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April 29, 1934 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1934-04-29

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

MICHIGAN DAILY

6

t uao .a + zr

Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
a$ocitat4d (toUtiate 'res
=" 3 1934

the world except the race of the greyhound
after the electric hare. Leave all that to the
romantic and ignorant Americans, who happen
to be, like myself, blond, and six feet high.
What there is, and probably always will be
during one epoch, is the solid fact that out of
every hundred persons, only five at most will
be capable of making decisions and giving di-
rections Whether the five are called Nordics
or blond beasts, or simply bosses, does not
matter a scrap. It is pleasant for Hans and
Fritz to imagine themselves Allerhoechst, be-
cause they have their flaxen hair and blue
eyes . . : I have never taught "the biological
gospel of a new race-aristocracy." My con-
tempt for that disguise of simple snobbery is
unbounded . . . There is no such thing as a
Superman. There are super mathematicians
like Einstein, and super playwrights like my-
self; but they are bungling amateurs in a dozen
other departments of human activity. In the
theatre I am my chauffeur's master; but in the
garage he is mine . . . I know barely enough
German to understand the title of your books,
and nothing on earth would induce me to
read one of them, though your letter is amus-
ing enough to extract this answer from me
on a very wet day in Stresci. Thank you for it.
Faithfully,
G. Bernard Shaw."
-M. Levi.
(EDITOR'S NOTE: The above is the first
of two articles that will be printed on the
subject of the alleged superiority of the Nordic
race.)

MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is encusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispathces credited to it or
not otherwise credited in thi. paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Asistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $3.75; by
mail, $4.25.,
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives,
Inc., 4 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; -80
Boylson Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR.........THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR.............C. HART SCHAAF
CITY EDITOR.........................BiAACKLgY SHAW
SPORTS EDITOR...............ALBERT H. NEWMAN
WOMEN'S EDITOR ...................CAROL J. HANAN
VIGHT EDITORS: A. Ellis Ball, Ralph G. Coulter. William
G. Ferris, John C, Healey, George Van Veck, E. Jerome
Pettit.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Arthur W. Car-
stens, Roland L. Martin, Marjorie Western.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Beck, Eleanor Blum,
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan.
REPORTERS: C. Bradford Carpenter, Paul J. Elliott,
Courtney A. Evans, John J. Flaherty, Thoms A. Groehn,
John Kerr, Thomas H. Kleene, Bernard B. Levick, David
G. MacDonald, Joel P. Newman, John M. O'Connell,
Kenneth Parker, William R. Reed, Robert S. Ruwitch,
Arthur S. Settle, Jacob C. Seidel, Marshall D. Silverman,
Arthur M. Taub
Dorothy Gles, Jea Hanmer, Florence Harper. Eleanor
Johnson, Ruth Loebs, Josephine McLean, Marjorie Mor-
rison, Sally Place, Rosalie Resnick, Jane Schneider.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER.............W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER...........BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER .....................
............................ CATHARINE MC HENRY
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Noel Tur-
ner: Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Service, Robert Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circula-
tion and Contracts, Jack Efroymson.
ASSISTANTS: Milton Kramer, JohnOgden, Bernard Ros-
enthal, Joe Rothbard, George Atherton.
Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell, Mary Bursley, Peggy Cady,
Virginia Cluff, Patricia Daly, Genevieve Field, Louise
Florez, Doris Gimmy, Betty Greve, Billie Griffiths, Janet
Jackson, Louise Krause, Barbara Morgan, Margaret
Mustard, Betty Simonds.
FRESHMAN TRYOUTS: William Jackson, Louis Gold-
smith, David Schiffer, William Barndt, Jack Richardson,
Charles Parker, Robert Owen, Ted Wohlgemuth, Jerome
Grossman, Avnr, Kronenberger, Jim Horiskey, Tom
Clarke, Scott, Samuel Beckman, Homer Lathrop, Hall,
Ross Levin, Willy Tomlinson, Dean Asselin, Lyman
Rittman, John Park, Don Hutton, Allen Ulpson, Richard
Hiardenbrook, Gordon Cohn.
NIGHT EDITOR: WILLIAM G. FERRIS
Court Costs
Are Too High .. .
T HE INADEQUACY of our present
legal system in civil cases was
strikingly brought out recently when it was report-
ed that a New York man spent three years
and incurred costs of $3,000 in a law suit to recover
overcharges made by a telephone company total-
ling $5.40. The victory was entirely a moral one.
Business is beginning to turn more and more
away from litigation in the courts as the costs
mount higher and higher. Open book accounts are
carried for months by firms that cannot collect
their bills because "the legal costs of a law suit to
force collection would be more than the amount of
the bill," as many business men will aver.
Lawyers themselves proclaim with pride that
they are preventing litigation more and more these
days, settling many of their cases out of court.
What does not come to light is that the settle-
ment out of court is often grossly unfair to the
man who cannot afford attorney's fees, while it
favors the man who is well equipped to wage a
legal battle.
If the courts can arrive at a just decision, they
ought to be used more, and it ought to be the duty
of the lawyers to encourage the use of the courts
by insisting on a reduction of court costs. By so
doing, they would in the long run increase their
amount of business and hence their fees, aside from
the benefit which the change would work in the
relations between business men.
Campus Opinion

