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May 06, 1934 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1934-05-06

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

lICHIGAN DAILY

,,. '

o

I uen wLo s mf. ,,,&kw rtaW(W0I
Fuoushed every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Meiber of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
soceiatcd aole itt rcs
1933 (r ... coSiik6i)[9234
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is enclusively entitled to the use
frr republication of all news dispathees credited to It or
not otherwise credited in %~i paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
diteed at the d.ostOffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General ,
Sub'scription durin: summer by carrier, $1.00; by mal,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $3.75; by
mal, $4.25.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: Coege Publications Representatives,
Inc., 4C East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylson Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
-Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR.........THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
CITY EDITOR........................BIACKLY SHAW
EDITORIAL DIREC72OR............C. HART SCHAAF
SPORTS EDITOR...................ALBERT H. NEWMAN
WOMEN'S EDITOR....................CAROL J. HANAN
NIGHT EDITORS: A. Elis Ball, Ralph G. Coulter. William
G. Perris, John C, Healcy, George Van Vleck, E. Jerome
Pettit.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Arthur W. Car
stens, Roland L. Martin, Marjorie Western.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Beck, Eleanor Blum,
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret D. ?halan.
REPORTERS: C. Bradford Carpenter, Paul J. Elliott,
Courtney A. Evans, John J. Flaherty, Thomas A. Groen,
John Kerr, Thomas H. Klene, Bernard B. Levck, David
G.' MacDonald Joel P. Newman, John M. O'Connell,
Kenneth Parker, William R. Reed, Robert S. Ruwitch,
Arthur S. Settle, Jacob C. Seidel, Marshall D. Silverman,
Arthur M. Taub.
Dorothy Glee, Jean Hanmer, Florence Harper, Eleanor
Johnson, Ruth Loebs, Josephine McLean, Marjorie Mor-
rison, Sally Place, Rosalie Resnick, Jane Schneider.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER............W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER ...........BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER:...................
..........G.. CATHARINE M HENRY
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Noel Tur-
ner; Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Service, Robert Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circula-
tion and Contracts, Jack Efroymson.
ASSISTANTS: Milton Kramer John Ogden, Bernard Ros-
enthal, Joe Rothbard, George Atherton.
Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell, Mary Bursley, Peggy Cady,
Virginia Cluff, Patricia Daly, Genevieve Field, Louise
Florez, Doris Gimmy, Betty Grve, Billie Griffiths, Janet
Jackson, Louise Krause, Barbara Morgan, Margaret
Mustard, Betty Simonds.
FRESHMAN TRYOUTS: William Jackson, Louis Gold-
smith, David Schiffer, William Barndt, Jack Richardson,
Charles Parker, Robert Owen, Ted Wohgemuth, Jerome
Grossman, Avnr, Kronenberger, Jim Horiskey, Tom
Clarke, Scott, Samuel Beckman, Homer Lathrop, Hall,
Ross Levin, Willy Tomlinson, Dean Asselin, Lyman
Bittman, John Park, Don Hutton, Allen Ulpson, Richard
Hardenbrook, Gordon Cohn.
NIGHT EDITOR: A. ELLIS BALL
Again
The May Fesivl...
O NCE AGAIN THE MAY FESTIVAL
puts in its welcome appearance.]
This years is undoubtedly one of the most,
difficult the Festival has had to face, yet1
again the standards of previous Festivals is main-I
tained. It is 'seldom that a group of artists of the
calibre of those who will perform here during the1
coming week can be heard at such popular prices1
and under the favorable conditions of a festival.
Much of the felicity of the Festival is the result
of the degree to which it is educational. The par
ticipation in it of the Choral Union and the YoungI
People's Chorus enables it to fulfill the purpose ofl
the University, for both the college and the grade
school students who are members of these groups1
acquire through the festival not only the feelingt
for performance but also the capacity of appre-
ciation. .
Congratulations are most certainly due the man-
agers.E

