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May 11, 1934 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-05-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILYFI

)AILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of the
Iniversity. Copy received at the ofce of the Assistant to the President until
3:30; 11:30 a.m. ,.Saturday.

Planes And Pilot Who WillOpen Transatlantic Season

CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY

FRIDAY, MAY 11, 1934
VOL. XLIV No. 160

Notices
President and Mrs. Ruthven will be
at home to members of the faculties
and other residents of Ann Arbor on,
Sunday, May 13, from 4 to 6 o'clock.
To the Members of the University
Council: The next meeting of the
U7niversity Council will be held on
Monday, May 14, at 4:15 p.m. in Room'
1009 Angell Hall.
Louis A. Hopkins, Secy.
Special Faculty Meeting, College of
Literature, Science, and the Arts: The
Faculty will meet in Room 1025, An-
gell Hall, Tuesday, May 15, at 4:10
o'clock, for the consideration of the
Special Order on Entrance Require-
ments. Because of the importance
of this special order, every member of
the Faculty is urged to be present.
Forestry Students: All students ex-
pecting to attend Camp Filibert Roth
this summer will please meet in Room
2039 N. S. Building, Friday, May 11,
at 5:00 p.m.
Robert Craig, Jr., Director
Academic Notices
Economics 52: The examination on
Monday, May 14, at 2 p.m. will be
given in the following rooms:
Mr. Horner's and Mr. Palmer's sec-
tions -N. S. Aud.
Mr. Mott's sections - 101 Ec.
Mr. Orr's sections - 231 A. H.
Lectures
Mr. C. B. DeVlieg, President of De-
Vlieg Milling Machine Company, will
lecture on machine design in room
1300 East Engineering building on
Friday at 10 a.m. All interested are
invited to attend this lecture.
Concerts
1May Festival Programs:
The Third May Festival concert will
take place this afternoon at" 2:30.
The program is as follows:
Guila Bustabo, Violinist.
Young People's Chorus.
Stanley Chorus.
Eric DeLamarter and
Juva Higbee, Conductors.
Allegro from Concerto No. 2 in
F major for Trumpet and
Strings ("Brandenberg") ...Bach
Songs
On Wings of Song ... Mendelssohn
Hedge Roses ...........Schubert
Blue|Danube Waltz . . ...J. Strauss
Young People's Chorus
Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso
for Violin and Orchestra,

Op. 28 ............... Saint-Saens
Guila Bustabo
Cantata "The Ugly Duckling" English
Young People's Chorus
First Symphony ........... Milhaud
By the Waters of Babylon ...Loeffler
The Stanley Chorus
Andante and Rondo - Allegro from
"Symphonie Espagnole" for
Violin and Orchestra,
Op. 21....................La
Miss Bustabo
The Fourth May Festival concert
will take place this evennig at 8:15.
The program is as follows:
Lucrezia Bori, Soprano.
Chicago Symphony Orchestra.
Frederick Stock, Conductor
Fantasie, "A Night on a
Bare Mountain" ......Moussorgsky
Aria, "Voi che sapete"........Mozart
Lucrezia Bori
Symphony No. 4 in E minor,
Op. 98................Brahms
Allegro non troppo
Andante moderato
Allegro giocoso
Allegro energico e passionato
Recitative and Aria of Lia
("L'Enfant Prodigue") ...Debussy
Miss Bori
"Sailor's Dance" ("Pavot
Rouge") .............. ....Glire
Aria, "Depuis le Jour"
("Louise")..........Charpentier
Miss Bri
The Fifth May Festival Concert
will take place Saturday afternoon
at 2:30.
The Sixth May Festival concert
will take place Saturday evening at
8:15.
Events Today
English Journal Club meets at 4
o'clock in the League. Business meet-
ing at four, including the election of
officers for next year, and an amend-
ment to the constitution. A full at-
tendance is desired. Meeting open
to the public at 4:20, when Mr. J. L.
Davis will speak on: "The Re-inter-
pretation of 17th Century Comedy."
Architects' Open House Tea: The
College of Architecture will hold its
annual open house in the Architec-
tural Building today. Tea will be
.erved in the library from 3:00 until
5:30. There will be exhibitions of
student work in the corridor cases
and in the exhibition hall. The pub-
lic is invited,
Varsity Band: Full marching band
report at South Ferry Field at 3:50
p.m. to play for Ohio State Ball Game.
Members with 3:00 o'clock classes
report as soon as possible. 4 truck
will take the heavy instruments down.
Full uniform and marching folios.
Bring athletic coupon books.
Theosophy: The Ann Arbor Theo-
sophical Society will discuss "Talks
with a Class," by Annie Besant, at
8 p.m., Michigan League. Those in-
terested are cordially welcome.
Presbyterian Students: Dancing to
good music, and lots of fun will fea-
ture the party to be held tonight at
the Presbyterian church house on
Washtenaw. Everybody welcome.
Coming Events
Poetry Reading Contest -Prelimi-
naries: The preliminaries in this con-
test will be held Monday evening, May
14, at 7 o'clock, at 7 o'clock, in Room
205 Mason Hall. The order of speak-
ing will be determined at this time.
Contestants unable to come at 7 o'-
clock should notify Prof. Hollister.
Persons interested are cordially in-
vited to hear this contest.
Adelphi Banquet will be held Tues-
day, May 15, Michigan League, 7:00.
Reservations are essential and may
be made with Eugene Wilhelm and
Melvin Levy before noon Monday,
May 14. All former members of the
society are cordially invited.