Letters published in this column should not be con-
strued as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disregarded.
The names of communicants will,. however, be re-
garded as confidential upon request. Contributors
are asked to be brief, confining themselves to less
than 500 words if possible;
THE NORDIC MYTH
To The Editor:
It is well known that the Nazis lay particular
stress upon superiority of the Nordic race, An
amusing incident occurred in this connection when
a certain Dr. Franz Haiser, an Austrian Nazi, felt
uncertain about the wisdom of some of the Hitler
planks, more especially, it seems, the one regard-
ing the suneriority of the Nordie rae Tn nrder

The Theatre
DRAMATIC SEASON PROGRAM
THE following is the program of Robert Hender-
son's 1934 Ann Arbor Dramatic Season, which
will run for five weeks, from May 14 through
June 16:
First Week:
Monday, May 14-The American Premiere Pro-
duction of "Charlotte, Emily and Anne" with
Elizabeth Risdon, Violet Kemble-Cooper and
Eugene Powers.
Tuesday, May 15 - "Charlotte, Emily and Anne.
Wednesday Matinee and Night, May 16 - "Char-
lotte, Emily and Anne."
Thursday, May 17-- "Charlotte, Emily and Anne."
Friday Matinee and Night, May 18 - "Charlotte,
Emily and Anne."
Saturday Matinee and Night, May 19 - "And So
To Bed" with Madame Eugenie Leontovich, Rollo
Peters and Roberta Beatty.
Second Week:
Monday, May 21 - "And So To Bed."
Tuesday, May 22-- "And So To Bed."
Wednesday Matinee and Night, May 23-- "And So
To Bed."
Special Thursday Matinee, May 24, at 4:15 p.m.-
Mr. Guy Maier in "A Musical Journey To Austria
and Bavaria," for children.
Thursday Night, May 24 -"And So To Bed."
Friday Matinee and Night, May 25- "The Shining
Hour" with Bert Lytell, Violet Kemble-Cooper
and Jessie Busley.
Saturday Matinee and Night, May 26 - "The Shin-
ing Hour."
Third Week:
Monday, May 28- "The Shining Hour."
Tuesday, May 29- "The Shining Hour."
Wednesday Matinee, May 30-"The Shining Hour."
Wednesday Night, May 30-- "Meet My Sister" with
Walter Slezak, Olive*Olsen and Margaret Adams.
Special Thursday Matinee, May 31, at 4:15 p.m.-
Mr. Guy Maier in "A Musical Journey to Spain;
and Majorca" for young people and adults.
Thursday Night, May 31- "Meet My Sister."
Friday, Matinee and Night, June 1- "Meet My
Sister."
Saturday, Matinee and Night, June 2 - "Meet My
Sister."
Fourth Week:
Monday, June 4 - "Meet My Sister."
Tuesday, June 5 - "Macbeth" with Ian Keith.
Wednesday Matinee and Night, June 6 - "Mac-
beth."
Thursday, June 7-- "Macbeth."
Friday Matinee and Night, June 8 - "Macbeth."
Saturday Matinee and Night, June 9- "Macbeth."
Fifth Week:
Monday, June 11 - "She Loves Me Not" with
Gloria Blondell.
Tuesday, June 12 - "She Loves Me Not."

