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April 01, 1934 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1934-04-01

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

MICHIGAN DAILY

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III

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-:7- _
ruolusneo every morning except Monday during the
an>versIty year and Summer Sessio by the Board in
' otrl of student Publications.
Mewbei of the Western Conference Editorial Association
aod tne-Big Ten News Service
Saiciated d o iatt resz
~ - -I933 NATIoI4-.' O vwte 1934
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ibe Associated Press is enclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispathces credited to it or
not otherwise credited in thi paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the fost Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
seconft class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Aaistant Postmaster-General.
SvIbscrition during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $3.75; by
mail, $4.25
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
inn Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives,
inc., 4G East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylson Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR .........THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR..............C. HART SCHAAF
CITY EDITOR ...................... BRACKLEY SHAW
SPORTS EDITOR ..................ALBERT H. NEWMAN
DRAMA EDITOR...................JOHN W. PRITCHARD
WOMEN'S EDITOR...................CAROL J. HANAN
0IGHT EDITORS: A. Ellis Ball, Ralph G. Coulter, William
G. Ferris, John C. Healey, George Van Vleck; Guy M.
Whippie, Jr.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Arthur W. Car-
stens, Roland L. Martin, Marjorie Western.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Beck, Eleanor Blum,
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan.
REPORTERS: C. Bradford Carpenter, Paul J. Elliott,
Courtney A. Evans, John J. Flaherty, Thomas A. Groehn,
John Kerr, Thomas H. Kleene, Bernard B. Levick, David
G. MacDonald, Joel P. Newman, John M. O'Connell,
Kenneth Parker, William R. Reed, Robert S. Ruwitch,
Arthur S. Settle, Marshall D. Silverman, Arthur M.
Taub.
Dorothy Gie, Jean Hanmer, Florence Harper, Eleanor
Johnson, Ruth Loebs, Josephine McLean, Marjorie Mor-
rison, Sally Place, RosalieResnick, Jane Schneider.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER . ...W. GRAFTON SHARP
CR IT MANAGER . . BERNARD E. SCHNAKE
rWOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER...................
... .................... CATHARINE MC HENRY
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Noel Tur-
ner; Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Service, Robert ward; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circula-
S tion and Contracts, Jack Efroymson.
ASSISTANTS: Milton Kramer, John Ogden, Bernard Ros-
Ro-enthal, Joe Rothbard,-George Atherton.
Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell, Mary Bursley, Peggy Cady,
Virginia Cluff, Patricia Daly, Genevieve Field, Louise
Fiorez, Doris Gimmy, Betty Greve, Billie Griffiths, Janet
Jackson, Louise Krause, Barbara Morgan, Margaret
Mustard. Betty Simonds.
FRESHMAN TRYOUTS: William Jackson, Louis Gold-
smith, David Schiffer, William Barndt, Jack Richardson,
Charles' Parker, Robert Owen, Ted Wohlgemuth, Jerome
Grossman, Avner, Kronenberger, Jim Horiskey, Tom
Clarke, Scott, Samuel Beckman, Homer Lathrop, Hall,
Ross Levin, Willy Tomlinson, Dean Asselin, Lyman
Bittman, John Park, Don Hutton, Allen Ulpson, Richard
Hardenbrook, Gordon Cohn.
v
NIGHT EDITOR: A. ELLIS BALL
Vote "Yes" For
East Side.Beer . . .
'f HE most controversial question that
has arisen with the return of beer
to Ann Arbor will be settled tomorrow. Whether
or not the city should be divided by a line extend-
ing from one end of the city to the other, on one
side of which beer may be sold, and on the other
may not, has been a subject of recurrent debate.
Since long before the era of prohibition, Division
Street has divided the city into East and West
sides. On the West Side, beer has been permitted.
On the East Side, however, beer has been pro-
hibited from sale for consumption on the premises.
Those who have favored the retention of the
dividing line contend that the availability of beer
in the campus area will be an undesirable influence
on students, Those who favor the elimination of
the line point out that such an attitude is exag-
gerated paternalism,
A survey of the prominent campuses of the
country conducted by The Daily has revealed that
no such effects have resulted anywhere as the
opponents of the amendment have feared.
After many months of agitation, the proponents
of the amendment circulated petitions which,
although ruled illegal on a technicality, revealed
a strong sentiment for it. The council, in the face
of such evidence, drew up the amendment to the
charter to revoke the division line to submit to
the people.