Outdoor Club: The Michigan Out-
door Club is sponsoring a supper
party from 2 to 8 p.m. Saturday at
Highland Lake. The group attend-
ing will meet at Lane Hall a few
minutes before the hour. There will
be boating, hiking, and if the weather

-associated Press Photo
The projected New York to Rome
flight by Cesare Sabelli (left) and
Capt. George Pond marks the aPp-
proach of another summer trans,
Atlantic flying season. Eight or nine
ocean hops have been planned by
various fliers. Above is the mono-
plane "Leonardo Da Vinci" in which
Pond and Sabelli hope to reach the
Italian capital in a non-stop flight.
Their plans for the hop have been
delayed by adverse weather condi-
tions ever since last August. Their
plane is capable of developing 300
horsepower, and has a fuel capacity
of 735 gallons, sufficient for 40 hours'
flying.
SchorlingStresses
duty Of1Schools In
Preventinr Crime
The importance of the proper
teaching of dull pupils as an aid in
the prevention of crime was stressed
recently by Prof. Raleigh Schorling
of the School of Education in a speech
made at Chicago. The suggestion that
the schools are partly responsible for
the increasing number of inmates of
prisons and of hospitals for mental
and nervous disorders because they
fail to meet the needs of a great num-
ber of these so-called dull pupils who
remain unadjusted to the curriculum
has been made by persons who are
watching the growth of crime in this
country, Professor Schorling said. .
A dull pupil is one who is just a
little above the point where he would
be classed as a mental defective, ac-
cording to Professor Schorling. In
studies made with these pupils it was
found that their greatest difficulty
lay in reading. In tests given to sixth
grade pupils in the schools of Flint,
it was found that about three-fourths
of the dull pupils were two years or
nore behind the other pupils in their
;lass in reading and arithmetic.
Reading Is Key Subject
Proof of the fact that reading was
the key subject in which dull, pupils
fall down was found when 81 pupils
in the Flint schools were tested in
mathematics. Two sections of dull
pupils registered only .8 and 1.7 points
behind two bright sections and were
ahead of two sections of medium stu-
dents. It was also found that the
ability of dull pupils to retain a sub-
ject once thoroughly mastered was
only slightly less than that of other
pupils.
Parents Must Help
Efforts would have to be made to
build up inthe pupil, through his par-
ents, a liking for school work. Defi-
nite goals would have to be set up
at which the pupils would aim be-
cause, above all other traits, accord-
ing to Professor Schorling, the aim-
lessness of the movements of the dull
pupil in his attempts to study is the
outstanding one, Professor Schorling
said.
permits, swimming. Cost for supper
and transportation will be approxi-
mately 45 cents.
Bicycle Ride: The Graduate Out-
ing Club will sponsor a bicycle ride
Sunday, May 13. The group will start
at 7 a.m. and go through Lima Cen-
ter to the Dexter herorry by back
roads. There will be a light lunch
at the heronry. The party will re-
turn by 1 o'clock. Distance about
25 miles. Borrow (preferably) or
rent a bicycle. Please sign up not
later than 8 p.m. Saturday night on
list either in Angell Hall or at the
west door of Natural Science Audi-
torium, or see W. C. Frohne.
Young People's Society, Church of
Christ (Disciples): Miss Jean Cowin
will present a paper and lead a dis-
cussion on "The Reformation and its
Bearing on Modern Christianity" at

the meeting this Sunday evening. Tea
at 5:00, meeting at 5:30.