tax, the liquor tax and others, cities and counties
are dependent solely upon the collection which
they make from the delinquent taxes of preceding
years and the current taxes.
In planning to meet- future obligations, the City
Council must depend upon estimated receipts from
tax collections. With what assurance may a mu-
nicipality face the future if it must fear that the
State government may at any time sweep away its
regular income?
And what can be said of forcing municipalities
throughout the state into financial exigencies
when the action does not accomplish its avowed
purpose? Although the Moore-Holbeck Bill was
designed to prevent home-owners from losing their
homes because of failure to meet tax obligations,
it was shown in a recent survey made here by the
Michigan Municipal League that the majority of
property on which delinquent taxes had accumu-
lated was unimproved. Thus, the bill, rather than
protecting home-owners, is endangering the finan-
cial structure of cities simply to protect speculators
in real-estate.
Furthermore, taxpayers, outside of a certain
few who were in legitimate straits, are not bene-
fited by such action. By permitting the unpaid
taxes to accumulate until they present a real finan-
cial emergency, when the lump sum of several
taxes comes due, the State may find that home-
owners will be hurt rather than aided.
What simple taxpayer would be so foolish as to
pay his taxes promptly while there remains the
possibility that the State Legislature may grant
some further favor?
Thus the city, with sufficient money rightfully
due it, and with which it could honorably discharge
its debts, may be forced to refinance the bond issue
when it comes due.
Musical Events
FOUR NEW RECORD RELEASES
"Pleasure Dome of Kublai Khan" by Charles
Griffes recorded by the Minneapolis Sym-
phony Orchestra under Eugene Ormandy;
Victor 7957 A-B.
"Sonata for Violin and Piano by Richard
Strauss," recorded by Jascha Heifitz and
Arpad Sandor; Victor Master Series, M-200,
7974-5-6-7.
Two songs sung by Rose Bampton: "In the
Luxembourg Gardens" (Manning) and "A
Song for Lovers" (from "Three Songs") by
Deems Taylor; Victor 1648 A-B.
Two Songs sung by Richard Crooks: "My Song
Goes 'Round the World," (Kennedy-May)
and "O Song Divine" (St. Ives-Temple);
Victor 1647 A-B.
THERECENT RELEASES of the Victor RCA
Company have among them four works that
contribute in individual ways to a record library.
"The Pleasure Dome of Kublai Khan," written by
the late Charles Griffes, American musician, is a
pictorial setting for the verse of S. T. Coleridge,
beginning:
In Xanadu did Kubla Khan
A stately pleasure dome decree:
Where Alph, the sacred river, ran
Through caverns measureless to man
Down to a sunless sea.
Griffes' tone-poem gives a langorous, oriental
feeling for the atmosphere indicated by the word-
poem. It is of the Debussy-Ravel type, perhaps not'
as pretentious, but well done in "mingled meas-
ures." The recording itself is clear and warm. ,
The Strauss Sonata is a first recording. The com-
poser of "Emn Heldenleben," being played at the
May Festival Saturday, wrote only one violin son-
ata, and that early in his career. Before that he
had written a violin concerto in D. This Sonata,
grandly recorded by Heifitz and Sandor, (Heifitz
was here for last year's festival), foreshadows in
many spots the later Strauss, particularly in the
last movement with its joyous upward progression
and rhythmic importance. The second movement,j
"Improvisation; Andante Contabile," is impromptu
in effect, rather secretive, moving into a middle
portion of excitement, then to a bright repartee
between the instruments.
Of the two groups of songs you will probably
like the Bampton recordings better, unless a con-
tralto (mezzo-soprano) is one of the things you
don't like. The poems are better; to begin with the

music is better, so that with Miss Bampton's pure
voice the songs are enchanting. Crooks sings with
great feeling the two ballad-like songs, accom-
panied by orchestra. He has a powerful voice, and
you can understand every word.
If you'll hear these records you can find out
for yourself the individual qualities which I have
mer'ely indicated.--Saly Place.
The Band, under Leonard Falcone, with Joseph
Brinkman, soloist, is playing in Detroit at the Naval
Armory tonight.