,

PHOTOS

5 WEEKS - MAY 14 through JUNE 16 - 6 PLAYS
Season Tikets
Now On Sale
The Six Plays for $3.00, $4.00 and $6.00
Alumnx Council Office, Michigan LEAGUE Bldg.

DAILY CLASSIFIEDS ADS ARE EFFECTIVE
W' DOO OU PR
Let a Permanent Campus Organization make
your arrangements at no increase over
regular tariff rates.
Airplane, Steamship, Railway and Hotel
Reservations in any part of the world.
MICHIGAN ALUMNI TRAVEL BUREAU
ALUMNI MEMORIAL HALL
tAjj terican Express World-Wide Servi ce"

MILITARY
BALL
50c Each
Francisco
Boyc
723 North U. 108 E. Liberty

of the

III I MNXM

Screen* Reflections
AT THE MAJESTIC
** "SONS OF THE DESERT"
With Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy
NO STARS "KEEP 'EM ROLLING"
Benny .................. Walter Huston
The two inimitable comedians are back again.
They are not Arabians but are instead ultra-hen-
pecked husbands of two shrews they have learned
to call wives. Determined to keep their solemn
fraternal oath to attend their national convention
at Chicago, they bribe a veterinarian to prescribe
a trip to the South Seas as a cure. They get to
the windy city, fooling their wives.
Messrs. Laurel and Hardy are funny and the
audience's reception was hearty and vociferous. A
thin plot ,old situations, plenty of slap-stick, and a
bag full of bad puns all contribute to what we
Americans like and call humor. The fact that these,
films have a drawing power substantiates our edu-
cators accusations against us that we have a cul-
tural lag.
"Keep 'Em Rolling" is frank propaganda of the
old destructive war machine as it gathers momen-
tum in its malicious attempt to arouse us to a
blind frenzy of war preparedness and the glorifica-
tion of brass buttons. This propaganda is a bad
job because one easily recognizes it as such. Walter
Huston's acting is bad in his unsuccessful attempt
to portray the character of a silly and emotionally
childish soldier who lives, sleeps, and eats with his
pet horse. The theme is obviously to show us what
a paradise it is to be a soldier.
A series of disjointed sequences beginning in 1915
and carrying us to the present time constitute the
film's poor continuity. The producers of this film
(Radio) tried to disguise the real theme by an in-
sistent harping on the love old Benny had for his
horse. In these trying times every art should be
utilized to secure world peace and economic secur-
ity. Films of this type serve only to aggravate the
situation and are destructive to the peace every-
one desires. One's refusal to see such a film will
make it a financial failure and will discourage
others of its calibre from being produced.
-J.C.S.

FIRST NATIONAL BANK
AND TRUST COMPANY
T ; Y A E stablish ed 1863
Olcdcst National Bank
In Michigan
. 1f( II I, Every Banking Service Available
Domestic --- Foreign
Nei under . S. overnment Supervision
Member Federal Reserve System
U~ulei ~

Read The
DAJILY
CLASS-IlVIE V
AL)S

Wednesday Matinee and Night,
Loves Me Not."
Special Thursday Matinee, June
Me Not."
Thursday Night, June 14 - "She
Friday Matinee and Night, June
Me Not."
Saturday Matinee and Night,
Loves Me Not."
Monday, June 18 - "She Loves
Closing).

June 13 - "She
14 -"She Loves
Loves Me Not."
15 - "She Loves
June 16 - "She
Me Not" (Gala

1

11

BOOK-- a few titles of the
BEST NEW PLAYS

Tv _ .. _ .

