe
dances her way into the hearts of the audience.
Of course one can't forget the hard-working chorus
who execute many routines of merit. This show is
all comedy, and for once they led our famed-
razzing-audience on a leash. They actually made
the customers behave.
On the screen is "The Poor Rich," a delightful
comedy that glorifies a one-reel-comedy idea into
a full-length picture but gets away with it. The
combination of Mr. Horton with Miss Oliver is a
happy one. Don't worry about the story. That is
just incidental. Poor people trying to give the im-
pression of wealth is its theme. Take all these
comedians, Horton, Oliver, Devine, Todd, Hyams,
and Grant Mitchell, mix them up. Shake well and
serve for about an hour, and you have a non-
sensical concoction that will tickle your ribs. It is
always good for a laugh. But that's as far as it
goes. The screen play was directed by that veteran
comedy director, Edward Sedgwick, from an orig-
inal story by Ebba Havez and Dale Van Every. To
summarize: it is an all-comedy show that offers
plenty of laughs to the classroom weary college
student. -J.C.S.

Let's say
something
about
women and
Drewrys
Ate
Women seem to prefer it to beer,
because Drewrys' taste is mild
instead of bitter.
They also prefer to serve it in-
stead of highballs when there are
men in the party because Drewrys
has all of the kick of a highball
without any of the kick-back.
And that's very important
in making a high-spot evening
with a mixed crowd. Drewrys,
in spite of its mild taste, has
plenty of authority. Don't worry
about that.
DR E RYS
THE DREWRYS LTD., U.S.A.
180 N. Michigan Avenue, Chicago
NOW BREWED IN THE U. S. A:

LUCREZIA BORT.....Soprano
ROSA PONSELLE .. ....Soprano
JEANNETTE VIEELAND.. .
... ..... ....... Soprano
COE GLADE ........Contralto
PAUL AL''IiOUSE.....Tenor
ARTIUR HACKETT ...Tenor

THEODORE WEBB.. Baritone
CZA8E BAROMEO...... Bass
GUILA BUSTABO. .. .Violinist
MISCHA LEVITZKI. . .Pianist
MABEL ROSS RHEAD......
-.-. -.-.-. Accompanist
PALMER CHRISTIAN Organist

t
3
7

Collegiate Observer
By BUD BERNARD
A.J.S., '34E sent me in the following contri-
bution.
TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO: A sophomore
literary student in the University while walk-
ing along State Street and paying no particular
heed to where he was going, found himself
dropping through a manhole, the lid of which
was off to permit dumping in a load of coal.
He emerged looking anything but clean, and in
spite of a sprained wrist, laughed as he saw the
humorous side of it.
I'll bet he was walking up from Division
Street.
The president of Rollins College believes that
play should be as important a part of a student's
life as work. Classes at the college are over at 3:30
p.m. and no outside assignments are made by the
faculty.

rgan izanions
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION ...................30 Voices
THE CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA... .......70 Players
YOUNG PEOPLE'S FESTIVAL CHORUS..............400 Voices
THEl STAINr E Y (TjO1rU , 7S ................... ....... .Women
SONG OF PEACE (Ein Friedenslied) ................ .. Robert Heger
NINTH SYMPHONY............................Beethoven
THE SEASONS..................................... Haydn
THE UGLY DUCKLING ....................... . English
BY THE RUINS OF BABYLON.....................Loeffler
Conductors
EARL V. MOORE............. . ... .......Musical 'irector
FREDERICK STOCK.... ... ... ......Orchestra Conductor
ERIC DeLAMARTER .... .......... . Associate Conductor
JUVA HIGBEE ............Young People's Conductor
111. FRIDAY AFTERNOON, 2:30

10

GUILA BUSTABO, Violinist
YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS
STANLEY CHORUS

ERIC DE LAMARTER and
JUVA HIGBEE, Conductors

* * *

*

Musical Events
TWO CONCERTS TODAY
Afternoon:
Guila Bustabo, violinist
Young People's Chorus, Juva
Highee, director
Stanley Chorus, Margaret Martindale,
Chicago Symphony Orchestra,
DeLamarter
Evening:
Lucrezia Boi, soprano
Chicago Symphony Orchestra,
Frederick Stock, conductor
SECOND FESTIVAL CONCERT
In Review
THE GREAT SPECTACLE about the May Fes-
tival is the massing of Choral Union on the
stage, with its pied color on both sides of a stripe of
black, the orchestra gathered together, waiting
for the appearance on the stage of the artists and
conductor. If Choral Union were as spectacular to
the ear, even as Levitski is, it would have been a
large evening. As it was, the soloists carried the
laurels away with them. Perhaps because it was
the initial performance, perhaps because Haydn
is treacherous stuff to do en masse, the chorus did
not do as well as it might have. The balance be-
tween choirs was uneven, the altos being most re-
liable; attacks were somewhat slow. Only occa-
sionally was the orchestra slightly overpowering.
There were good spots, of course, in climaxes. "Hail,
O Glorious Sun," and "Hark! the Mountains Re-
sound," the women's united voices in "Let the
Wheel Move Gaily" and the grand "Amen," re-
deemed the efforts of the chorus. Jeanette Vree-
land, as Jane, was utterly charming, with her ex-
quisite voice, and precise singing: "O How Pleas-
ing to the Senses," the recitative, "Ye Swains," her