Screen Reflections
AT TIlE MAJESTIC
-- "BOLERO"
Raoul . . .......... . . . .......George Raft
Helen .. . .. . . . ..........Carole Lombard
Mike ........ . ... . .....William Frawley
Directed by ............ Wesley Ruggles
Amateur night at a nickleodeon, 1910: Young,
cock-sure Raoul DeBaere "gets the hook" in his
second attempt to put himself over as a dancer.
But Raoul will not accept defeat. He is sure he
has what it takes.i Thus opens Paramount's latest
feature to reach town. It is kind of stringy in that
the scenes are none too well knit together, but on
the whole Director Ruggles has turned out a pretty
good show that is above the average in entertain-
ment value inasmuch as its photography is beau-
tiful, its acting capable, and its dancing graceful
if not exactly intricate.
Raoul realizes that a female partner is needed to
give the act flash and color, but has trouble with
each of his short-lived partners because they in-
sist on falling in love with him. Consistent with
his principle that "you can't mix business with
pleasure," he has numerous partners until he teams
up with a girl, Helen, whose ideas on the subject
are much the same. They hit it off swell, rising
gradually to great success as a dancing team in
the most exclusive night clubs on the continent,
until Raoul slips and falls for Helen. But his pride
keeps him from letting her know until it is a bit
too late. The climax of the film is effectively con-
structed and is sincerely the most intense point
in the narrative.
Reaching stardom for the first time, George Raft
manages to evade the sleekly-gigilo type he has
hitherto portrayed. Consequently he is much more
natural and likable. Much money was spent in
reproducing with accuracy the nickelodeon of the
past, the Hoboken beer gardens of the tales we
heard tell on our mother's lap but never saw, and
the night salons of the pre-war Paris. No doubt
much more money was spent than was necessary.
It is an old Hollywood habit that insists on going
the limit as far as clothes and scenery go, but
pinches when the studio help and extras demand
higher salaries. -J.C.S.

MAY

FESTIVAL
MAY 9, 10, 11, 12.
Artists

I .l

MOT14ER
DA-
GREETING
Also MOTHER'S DAY
POSTAGE STAMPS
0. D. Morrill
314 South State
GREETING CARDS
FOR ALL OCCASIONS

LUCREZIA BORI .....Soprano
ROSA PONSELLE .... Soprano
JEANNETTE VREELAND...
...... Soprano
COE GLADE ........ Contralto
PAUL ALTHOUSE ...... Tenor
ARTHUR HACKETT ...Tenor

THEODORE WEBB.. Baritone
CHASE BAROMEO......Bass
GUILA BUSTABO.....Violinist
MISCHA LEVITZKI. . .Pianist
MABEL ROSS RHEAD......
.. Accompanist
PALMER CHRISTIAN Organist

AT THE WHITNEY
"BEGGARS IN ERMINE"

**

The Whitney offering for this week-end is not as
unpreposessing as its title sounds. "Beggars in
Ermine" is an unusual story built around the mis-'
fortunes of the manager of a steel mill. The man,
portrayed quite convincingly by Lionel Atwill, is
ruined by an enemy by means of having molten
steel accidentally dropped on the ground near him,
splattering his legs, and making him a cripple.
His wife deserts him, taking his daughter with her.
He becomes a begger and organizes hundreds of
other beggars to form a sort of profit-sharing
union. His purpose in life is to find his daughter,
support her secretly, and eventually get revenge
on his enemies. The subsequent situations are
well thought out and developed into a successful
climax which is handled with a dexterity that puts
the picture above the ordinary standard of its type,
There are definitely weak spots present, but not
enough of them to drag the story down to an
inferior level. The cast supporting Mr. Atwill is
satisfyingly capable, and, in all, "Beggars in Er-
mine" is an acceptable picture. -C.B.C.
Coleite Obsef:rver
By BUD BERNARD
A professor of the forestry department at the
University of California offered prospective fire-
fighters this bit of sane advice:
"The main thing to remember in fighting a
forest fire," he told his class last week, "is to keep
cool."
At the Los Angeles Junior College students
taking a history test were asked to state briefly
the Monroe Doctrine. The laurel wreath went
to him who answered, "Scram, foreigners."
* * * *
Members of a world-famed prohibition organi-
zation have recently entered their objections to the
use of wine-flavored lipsticks "because young co-
eds and high school girls are the ones who will
buy these lipsticks."
to "make the story as dirty as you can."* (The re-
porter has admitted this. There are thirty wit-
nesses.)
Why does the Daily want to expel these students?
Because some went in to make a sociological study
of what happens when a city government tramples
under foot the Constitutional guarantees of free
speech and free assemblage to the people of the
United States. Because others wanted tangibly to
show their sympathy with Detroiters who were
American enough to resent this brazen denial of
their rights as citizens. That is whom The Daily
wants to expel.
But I am wrong. I don't believe The Daily wants
this. I don't believe the majority of students who
faithfully work on The Daily want this. And I know
the great student body who support and read The
Daily, whose paper it is supposed to be, do not
want this.
Who does then? A small political group who
occupy some of the most important positions on
The Daily, who have long ceased to reflect student
opinion, who either consider it a joyous lark to see
students expelled for no just cause, or are mali-
ciously inspired to wreak as much havoc as possible
during the short time they are in school - even
to the extent of wrecking the lives and futures of
innocent fellow students.
I voice my determined protest against the flag-
rant yellow journalism displayed in the offending
editorial. I call on all self-respecting students of
the University of Michigan, who want to be able