_

Musical Events

Collegiate Observer
By BUD BERNARD
Keats when disappointed in love, made the
statement that his heart had turned to ashes. The
Farthest North Collegian at College, Alaska says
that fickle women do sort of burn a guy up. (Even
up in the frigid climates I guess.)
* * * *
SING SONG
Chi Omegas cuties true,
And pops all chewing gum,
Alpha Chi's and Tri-Delts too,
May be all right for some,
But I'll just take the little girl,
Who is a Delta Gam,
Who'll drink and smoke and love you too,
And never give a damn.
-Daily Illini,
When asked how lie could tell a professor
from astudent a-sophomore at Cornell said:
"Ask him 'what "it" is, and if he says it's a
pronoun he's a professor."
THE SEVEN STAGES OF A STAG

BERNARD SHAW: "Three Plays," "Too True to be Good,"
rVillage Wooing," and "On the Rocks"...........
EUGENE O'NEIL: Ah, Wilderness...................
EUGENE O'NEIL: Days Without End...... . ..
EUGENE O'NEIL : Nine Plays......................
LENNOX ROBINSON: Is Life Worth Living............
SIDNEY KINGSLEY: Men in White..................
O'CASEY: Within the Gates....... ..... . . . ...
DON MARQUIS: Master of the Revels...............
KEITH WINTER: The Shining Hour.................
GERTRUDE STEIN: Four Saints in Three Acts. .........
THOMAS: Uncle Tom's Cabin (A Dramatic Version)....

$2.50
2.50
2.50
4.0 0
125
2.00
1.75
2.00
1.50
1.00
1.00

.4

GRADUATION PIANO RECITAL
Toccata in D Major ................... Bach
Allegro ma non troppo
Allegro
Adagio
Fugato, Adagio, Fugue
Sonata, Op. 22 (G Minor) .........Schumann
Vivacissimo
Andantino
Scherzo
Rondo
Intermezzo, Op. 117, No. 1.........Brahms
Cappriccio, Op. 76, No. 2
Etude, Op. 10, No. 6 ................ Chopin
Etude, Op. 10, No. 7
Impromptu, Op. 36
Burnt Rock Pool .... . ............. Sowerby
Gavotte in G-minor ............... Prokofieff
MARY SPAULDING, for her graduation recital
tomorrow night in the School of Music Audi-
torium, has a program covering the chronological
range of literature, besides containing works that
are unusual and infrequently heard. The Bach
Toccata, for instance, is little known; it was an
experiment in form and rhythms, the adagio in
the last movement, particularly, with its "rubato-
like feeling in tempo." The Burnt Rock Pool is, of
course, American in source and inspiration, the re-
sult of a trip in the North. The Prokofieff will be
done in a serious vein, rather than a satirical one.
as a thing for its own sake, rather than as a
parody of eighteenth century forms.
SONATA RECITAL
FOR LOCKWOOD MEMORIAL
Joseph Brinkman will play three Beethoven
sonatas, the "Pathetique," the "Apassionata," and
the "Hammerklavier," at the Albert Lockwood
Memorial Scholarship Concert, in the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre, Wednesday evening at 8:15 p.m.

-at--

II _

State Street

MainSttrett

I

a

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

(A story with a moral)
"It's a pleasure to meet you."
"You dance divinely."
"My, it's warm in here."
"Shall we sit this one out?"
"Isn't the moon marvelous?"
"Ohhh -I don't act like this with

every 'man."
7. "NO!"
-Wisconsin Daily.
Temple University men are just a bit too promis-
cuous with their protestations of romantic interest
according to the statement of Temple University
co-eds when interviewed on, "Do all men say, 'I
love you'?"
FUTILITY
Leander swam the Hellespont,
Or so they say in fables,
And Hercules, it's rumored, cleaned
Some very dirty stables.
A lad named Caesar came and saw
And conquered most of Gaul;
Ulysses at the fall of Troy
Was there to help the fall.

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