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April 17, 1934 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-04-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Union Opera
Scheduled To
Open April 24
Comstock To Be Feted At
Gala Opening Of 'With
Colors Flying'
With the initial performance sched-
uled for one week from today, re-
hearsals and ticket sales for the Union
Opera, "With Banners Flying," will go
into their final stages this week. Six
performances of the Opera will be
given, April 24 to 28 inclusive.
In honor of Gov. William A. Com-
stock and Mrs. Comstock, who will be
special guests at the Wednesday night
show, ,the evening will be designated
as Governor's Night, according to an
announcement. In accepting the in-
vitation to attend, Governor Comstock
told of his pleasure on seeing that,
the Union Opera will again be pro-
duced after its four-year lapse.
"These affairs have been so well-
done so many times," he said, "that
they have stimulated widespread and
favorable interest - not only in stu-
dent activities but in the University
as well.
"It is, therefore, good news to me
to learn that this year's production is
to be one of the best ever, and I look
forward to the enjoyment of seeing it
with keen anticipation."
Tickets are selling rapidly, accord-
ing to Allan McCombs, '35, ticket
chairman, and the regular reserved
seats are now on sale by all members
of the student staff of the Union, at
the Union desk, the League, Slater's,
and Wahr's. They may still be ob-
tained for any of the six perform-
ances and in any one of the three
price classes, 55 cents, 88 cents, and
$1.10.
In respect to those special groups
that have reserved blocks of seats,
McCombs said they must be settled
for by tomorrow night or will be re-
turned to the general sale. This ap-
plies to fraternities, sororities, and
similar groups contemplating atten-
dance in a body.
Sale of reserved seats will continue
at the Union through Thursday, after
which the box office will be trans-
ferred to the Whitney Theatre, where
the Opera will be given.
There are still a few openings in the
orchestra which will play for the
production, and students wishing to
apply for these vacancies will report
at 4 p.m. today in the musical events
room of the Union. Six violins, viola,
cello, string bass, piano, drum "and
tympani, french horn, trumpet, trom-
bone, clarinet, oboe, and flute players
may still sign up for the orchestra
at this time.
NOVELLI HERE FOR RESEARCH
Dr. R. B. Novelli of the University
of Buenos Aires arrived yesterday at
Ann Arbor to carry on research at the
pharmacological laboratories of the
University. Dr. Novelli is connected
with the Rockefeller Foundation.

Many Prominent Journalists Foreign Group
Included In Ranks Of Alumni Is Guest Of Mt.

YIHiTOR'S NQ'TE: This is the fifth
' a sries o o articles on distinguished
MEC 1i< al um11ni.
By J)OROTIIY GIES
A ecat nunber of names zioted in
the world of journalism -editors,
feature writers, and foreign corre-
spondents - are those of University
graduates, Many of them began their
careers with work on campus pub-
lications.
Franklin Pierce Adams, '03, fa-
miliar to a world of readers as
"F.P.A." is one of the best known
columnists in America today. He has
been associated with the Chicago
Journal, the New York Evening Mail
and the New York Tribune. He is the
originator of the "Conning Tower,"
famous column of the New York
World. In 1909 Adams collaborated
with O. Henry in writing a musical
comedy, "Lo." He is also the author
of several books.
B ek Edits Tribune
Edward Scott Beck, '93, got a job
as reporter on the Chicago Tribune
in the spring of the 1893 World's Fair.,
Michigan Co-Eds
Return To Campus
DazzingyArrayed
There seems to be only one reason
why the Michigan co-ed goes home
for vacation and that is so she can
return to campus to dazzle all be-
holders with an array of new and
wonderful clothes. Yesterday the
aforementioned co-ed was in her ele-
ment making dramatic entrances into
her classes in the newest of new spring
bonnets and causing havoc among the
mascu'line contingent by appearing on
campus in all the glory of the most
glorious of new spring suits.
According to all reports from the
fashion front (in other words, from
under the clock in Angell Hall) color
has come into its own with a ven-
geance. The most prominent color
for the new spring suit seems to be
chartreuse. We have seen it com-
bined with brown blouses and acces-
sories and one stunning costume com-
bined ,a brilliant yellow suit with the
same dark brown accents.
Another fashion which seems to
have swept the campus off its feet
is the broad-brimmed straw hat. No
longer is such a hat restricted to
garden parties or bridesmaids cos-
tumes, it makes its appearance on
campus with the sportiest of sports
costumes.
And when we say brimmed we don't
refer to a conservative sailor or a
slouched felt but to a brim which
actually waves and flutters in the
breeze. Those we have seen have been
for the most part of very shiny straw
and have been fashioned with the
brim dipping slightly over the right
eye.
Others of the same type are the