Organizations
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION....... .........30 Voices
THE CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA ............70 Players
YOUNG PEOPLE'S FESTIVAL CHORUS..............400 Voices
THE STANLEY CHORUS..............................Women
Choral"Wor ks
SONG OF PEACE (Ein Friedenslied) ............... Robert Heger
NINTH SYMPHONY ..................................Beethoven
THE SEASONS .........................................Haydn
THE UGLY DUCKLING ........... ................. ..English
BY THE RUINS OF BABYLON .......................Loeffler
Conductors
EARL V. MOORE ...............................Musical Director
FREDERICK STOCK ......................Orchestra Conductor
ERIC DeLAMARTER .............. ......Associate Conductor
JUVA HIGBEE................... .Young People's Conductor
T
, WEDNESDAY EVENING, 8:15
ROSA PONSELLE, Soprano
CHICAGOSYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
Prelude and Fugue ("St. Anne's") E-flat major..........Bach-Stock
Aria, "el Raggio Lusinghier," ("Semiramide")............Rossini
MISS PONSELLE
La Mer (The Sea) ...........................................Debussy
From Dawn to Noon at Sea
Gambols of the Waves
Dialogue Between the Wind and Sea
Arias, "Adio del Passato" (La Traviata").....................Verdi
"Chanson Boheme" ("Carmen")......................izet
MISS PONSELLE
Rapsodie Espagnole............................................Ravel
Songs with Piano:
Freschi Luoghi Prati Aulenti...................Stefano Donaudy
Marietta's Lied from "Die Tote Stadt"..........Erich Korngold
Respetto ................. ...............'E. Wolf-Ferrari
Si Tu Le Voulais....... .....................F. Paolu Tosti
My Lover He Comes on a Ski.....................Clough-Leightr
ROSA PONSELLE
Mr. Stuart Ross at the Piano
II. THURSDAY EVENING, 8:15
JEANNETTE VREELAND, Soprano MISCHA LEVITSKI, Pianist
PAUL AL'rHOUSE, Tenor PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organist
CHASE BAROMEO, Bass UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHETRA
EARL V. MOORE and FREDERICK STOCK, Conductors
"The Seasons".....r................. ....Haydn
An Oratorio for Soprano, Tenor, and Bass Soi,
Mixed Chorus, Orchestra, and Organ
MISS VREELAND, Messrs. ALTHOUSE and BAROMEO and the
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
Concerto in G minor for Piano and Orchestra, Op. 22 ....Saint-Saens
Andante sostenuto
Allegro scherzando
Presto
111. FRIDAY AFTERNOON, 2:30
GUILA BUSTABO, Violinist ERIC DE LAMvARTER and
YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS JUVA HIGBEE Conductors
STANLEY CHORUS
Allegro from Concerta No2 in F major for Trumpet ana
Strings ("Brandenberg).......................Bach
Songs:
On Wings of Song.................................Mendelssohn
Hedge Roses. ........-.............................Schubert
Blue Danube Walt... ............J. strauss
YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS
Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso for Violin and Orchestra,
Op. 28B..... ..................i' ...........Saint-Saens
Cantata, "The Ugly Duckling".......... .English
YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS .......nls
First Symphony..... ........................................ Milhaud
By the Waters of Babylon.. . ... ........... effe
THE STANLEY CHORUS
Andante and Rondo-Allegro from "Symphony Espagnole"
for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 21 ..........,....... ........Lalo
MISS BUSTABO
IV. FRIDAY EVENING, 8:15
LUCREZIA BORL. Sorano
CHICAGO SYPMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
Fantasie, "A Night on a Bare Mountain"..............Moussorgsky
Aria. "Voi ohe sapete" ...................................Mozart
LUCREZIA BORI Ba
.Symphony No. 4 in E minor, Op. 98 ...........................Brahms
Recitative and Aria of Lia (L'Enfant Prodigue")...........Debussy
MISS BON
"Sailor's Dance" ("Pavot Rouge")............................Gliere
Aria, "Depuis le Jour" ("Louise")........................Charpentier
MISS BORI
V. SATURDAY AFTERNOON, 2:30
JEANNETTE VREELAND, Soprano THEODORE WEBB. Bass
COE GLADE, Contralto ' UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
ARTHUR HACKETT, Tenor CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
Overture to "CarioanusJ' Op. 62..........................Beethoven
Symphony No. 9, in D minor, Op. 125 ......................Beethoven
MISS VREELAND, MISS GLADE, MR: HACKETT, AND MR. WEBB
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
Tone Poem, "Ein Heldeneben," Op. 40....................... Strauss
The Hero
The Hero's Adversaries
The Hero's Com anion
The Hero's Battlefield
The Hero's Mission of Peace
The Hero's Escape from the World - Conclusion

