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April 19, 1934 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-04-19

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.THE MICHI-GAN. DAILY

a MICI

GAN DAILY

Musical Events

Va

The Theatre

-,

Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
19331 Io, va~c 44-
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press Is encusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispathces credited to it or
not otherwise credited in thi paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Asistant Postmaster-General.
Supscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$.50. During regular school year by carrier, $3.75; by
Enal,.44.25..
Offices: Student Pubicati&'s Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives,
Inc., 4 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City 80
boylson Street, Boston; 012 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF'
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR......... THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR............C.. HART SCHAA
CIT EDITOR... ........... ...B.ACKL Y SHAW
SPORTS EDITOR........ALBERT H. NEWMAN
DRAMA EDITOR...............JOHN W. PRITCHARD
WOMEN'S EDITOR ....................CAROL J. HANAN
N:"GT EDITORS: A. Ellis Bal, Ralph G. Coulter, William
G. Ferris, John C, Healey, George Van Vleck, E. Jerome
Pettit.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Arthur W. Car-
stens, Roland L. Martin, Marjorie Western.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Marore Beck, Eleanor Blum,
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan.
REPORTERS: C. Bradford Carpenter, Paul J. Elliott,
Courtney A. Evans, John J. Flaherty, Thomas A. Groehn,
John Kerr, Thomas H. Kleene, Bernard B. Levick, David
G. MacDonald, .Joel P. Newman, John M. O'Connell,
Kenneth Parker, William R. Reed, Robert S. Ruwitch
Arthur S. Settle. Jacoh C. Seidel, Marshall D. Silverman,
Arthur M. Taub.-
Dorothy Ger, Jean Hanmer, Florence Harper, Eleanor
Johnson, Ruth Lobs, Josephine McLean, Marjorie Mor-
rison, Sally Place, Rosalie Resnick, Jane Schneider.
BUSINESS STAF "
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER ............W. GRAPTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER ..........BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER..................
..... ...................... CATHARINE MO HENRY
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Noel Tur-
ner; Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Service, Robert Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circula
tion and Contracts, Jack Efroymson.
ASSISTANTS: Milton Kramer, John Ogden, Bernard Re-
enthal, Joe Rothbard, George Atherton.
Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell, Mary Bursey, Peggy Cady,
Virginia Cluff, Patricia Daly, Genevieve Field, Louise
Florz, Doris Qimmy, Betty Greve, Bille Griffiths, Janet
Jackson, Louise Krause, Barbara Morga, Margaret
Mustard, Betty Simonda.
FRESHMAN TRYOUTS: Wlliam Jackson, Louis. Gold-
smith, David Sniffer, William Barndt, Jack Richardson,
Charlei Parker, Ruert Owen, Ted Wohigemuth, Jerome
Grossman, Avnor, Kronenberger, Jim Horiskey, Tom
ClarkeSott, Samuel Beckman, Homer Lathrop, Hall,
.Ross Levin, Willy Tomlinson, Dean Asselin, Lyan1
Bittan, John. Park, Don Hutton, Allen Upso, Richard
Ilardenbrook, Gordon Cohn.1
NIGHT EDTTOR: EMJEROME PETTIT
Michigan Men
And Local Government..
NOW, MORE THAN EVER BEFORE,t
intelligent persons should take an
interest in their government. Especially is this trueI
of college students, for, only by studying present1
day conditions, they will be better able to take on,
the leadership that will soon be theirs.-
The series of radio talks, "Reviving Local Gov-1
ernment," furnishes an excellent opportunity, weI
believe, for everyone to improve his knowledge and
understanding of the subject. The talk Tuesday1
by Prof. Arthur W. Bromage of the University'sc
political science department is a splendid example.
Often looked on as a drab topic, local government
as explained by Professor Bromage is interesting,
even glamorous, in addition to the vital part it
plays in our lives.
It will pay everyone to listen to the subsequentL
addresses in these programs. All of them are by1
persons skilled in affairs of local administration.
And it is with pride that we point to the fact
that prominently among thes persons are Michigan
men: Professor Bromage, Prof. Thomas Reed, and'
Harold M. Smith.
Harold Smith, president of the American Muni-
cipal Association, speaks next week, and Professor'
Reed will conclude the series on June 19.t
These broadcasts are given every Tuesday night
at 7:15 over the blue network of the NBC.

,RDUATION ORGAN RECITAL
Choral Prelude: "My Inmost Heart Doth
Yearn" .........................Bach
"Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring" ........ Bach
Finale from Trio Sonata I ............ Bach
Prelude and Fugue in C minor .......... Bach
Symphony No. II ........... ..... .Vierne
Allegro Risoluto
Scherzo
Choral
Hymn to the Stars (from Seven
Pastels)........ ..........Karg-Elert
Pantomime ..........................Jepson..
Twilight at Fiesole (Harmonies of
Florence Suite)...............Bingham
Toccata, "Thou Art The Rock" ........ Mulet
rrHANE MACDONALD is giving a scholarly, yet
varied and interesting program in his gradua-
tion recital at Hill Auditorium this afternoon. The
Bach Choral Preludes are two of the best known.