Fraternities at Union College recently held a
"dirt throwing" party. All the fraternities rep-
resented had large signs painted on which
appeared such remarks as "If you're a drunk-
ard join the D.U.'s," and "If you can't go
fraternity, go Pi Lamb."
* * * *
A new post has been started at Johns Hopkins
University by professors who were somehow af-
fected by rows of serenely sleeping undergraduates.
An official "waker-upper" now patrols the aisles of
the lecture rooms, prodding drowsy students in the
ribs.
* * * *
John Dillnger is truly u jailbird, says the Syra-
cuse Daily Oran ge; he ha s given all the jails in the
country the bird.
* * * *

Here's the predicament of a
the University of Maryland:
'a love a lass
I love a miss
Who will not pass
A guy a kiss.
I love alas

poor fellow at

I love amiss!"
* * *

*

Some men achieve fame by saying a bookful in
two or three sentences, while others accomplish the
same feat by talking beautifully for hours without
saying a word.
-Daily O'Collegian.
* * * *
Only a little over three weeks left in which to
have a good time, so let's not worry. However,
there is one thing these smart professors can-
not ask, says a junior at the University of Ok-
lahoma, and that's which way will a pickle
squirt when you bite it?
balance of the trio. The horns in the Autumn
Chorus added warmth and beau geste to the sec-
tion.
Levitzki's concerto is perhaps an ideal example of
what constitutes a concerto. Made up as it is of
absolutely pianistic passage-work, singing melodies,
no intrusive orchestra, only background, seemingly
subtle under Stock's direction, the Saint-Saens G-

LIGHT food is the kind that
will keep the brain in action.
So start the day with
Kellogg's Rice Krispies.
Those crisp, crunchy rice
bubbles with milk or cream
appeal to the taste and fur.
nish energy you need.
Rice Krispies at lunch are
also ideal. Won't bog you
down. And at the end of the
day - when hungry and
tired-Rice Krispies satisfy
the -appetite and promote
sound sleep.
Ask for Kellogg's Rice
Krispies at your campus
restaurant, fraternity house
or eating club. Made by
Kellogg in Battle Creek.
Listen -
&jt4w

Allegro from Concerta No. 2 in F major for Trumpet and
Strings ("Brandenberg") ............................... .....Bach
Songs:
On Wings of Song ..................................Mendelssohn
Hedge Roses ....................... .... .Schubert
Blue Danube Wait.... . ...................J. Strauss
YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS
Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso for violin and Orchestra,
Op. 28 .................................... .. .........Saint-Saens
GUILA BUSTABO
Cantata, "The Ugly Duckling"..........................English
YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS
First Symphony..................................... .Milhaud
By the Waters of Babylon . . ...................Loeffler
THE STANLEY CHORUS
Andante and Rondo-Allegro from "Symphony Espagnole"
for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 21 .................... ....Lalo
MISS BUSTABO
IV. FRIDAY EVENING, 8:15
LUCREZIA BORI, Soprano
CHICAGO SYPMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
Fantasle, "A Night on a Bare Mountain"............Moussorgsky
Aria, "Vol che sapete"........................... .......Mozart
LUCREZIA BORI
Symphony No. 4 in E minor, Op. 98........................Brahms
Recitative and Aria of Lia ("L'Enfant Prodigue")..........Debussy
MISS BORI
"Sailor's Dance" ("Pavot Rouge").... ......... ....... ....Gliere
Aria, "Depuis le ,lour" ("Louri fse".) ................... . .Charpentier
MISs BORI
V. SATURDAY AFTERNOON, 2:30
JEANNETTE VREELAND, Soprano THEODORE WEBB, Bass
COE GLADE, Contralto UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
ARTHUR HACKETT, Tenor CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Con4uctor
Overture to "Cariolanus," Op. 62 .......................Beethoven
Symphony No. 9, in D minor, Op. 125 .................. ....Beethoven
MISS VREELAND, MISS GLADE, MR. HACKETT, AND MR. WEBB
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
Tone Poem, "Ein Heldenleben," Op. 40...... ............Strauss
The Hero
The Hero's Adversaries
The Hero's Companion
The Hero's Battlefield
The Hero's Mission of Peace
The Hero's Escape from the World - Conclusion
VI. SATURDAY EVENING, 8:15
JEANNETTE VREELAND, Soprano CHASE BAROMEO, Bass
COE GLADE, Contralto - PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organist
PAUL ALTHOUSE, Tenor UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, EARL V. MOORE, Conductor
A Song-5f Peace ("Ein Friedenslied") ..........................Heger

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