It behooves the citizens of Ann Arbor to express
themselves on this matter at the polls tomorrow.
The council, the students, and every resident of the
city await with interest the decision of the elec-
torate.
The question, as stated on the ballot, is cap-
tioned, "Proposed Amendment of Section.88, Third
Paragraph, of the Charter." It is merely a repeti-
tion of the measure as it stands, omitting the
sentence that refers to the dividing line. This
means that if you desire to se the Division Street
line eliminated, simply vote "Yes." The Daily
firmly and honestly believes that a Yes vote is the
right vote.
Repubblcans
Betray Themselves..,
E FFORTS of republican publicists to
make the Grand Old Party appear
as the bulwark of sound money and old-fashioned
American principles around which the people,

to March 19, 1933; and ti also returns five per cent
of their 15 per cent pay cut to government officials
and employees.
The bill adds $228,000,000 to the regular budget.
It is an expense which neither the president nor
his advisers believe advisable or warranted.
Here, then, was an issue upon which the repub-
licans could take a strong stand for sound finance
and a balanced budget. They could come to the
aid of that portion of the Democratic Party which
indicated its willingness to stand by the President.
They could vote to sustain the presidential veto.
What actually happened? The republicans in the
Senate, voting as one solid group, cast 30 votes
for overriding the veto; the republicans in the
House voted 97 for overriding and only two for
sustaining.
The conclusion is obvious enough: the Republi-
can Party's high and holy howls bout sound
finance, including those of the pious Simeon Fess
himself, are pure political claptrap, and the party,
given the opportunity, is as hell-bent for the
veterans' vote as a southern church deacon for his
bottle.
Musical Events
IS
FACULTY RECITAL
THIS AFTERNOON
Overture to Russian
Easter" ................ Rimsy-Korsakov
Prelude to "Parsifal"...............Wagner
University Symphony Orchestra
Concerto in B-flat minor for piano and
orchestra .................. Tschaikovsky
Allegro non troppo e maestoso
Allegro con spirito
Andantino semplice
Allegro con fuoco
Mabel Ross Rhead
and the orchestra
The orchestra is under the direction of Earl
V. Moore.
THE mood of Rimsky-Korsakov's "Russian Eas-
ter" is one not usually associated with the
season. It is bizarre, itense, even pagan.
In direct contrast to this is the "Prelude" to
Parsifal, act one, which opens with a tranquility
and dignity, rises to a climax, and returns, in
the concert piece, to the original mood.
Mrs. Rhead will bring the necessary intellectual
and emotional approach to the performance of
the Tschaikovsky Concerto, with its interesting
and powerful contrasts.
-W, P.
BAND CONCERT
TOMORROW NIGHT
The Falcone brothers will share the honors on
tomorrow night's band program, with Joseph
Brinkman, pianist. Leonard Falcone will direct
the premiere of Nicholas Falcone's arrangement
of the Liszt "Hungarian Rhapsody" for piano and
band, with Mr. Brinkman at the piano. Last
spring the latter performed Leonard Falcone's
arrangement of the Borghi Concerto in D with
the band, Nicholas Falcone conducting. Other
transcriptions from orchestral music will com-
plete the program.
VIOLINIST'S
GRADUATION RECITAL
Elizabeth Allsop Leslie, of Providence, Rhode
Island, will appear in her graduation recital,
Tuesday evening, in the Choral Union Auditorium
at 8:15 p.m. Raymond Kondratowicz will act
as her accompanist.
~+ S
Caempus Opinion
A -SA
Letters published in this column should not be con-
strued as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disregarded.
The names of communicants will, however, be re-
garded as confidential upon request. Contributors
are asked to be brief, confining themselves to less
than 300 words if possible.
BEER ENTHUSIASTS
ACT IN BAD FAITH
To the Editor:
I want to protest against the complete mis-
interpretation of at least one ministerial inter-
view. I am not in favor of dispensing beer in the
Union or at any place where students are accus-

tomed to eat. I am not in favor of revising the
city charter but in favor of further zoning ordi-
nances which would restrict beer gardens to a
downtown business area where they could be
easily policed and supervised and so not discrimi-
nate in favor of any residential area. I thought
I made myself perfectly clear on both of these
questions as well as the basis of my opinion. In
the current beer column of March 31 I am com-
pletely misinterpreted in the interest of the Daily's
position on these questions.
--Alfred Lee Klaer
ROOSEVELT IS NOT
A SOCIALIST
To the Editor:
It seems difficult to reconcile the apparent con-
tradiction between your editorial point of view in
"Mr. Farley and his Racket" that President Roose-
velt has had a "constructive Socialist Program"
and the declaration of faith in capitalism made
by Secretary Perkins, reputedly one of the most
liberal members of the cabinet. Unless the sordid
interpretation of "good politician" as given in the
editorial is to be stretched to cover Madame Sec-
retary, this contradiction remains insoluble.
Another possibility is the loose and incorrect
understanding and use of "socialism" in your
editorial. If Roosevelt has no socialist program
the contradiction disappears and with it one can
can restore both to President Roosevelt and to
Secretary Perkins not only honesty and integrity
of statement but also consistency and understand-
ing of Socialism.
Perhaps the editorial has fallen into the vulgar
and common error of supposing that any hu-
manitarian reformistic attempt to redistribute in-