V, SATURDAY EVENING, 8:15
JEANNETTE VREELAND, Soprano CHASE BAROMEO, Ba-ss
COE GLADE, Contralto -PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organist
PAUL ALTHOUSE, Tenor UNIVERSITY: CHORAL UNION

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Tay.x Plight Of Ann
Ar>or, Other Cities...
THE POOR LITTLE rich city! With
over $275,000 in delinquent taxes,
made uncollectable by State legislative action,
Ann Arbor will find itself embarrassed when its
$100,000 bond issue comes due in August.
The State Legislature, ut of consideration
for the home and property owners in Michigan
who have not paid taxes of 1933 and prior years,
reduced the penalty and extended the time limit
on delinquent taxes due the city, the school-board;
the county, and itself. This was accomplished
through the Moore-Holbeck Bill of 1933, and others
that have followed.
In the Moore-Holbeck Bill, which still arouses
argument with regard to its efficacy and intention,
State senators announced that they would permit
the payment of delinquent taxes due in 1932 and
prior in ten annual payments, beginning Sep-
tember, 1935. Penalties hae been reduced to four
per cent beginning in 1936.
To Ann Arbor, this means that of over $163,000
due in delinquent taxes from that period, only
ten per cent will be available to the city, and that
not until September, 1935.
Another generous grant to delinquent taxpayers
was a bit of legislation passed this year which
made taxes due in 1933 uncollectable until No-
vember of this year by reducing the penalty from
10 per cent to 3 per cent if paid at that time. Over

Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be con-
strued as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disregarded.
The names of communicants will, however, be re-
garded as confidential upon request. Contributors
are asked to be brief, confining themselves to less
than 500 words if possible.
MAY DAY EXPULSIONS
To The Editor:
A recent editorial in The Daily advocates the
expulsion of the so-called "leaders" of the student
delegation that went into Detroit on May Day.
(That it does so in an undercover way by singling
out one of these "leaders" whom it would like to
see "far removed from the campus," does not lessen
the gravity of the charge and the likelihood of
The Daily's action being extended to include
others).
The Daily advocates the expulsion of those indi-
viduals whom it points to as "leaders,?" when it
knows that the delegation was voluntary, largely
spontaneous, without any actual leaders, except

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