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Phone 2-1214. Place advertisements with
classified Advertising Department.
'The classified columlns close at five
o'clock previous to dn. of insertions.
Box Numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.1
Cash in Advance -l ieper reading line
(on basis of flv(. average words to
lne) for one or t wo i nsertions.
14c per reading line for three or more
insert louw.
rininun athreet lines peCr'in.ertion.
Telephone Raitc -!,,c per reading line for
oil(,or two .)illsertions;.
14c per reading line for three or more
insert ions.
10% discount if platd within toCn days
from the date of las:t insertion. j
M1inimum three linter per in:;crtion.1
By Contract, peer line--2 lines daily, one
month ......................... Sc
4 lines E.OD.. 2 mouth ;..3C
2 linles dailycoll.ege yecar .,..7cT
4 lines K 0. D., college year ....7C
100 lines used as desired .....!1c
30f) lines ued as desird ......8c
1.000 lines used as desired ...... 7(
2.000 lilies uvsed as; de ,ired ......6C
Te above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per inch of
7' point Ionic type. upper zd lower
case. add 6c per line to above rates for
all capital letters. Add 6c per line to
above for bold face, upper and lower
case. Add 10 per linetoabove rates for
bold face capital letter,.
WANTED
WANTED: MEN'S OLD AND NEW
suits. Will pay 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 dol-
lars. Phone Ann Arbor 4306. Chi-
cago Buyers. Temporary office. 200
North Main. 5x
NOTICE
AUTO LOANS AND REFINANCING
Bring your title
Associated Motor Services, Inc.
311 W. Huron, Ph. 2-2041
12x
RAISE ANTE FOR DILLINGER
INDIANAPOLIS, May 10: - ')-
Gov. Paul V. McNutt today informed
Gov. Henry Horner, of Illinois, that
Indiana would participate- in the
plan by which five states will each
offer $1,000 for the capture of John
Dillin ger.
Gov. Horner has asked the chief
executive of Indiana, Ohio, Wiscon-
sin and Minnesota to join Illinois
in posting the reward. Gov. George
White, of Ohio, announced Tuesday
that $1,000 had been placed on the
outlaw's head.
Only $25 had been offered by the
bandit's home state until today.

TAXICABS
ARCADE CAB. Dial 6116. Large com-
fortable cabs. Standard rates. 2x
TAXI-Phone 9000. Seven-passenger
cars. Only standard rates. 1x
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRI 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 4x
PERSONAL laundry service. We take
individual interest in the laundry
problem of our customers. Girls'
silks, wools, and fine fabrics guar-
anteed. Men's shirts our specialty.
Call for and deliver. 2-3478, 5594.
611 E. Hoover. 9x
Of MileTeachers
Chester J. Berger of Grand Rapids
was re-elected president of the Mich-
igan Music Teachers Association at
the annual election of officers yes-
terday afternoon in the Union. The
entire present group of officers was
re-elected for the coming year, the
forty-eighth of the Association.
More than 175 members from all
parts of the state assembled for the
two-day meetng, which included
round-table discussions of various
phases of music teaching problems,
lectures, and a Michigan composers'
concert.
Plans were made yesterday noon
for the Golden Jubilee of the Associa-
tion, to be held in 1937.
SEEKS 54 YEAR OLD WAGES
AUSTIN Tex., (/)-A man giving
the name of Tom Smith appeared
recently at the capitol to claim wages
lie said he earned 54 years ago when
the building was being erected. Now
82, he hitch-hiked from the east
coast, he asserted, only to find there
was no record to support his claim.
DAY T" X! I? NIGHT
CAMPUS CABS

'''I

I

I

-Associated Press Photo
Chance To Study Soviet Issues
Offered y ussian University

