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April 03, 1934 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-04-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

__TIEMI CIG ANDAILY

Dean Edmonson
Is Appointed To
Education Board
Commission Plans Study
Of Effect Of Depression
On Public Schools
Dean James B. Edmonson of the
School of Education has again been
appointed a member of the Joint
Commission on the Emergency in
Education, according to an an-
nouncement made yesterday by the
commission. The commission met
during the past week-end to outline
plans for the coming year.
Appointed in 1933 for the purpose
of studying the effect of the four-
year depression on the public schools
of the country, the commission made
its first report at the Minneapolis
meeting in February of that year.
A board of 800 consultants from
every part of the country and rep-
resenting every type of school and
every office and position in educa-
tion was chosen to co-operate with
the commission. Through their ef-
forts a recognition of the gravity of
the present educational crisis was
brought to the American public.
Practical plans for developing and
carrying out measures to protect the
schools against the effects of the
economic crash were the result of re-
gional conferences held during the
past year at representative cities
throughout the nation.
During the summer of 1933, a con-
ference called by the commission
drafted a charter of educational fi-
nance which has been widely used,
since that time as the basis of plans;
to revise methods of school support.
The commission has been active in
securing relief for rural schools from
the FERA and in bringing about the
introduction of 33 bills into the pres-
ent Congress, action on which is now
pending.
Inland Review
Will Continue
Campus Sales
The Inland Review, new literary
and critical quarterly magazine, ap-
peared on the campus for the first
time yesterday. The sale will continue
today.
The initial issue of the publication
contains articles on varied subjects,
the greater part of which have been
written by students. In addition to
articles purely literary there are two
widely divergent from this type.
Charles Andrew Orr, a teaching fel-
low in the economics department,
discusses the growth of campus rad-
icalism in an article entitled "Build-
ing a New World." Joseph Carl Sei-
del, director of the Art Cinema
League, attempts to point out why
Sergei - M. Eisenstein, dean of the
Russian film directors, has enjoyed
such favorable criticism of his work.
The title of this discussion is "Eisen-
stein and The Soviet Cinema."
Contributors of other articles are
Robert Warshow, '37, winner of the
first prize in the poetry division of
this year's Freshman Hopwood
Awards; T. C. Wilson, Grad., author
of several articles in national literary
magazines; Otto Bird, '35; Dorothy
Vale, '37; and Theodore Kane Cohen,
'35, Hopwood Award winner in both
1932 and 1933.
Valerie Gates Stevens, Herbert

Schwartz, and Ezra Pound have con-
tributed poems. Athur J. Carr, '35,
reviews Mildred Walker's Hopwood
prize winning novel, "Fireweed,"
Subscriptions for the Inland Re-
view of four quarterly issues are one
dollar. They may be obtained by
sending the required amount to the
office of the English department,
3221 Angell Hall, or to 1024 Hill
Street.
Sees Success
In'White Cross,
Seal Campaign
The sale of White Cross seals for
the benefit of crippled children was
reported progressing yesterday by
Wilfred B. Shaw, Rotary Club pres-
ident, in charge of the campaign.
Favorable reports from clubs,
churches, and schools have been
made, and Mr. Shaw expects about
100,000 seals to be sold in the county.
The receipts of the campaign, last-
ing from Monday until Saturday, will
be equally divided between the Wash-
tenaw Counety Society for Crippled
Children and state and national so-
cieities.
I I , e #~~uid A 4i k.,h.Uf I

Giant Sikorsky Flying Boat Proves Airworthy In Test

Historian Discounts
1 European War Fear
NEW YORK, April 1.-(P) -
The dangers of a European war, at
least in the immediate future, have
been greatly exaggerated, in the
opinion of James Truslow Adams,
historian and Pulitzer prize winner,
who paused here on his way from
London to Washington.
"And it's not because several na-
tions of Europe might not want to
make war," Adams said, "but be-
cause they cannot.
"England can't make war because
at present the people wouldn't stand
for it. Unless it were perfectly ob-
vious to every man in the street that
the life of the British Empire was at
stake, the first result of any declara-
tion of war would be a general
strike."

SEE
RIDER,
for PENS
302 South State Street 1

PRICES THAT WILL PLEASE YOU!
THE ATHENS PRESS
Dowtown -- 206 North Main St.
Dial 2-1013 Next to Downtown Postoffice
Typewriting Paper at Reduced Prices

',;
Ii
'I

Even Finer Bt

isses

New Schedule

Faster Service

Effective April 3

L 7"I-I I
w
' rN

-Associated Press Photo
The giant flying boat S-42, built by Sikorsky for Pan-American Airways, is shown as it proved itself
airworthy on a test flight over Bridgeport, Conn. The plane, powered by four engines and capable of
flying 2,500 miles non-stop with a mail load and crew, was planned as America's largest passenger plane.
It is 76 feet long, has a wing spread of 114 feet, and has a gross weight of 38,000 pounds. It will be
fitted with 32 passenger seats for the South American service.

1

Local Professors Return
From Chemical Meeting
Professors Hobart H. Willard, Jo-
seph 0. Halford, and John R. Bates,
of the chemistry department, re-
turned yesterday from the semi-an-
nual meeting of the American Chem-

I

ical Society, held at St. Petersburg,
Fla.
A paper on "Exchange Relations
Involving Deuterium" (heavy water),
written by Professor Bates, Professor
Halford, and Prof. L. C. Anderson, of
the chemistry department, and one
on strontium, by Professor Willard
were read.

- A SU BWAY
727 1"

fr

Type of Coaches Now in Service between Toledo, Ann Arbor, Flint
4 ROUND TRIPS SUNDAYS AND
WEEK DAYS 5 HOLIDAYS

450ROUND
chleengoTRIP
SPECIAL STUDENT RATE - THREE FAST
DE LUXE COACHES DAILY
CAMPUS.TRAVEL BUREAU -- CHUBB'S 12-8 P.M.

DESSERT
'INCLUDED
rCOFFEE SHOP
North University .

U

TOLEDO'
1 Hour 55 Minutes
$1.75 One Way
$2.65 Round Trip

FLINT
1 Hour 30 Minutes
$2.00 One Way
$3.00 Round Trip

40

F +I

Campus Agent -- JOHN BOLLOCK - Michigan Union
Downtown: Union Bus Depot - Phone 3589

k II
f':

READ THE DAILY CLASSIFIED ADS

__ ___

VIII

_________________________________________________________________ -S.,

O ctenieetwes... $zey care leAA/Iestlecwes
uckies are All-Ways kind to your throat

W HEREVER the finest tobaccos grow-
in our own Southland, in Turkey, in
Greece-all over the world, we gather the very
Cream of the tobacco Crops for Lucky Strike.
And that means only the center leaves Not the
top leaves-because those are under-developed
-not ripe. Not the bottom leaves - because
those are inferior in quality-they grow close
to the ground, are coarse, dirt-covered, sandy.

The center leaves are the mildest leaves-they
taste' better and farmers are paid higher prices
for them. These center leaves are the only ones
used in making Luckies. Then "It's toasted"
-for throat protection. And every Lucky is
fully packed with these choice tobaccos-
made round and firm, free from loose ends-
that's why Luckies do not dry out. Naturally,
Luckies are all-wa kind to your throat.
NOT the top leaves-they're under-develoied

"It's toasted"
ILuckies are all-ways kind to your throat

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