Last year he was able to direct the
reporting of the even greater Fair
as managing editor.
Another wcll-known figure in the
newspaper field is Willis J. Abbott,
'84, cditor of the Christian Science
Monitor. He has served as foreign
correspondent for various American
publications, and in that capacity has
interviewed many famous men, in-
cluding Mussolini and Lord Cecil. Ab-
bott was decorated by the govern-
ments of Greece and Rumania for
his work.
Griffith Ogden Ellis. '93L, had a
sick nephew who wanted to read
something written especially for boys.
The result was the American Boy
Magazine, which first appeared in
1899. Ellis has acted as president and
editor-in-chief since its inception.
Pulitzer Prize Winners
Other distinguished American jour-
nalists who are Michigan alumni in-
clude Edgar Ansel Mowrer and Paul
Scott Mowrer, both of whom have
received Pulitzer prizes for their work,
Henry Montgomery, managing edi-
tor of the Detroit Times, and Jabin
Hsu, '14, former member of The
Daily staff and now a journalist of
note in China. Mr. Hsu represented
Chinese newspapers at the World
Press Conference in1921.
Stewart White, '95, is famous as a
writer of short-stories and essays.
In college he won Phi Beta Kappa.
He has spent much of his life in the
west and in Mexico, and has written
40 volumes of fiction, history, and
travel.
Where 1To Go
Motion Pictures: Michigan, "Death
Takes a Holiday" with Frederic
March; Majestic, "Massacre" with
Richard Barthelimess; Wuerth, "Fa-
shion Follies of 1934"; Whitney,
"Sweetheart of Sigma Chi" and "Dev-
il's Maid" with Peggy Shannon.
IDancig: League Grill Room, Den,
Tavern, Hi-Hat Inn, Preketes.
LUNCHEON CLUB POSTPONED
There will be no meeting of the
Dean's Luncheon Club today, it was
announced last night. The group will,
however, meet as usual next week.
mandarin hats which have a brim
turning down all the way around and
which do their best to give the exotic
Oriental touch to the simplest sports
costume.
Dark blue is popular as ever for
spring, one of the smartest coats we
saw being trimmed with fox dyed the
same deep blue. Another very charm-
ing suit consisted of a blue print dress
with a long blue woolen coat com-
pleting the suit. The coat had lapels
and lining of the print.
I- ~ ~ -

Pleasant School
hIterniat ional Dinner, Visi
To Indian College, Parti
Of Vacation Trip
A deputation of 18 foreign students
from the University visited Mount
Pleasant as guests of the Central
State Teachers' College for two and
a half days during the Spring vaca-
tion. The group was chosen from
amongst those who have an interest
in educational problams and who
consequently are interested in mak-
ing contact with the typical Ameri-
can teachers' college.
The deputation included the fol-
lowing students: Emmanuel Menat-
saganian, Persia; Lyman Bothwell,
Porto Rico; Antonio Terrazas, Bo-
livia; C. T. Hsu, China; Jules Halten-
berger, Hungary; Kaoru Hayashi, at-
tache to the Japanese embassy at
Washington; Hasan Rufai and Hus-
sein Saffar, students from Iraq, sent
here on government scholarships; Os-
car Tellez, Peru; Katayun Cama,
Barbour Scholar from India; Shiro
Sashiwa, a Japanese student from
Hawaii; Hsich H. Pin, China; and
Masako Sato.
Entertained At Dinner
The program of entertainment in-
cluded an international dinner Wed-
nesday evening, followed by an open
forum, at Which the Un'iversity stu-
dents appeared in their native cos-
tumes and spoke briefly upon the
reasons for their choice of an Amer-
ican university for the pursuance of
advanced work in education. The
program also included a visit to the
Indian - School in Mount Pleasant,
and this proved to be particularly in-
teresting to the deputation, the ma-
jority of whom had never seen, let
alone contacted, an American Indian,
During the visit, members of the
delegation visited classes in which
they were interested, plans having
been maade previously for Wprtain ones
of them to speak.
Present Program
The deputation presented a pro-
gram Friday at the school, at which
Oscar Tellez, Hsieh Pien, Miss Cama
and Evelyn Coe gave brief talks, and
Miss Masako Sato presented a group
of Japanese dances. During their
stay, the students were guests in var-
ious faculty homes.
Prof. and Mrs. J. Raleigh Nelson
went to Mount Pleasant with the
deputation Wednesday, and Dr. and
Mrs. Edward W. Blakeman joined
the group Thursday.
Dorothy Hall
Wins Desining
Contest Prize
Dorothy Hall, '35, one of the 13
Michigan contestants in the first
Young American Designer's contest,
was recently notified that she had
received sixth prize. The award will
consist of $40 in money and a dress
made according to her own design.
The contest, which closed Jan. 20
was entered by representatives from
254 colleges and universities from
coast to coast. Twenty winners, picked
by a board of style experts, were an-
nounced in a bulletin sent to the Dean
of Women's office. Their awards
ranged from $150 to $10. Miss Anita
Wilson, of Wellesley College was first
prize-winner. She was followed by
representatives from Washington
University, college of St. Catherine,
University of Chicago, University of
California in the first five places.
The dress-design which won Miss
Hall her award was a sport dress,
which according to her description, is
cut along simple lines in a shirt-waist
style. Two of the features of the de-
sign were its short sleeves, patch
pockets, and buttons up both sides of

the waist.
Miss Hall has always been inter-
ested in designing work. She started
by taking two courses in designing in
high school, and has continued by
making, and designing many of her
own ensembles.

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dancing
at the

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8:30 to 10:30
-no cover charge

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Clearance
TUESDAY
ONLY
Jacobson's
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rapt admiration
at the charming

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$3.95-$

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so lovely... so original,-
so distinctive in line and
perfect in fit! All white
or white and brown

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and Als
InTeaRnTionaLLY
famous
ORCHESTRA&
Ded from
CASINO DE PARt
rew 7/ork cty
C. S. .AD1J STA S
nSWCiNCODS
BRINGING

UNION
APRIL27
TICKETS
$3.00
at
R.O.T.C.
Headquarters,

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The Union,

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