Remember
MOTH ER'S
DAY
SUNDAY, MAY 13th
With a Box of
CAND&Y

By Sheldon M. Ellis
A chance to combine summer va-
cation with study and European trav-
cl, as well as a first-hand view of
the social, educational and economic
problems of Soviet Russia is being
offered at the Anglo-American In-
stitute of the First Moscow Univer-
sity.
The University, located in the city
of Moscow, presents the student with
an opportunity to travel extensively
throughout Europe and at the same
time secure academic credit which
may be transferred to American
schools. Entrance to the University
is open to students, teachers and so-
cial workers through the cooperation
of the Soviet government and the In-
stitute of International Education.
The Institute originated as a re-
sult of an experiment conducted dur-
ing the summer of 1933 by a group
of American educators. Two courses
dealing with "Experimental Educa-
tional Programs of the Soviet Union"
were offered. The success of the
venture prompted the formation of
the University of Moscow offering
to acquaint the world with the act-
ual conditions in Russia.
The 1934 Summer Session of the
Mescow school, July 15 to August 26,
offers a wide range of courses to serve
as a means of furthering cultural con-
tacts between American, English and
Russian teachers. The courses 'in-
clude studies of Russian art, litera-
ture, education, social problems, eco-
nomics, psychology, and aeronautics
in addition to several classes in the
study of the Russian language. These
courses are prepared primarily for
foreign students, teachers and others
who are interested in life in the Sov-
TRAPPEJ ON LEDGE; DIES
MIAMI. Fla., May 10.-- (W)-Shir-
ley Brewer, 43 years old, died today
after being imprisoned for six days
on a narrow ledge 11 stories above the
ground in an unfinished hotel build-
ing.
He had alpoe ntly fallen fromthe
roof to the narrow ledge which saved
him from plunging down an elevator
shaft.
BRIGHT SPOT
802 Packard Street
Luncheon 20c -25c
11:30to130
Dinner. . 30c - 35c
5:15 to 7:45
YOU'LL BE SURPRISED

iet Union. The University is under
the direction of a faculty of Soviet
professors and specialists, with an
advisory staff of American instruct-
o1's.
The Anglo-American Institute
functions with a two-fold purpose:
fi st, to provide foreign visitors to
the Soviet Union with the academic
facilities and programs necessary for
serious study and research; second,
to publish material on Soviet educa-
tional, social and cultural movements
for the information and use of edu-
cators and students in all English
speaking countries.
The students is also offered ath-
letic, cultural and social activities,
which are provided for the visitor
through the cooperation of Soviet
student groups. Sightseeing, the
theater, the cinema, boating and
bathing, the publishing of a "wall
newspaper," are but a few of the
extra-curricular activities available.
Racial Superiority
'As Is' - In Africa
WASHINGTON, May 10. - (IP) -
Ideas of racial superiority are found
even among primitive peoples, says
Dr. John M. Cooper of Catholic Uni-
versity of America. He cites this
anecdote:
An African explorer had two
groups of porters -- one from a
"highbrow" tribe, the other from a
"lowbrow" group. They were hun-
gry.
One of the "lowbrow" tribesmen
begin picking up cockroaches and
ca ting 'them.
"Disgusting," 1ort d uriC of the
hbo savages in his native
tongue. "My people never would eat
such things - unless they were first
cooked."
S~t
harLet~
Rugs
Loves ofY
mat.
1 5c

to
bad
9-12
a fin ere op rated
restaurant

Assorted Chocolates
1-lb. box..........
De Luxe Book Assort-
anent, 20 oz.........

39c

1.00

Satin Heart, assortm't 79
Milk Chocolates, 15 oz. C

De Luxe Book, 2 -lb.
Ass't., Milk Chocolates

$.95

o w

MICHIGAN

NOW

Wrapped for Mailing
Free of Charge

or

w.

ARBOR SPRINGS WATER

Brings To You The Taste.
of Real Spring Water!
ORDER A CASE TODAY-
Delivered to your home in case lots of six 2-quart bottles
ARBOR SPRINGS WATER CO.
416 West Huron Phone 8270

7 FAN ClES ANO y NG
FOUR ALBEE SISTERS
America's Greatest
Sister Act
Bo,,,on Brunette Band
VORIEE'S DANCERS
SI)AWN S STE RS
ELAINE MANZI
DELL O'DELL
and MARIE PARIS
Mistress of Ceremonies
Q;_a

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U:

MILK-ICE CREAM
Week-End Special

11

WHITNEY
L1A0ST D AY
Last Day
CHESTER MORRIS

ENDS
TON I GH T

AETI

JOSEPH M sCHENCK presents
A DARARYL F. ZANUCIC
Production ivith
^ -
MU A I & rR ae .li

a
E
11'
0" .
?CENT d Rl

ENDS
TONIGHT

The Law Got Them In ... But He Got Them Out-

I.

'V__ ;,
4'

O0 c,
NWr

andj
JOHN MACK BROWN
sl,,Dwc e r . rwl..ilr

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