GRADUATION PIANO RECITAL
In Review

WINIFRED ARTHUR'S piano recital last night
was one of which she, her teacher, and the
School of Music can be justly proud. Small, and not
possessing many of the pianistic physical attri-
butes, she swept aside all of these "necessary re-
quirements" with consummate ease. Her program
was-one in which there was no chance to let down
or rest; she went on through gaining force and
conviction with each number. A program contain-
ing Beethoven's "Waldstein" sonata and Cesar
Franck's "Prelude Choral and Fugue" is no mean
accomplishment. The delicate shadings and tech-
nlcal difficulties encountered in the Franck num-
ber were met with almost perfection. Miss Arthur
might have easily lost communication with the
audience unless she was aware of the final climax
that she was working for constantly. At no time
did she allow interest to lag and was adroit in
avoiding anti-climaxes.
In the allegro of the Waldstein, Miss Arthur
maintained perfect balance between the delicate,
frail melody and a bass which might be over-
shadowing in its immense proportions. In the
adagio there was continuity abetted by a depth of
tone and a rhythmic precision
In the Brahms Miss Arthur gained new laurels by
interpretations that spelled freedom and a certain
vivaciousness which Brahms meant them to have.
The recital on the whole was one which carried
with it a certain maturity and not the usual school
girl characteristics.
Screen Reflections
AT THE WHITNEY
DOUBLE FEATURE
** "THE SWEETHEART OF SIGMA Cr1"
Viv ... ...............Mary Carlisle
Bob.......... .......Buster Crabbe
Sugar-coated college life with a touch of Fra-
torityism, to the accompaniment of Ted Fio Rita's
orchestra, is what is presented in "The Sweetheart
of Sigma Chi." It is unfortunate that somebody
wrote a good fraternity song that became so pop-
ular that the movies can capitalize on it by
clothing an ordinary college picture in its name.
The joke (if it can be called such) is on the Sigma
Chi's, because the usual college-life-in-the-raw
idea is at their expense this time. However. it
could have been a great deal worse, because the
producers have omitted the customary gushy senti-
ment about the dear old college and have substi-
tuted an almost up-to-date nonchalance. The
sweethear herself, in the person of Mary Carlisle,
has cute little tricks that should appeal not only
to the Sigma Chi's but to anyone who is gullible
in the hands of an over-sexed co-ed. For the fair
sex there is Buster Crabbe. And for the suspense-
lovers there is a good crew race this time instead
of the usual football game.
"DEVIL'S MATE"
With Peggy Shannon, Preston Foster
The movies are still harping on the gangster
regime, and this version of it is almost inexcusable.
Poor acting, poor dialogue, and trite plot are the
predominating characteristics of "Devil's Mate." It
is the story about the young female newspaper re-
porter who exposes the underworld by running
around looking up telephone numbers and people
who are least suspected of being criminals. The
only new thing about it is the way in which the
arch-criminal of the story goes about disposing
of his victims. If you like occult manners of killing
people don't miss this. But if you want to see a
good movie, stay away. -C.B.C.
-_
As Others See It
POLITICAL SYSTEMS AND
THE UNIVERSITY
Official University recognition has been denied
the National Student league by the senate com-
mittee on student affairs, presumably on the
grounds that the league is a Communistic organ-
ization.
Whether this organization is Communistic or
not does not interest us here. We consider the

question rather one of freedom - freedom under
the traditional English and American principles
of freedom of thought, and that new renaissance
of American freedom, the New Deal.
The University of Illinois -if it is a university
in the truest sense of the word - should carry
no particular bias for any nolitical system. Wheth-

COLORFUL LEONTOVICH IS
DRAMA FESTIVAL STAR
VARIOUS PERSONS and one city - Chicago -
claim to have discovered Eugene Leontovich,
famed Russian actress who will star in Robert
Henderson's 1934 Dramatic Festival during the
latter part of May. Echoes of the plaudits which
greeted her following her performance as the
unhappy Grusinskaia in "Grand Hotel" have been
chased by enthusiastic breezes all over the country;
Garbo, it is often admitted, gave, in the film ver-
sion of the play, a pale imitation of the work of
Madame Leontovich.
'he discovery claims have been staked rather
late, for she had been in this country eight years,
most of them lean. She was in a revue, "Revue
Russe" it was called, and it failed after one week.
She was a showgirl at the Winter Garden for a
while, and for two years was buried in a road
company of the old Schubert what's-this, "Blos-
som Time."
She was first noticed on Broadway through
playing in "Candle Light." The management of
"Grand Hotel" saw her in that and recognized her
as the actress for their play, destined to be one
of the greatest successes of recent seasons. It was
a nice piece of recognizing on their part, for Leon-
tovich has risen to the position of one of our
First Actresses. The film people, who have already
coralled her husband Gregory Ratoff, are persis-
tently after her. Both she and her close friend,
Katharine Cornell, have so far persistently refused.
Before "Grand Hotel," however, she often had
barely enough to get along on in New York. But
she had a quiet confidence all the time, and never
worried. Once, with only 10 dollars in her pocket-
book, she used most of it to see a dramatic per-
formance which especially interested her.
Before all this, in Russia, Madame Leontovich,
whose father was a colonel in the Imperial army,
had known great success. During the last two or
three years of the Czarist regime she had played
in the Imperial Theatre, in Moscow. The Czar him-
self gave her a brooch in appreciation of her acting.
The revolution brought tragedy. Her brother and
her first husband, a banker, were killed by the
Bolsheviks. She escaped only by hiding for days
and then making her way to Batoum dressed as. a
peasant. In 1920 she got to Paris and was offered a
part in Gregory Ratoff's theatre there. She took
the part and subsequently married Ratoff.
In America, Madame Leontovich might have
been recognized much earlier, but for one slip-up.
She learns languages easily, and after two years
in America decided to go directly to the office of
Mr. Lee Shubert and tell him so. The speech,
which she had carefully rehearsed, was to run like
this, "Dear Mr. Shubert: My name is Eugeni
Leontovich. I am a good actress. I studied for four
years in the Imperial Dramatic Academy in Mos-
cow. I played leading roles in the Imperial theatre
there and all over Russia. I want a chance to show
you that I am a good actress. No one will give me
a chance, but you will please let me show you
what I can do."
She sat for some time awaiting her turn to see
the busy producer. At last her name was called.
As she entered Mr. Shubert's private office she
passed Mr. Simmons of the Shubert casting forces,
a man with whom she was well acquainted from
previous interviews. Flustered at the thought that
Mr. Simmons might question her daring in going
directly to Mr. Shubert instead of to him, she began
her speech to Mr. Shubert, "Mr. Simmons, I
have-" and then realizing her mistake, she blew
up completely in the speech. She was promptly
ushered out by an amazed Mr. Shubert and a flus-
tered Mr. Simmons. And her recognition was set
back by another two years.
Coegiate Observer
- -~.- - -
By BUD BERNARD
Lower scholastic elegibility requirements for ath-
letes are asked in a resolution passed by the
University of Kansas Men's Student Council and
sent to Big Six officials.
,,* *
A senior at the University of Illinois vouches
for this story: A collegian had been out on a
"tear" one night, and had been assisted home,
much the worse for wear. His friends, before

putting him to bed, coated his body with
vaseline, and covered him with feathers taken
from a pillow. Then they turned on the heat,
closed all the windows and left him. The next
morning when he awoke he caught sight of
himself in the mirror.
"Great Scott!" he said; "in Hell and a bird."
Duke football players who are waiters in a co-ed
dorm are "snubbing" the co-eds because of their
table manners. Even though they haven't gone on
a strike by refusing to wait on table, the athletes
will neither speak to a dormitory co-ed nor dance
with her. ust think what it is to be a sorority
gil
EDUCATION OF A MODERN CO-ED
She learned to love,
She learned to hate,
She learned a Ford
Would. carry eight.
She learned to smoke,
And how to tell
Wood alcohol
By taste or smell.
She learned to coax,
She learned to tease.
She learned new ways
Of making cheese.
She learned to neck,
And break a date,
She's ready now
To graduate.

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Clas sified Directory
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the

Selling by telephone gets results. In many lines
of business, salesmen are finding they can cover
more customers more often-and close more sales
at lower cost-by telephone.
Bell System men have worked out a number
of plans for systematic market coverage by Long
Distance telephone. They have also devised tele-
phone plans for more efficient handling of pro-
duction, purchasing, administration, distribution,
collections.
Because Bell System service is fast, economi-
cal, adaptable to specific needs, business more and
more turns to the telephone.
SETL L TE L I T ON E SYSTEM

WHY NOT SAY "HLLL" To MOTHER ANY) DAD?
-RAT S ARE LOWEST AFTEit 8:30 P. M.
2- - - - --
TH E NOBLE ROAE OFEMICHIGAN
MASCU L IN ITY TE MPORA R ILY D IS-
CA R DED TO P ROD U CE A R IOT OUS
RTU RLES U E CAMPUS LIFE

Fraterity Men
AND Fratters . .

T TE LAFAYETTE," semi - weekly
publication of Lafayette College,
has recently published a series of editorials in an
effort to better conditions in various of the activ-
ities on their campus.
Many of their suggestions apply to this Univer-
sity as well as their own, but it is gratifying to note
that at least one of them does not. One of the first
criticisms made was of a condition on the news-
paper itself. It seems that the office is cluttered
with fraternity-political neophytes who are of little
value to the paper; it is the worthy aim of the
paper to clean up this condition by discouraging
fraternity and class politics in regard to new staff
elections, and to give publicity to these elections.
Our own Daily may have its flaws, but we are
proud that it is an organization in which an inde-
n- ri n h-i t rs r. ,- .,,. . ,-- - 4

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