Screen Reflections
AT THE MAJESTIC
Plus "GEORGE WHITE'S SCANDALS"
Stew ........................Cliff Edwards
Kitty ...........................Alice Faye
Happy .................... Jimmy Durante
Jimmy .......................Rudy Vallee
Created, conceived, directed by George White
In spite of the lavishness of the settings and
the galaxy of star names secured for "George
White's Scandals," the film on the whole is rather
dull and disappointing to anyone who has seen
other screen musical extravaganzas, and to those
who happen to have seen any of the "Scandals"
on the stage. It is only fair to Mr. White to give
him credit for his hard work and obviouseattempt
to make this a hit film, but he seems not to have
realized yet that the movies are a medium en-
tirely different from the stage. While the former
benefits greatly from the latter's experience, a
too orthodox transposition of the material from
one to the other almost inevitably retards the
success of the film.
Granted that there are episodes in the film
which, when taken as units, make for excellent
comedy, the pace or progression of the film viewed
as an integrated whole is too slow, too stereo-
typed, too mechanical, and too uninspired. Per-
haps this reviewer did not enter into the spirit
of the thing and, expecting it to live up to the
praise given to it in other papers, looked for too
much. This is truly possible, but don't take his
word for it. Go and see for yourselves.
The outline-story - for the story is really
nothing but an outline - acquaints us with the
stock characters of the movies: the beautiful
leading lady, Miss Faye; the blue-eyed hero, Mr.
Vallee; the chief comic, Mr. Durante; the juven-
iles, Miss Dunbar and Cliff Edwards; and the
menace, Miss Ames. There is no attempt at
characterization. George White takes the role of
himself. Jimmy goes ga-ga over a wealthy tobacco
manufacturer's daughter, leaving Kitty broken-
hearted. Mr. White reveals to him that she is
only a publicity seeker who has tied up with
other celebrities in the past. Jimmy sees the light,
goes back to Kitty and everybody is happy and
can go home and sleep it off. I'll wager .at least
10 highly priced scenario writers lay awake nights
thinking this one up.
Rudy Vallee is no more than a puppet. It is
surprising how he can actually go through approx-
imately seven and a half reels of film without
registering at least the more common emotions.
In my opinion, it is Cliff Edwards who steals the
show with his burlesquing of Henry Laughton's
characterization in "Henry the Eighth." Jimmy
Durante is as usual funny, but not enough to rave
about. The real revelation of the film was the
position it wisely gave to Alice Faye. Here is a
new young actress that can sing, dance - I beg
our pardon - shake those hips, and act. When-
ever she and Rudy Vallee appear together for a
shot, he fades into obscurity as this young lady's
personality charms and brightens up the expiring
audience's faces. The film has some good musical
numbers, especially a novelty called "You Nasty
Man." As sung and wiggled by Miss Faye, every-
one is sure to like it. -J. C. S.
Collegiate Observer
By BUD BERNARD
A professor at Creighton University gave his
classes a few hints on how to crib. He said by far
the most ingenious method he ever saw was the
Harvard Roll. The crib notes were typed in a roll
and enclosed in a watch case so that the stem
would wind the roll. The professor noticed one
time that a student was looking at his watch
rather frequently and winding it more frequently
than seemed necessary, and at last he asked to
look at the watch. The watch was harmless, but
later they learned that the clever student was
just clever enough to come prepared for such an
emergency with two watches.
* * *
One of the less intelligent co-eds in Political
Science at Ohio State University wanted to
know if the Congressional Record was the
record held by the most long-winded con-

gressman.
* * *
Marriage is the most crowded profession in the
world and the least prepared for, said a recent
speaker at Miami College. If there were more
preparation for it the results wouldn't be so
crowded, we think.
We agree with the V.P.I. Skipper that a
smart girl is one who can make her com-
plexion taste as good as it looks.
* * *
The John Hopkins News Letter tells the story
of a pre-med student at Boston University who
dropped biology because of incompatability. The
first day the professor cut up an apple, and when
finished told the class to eat the apple; the second
day he cut up a watermelon and they ate that;
the third day the professor brought in a cat.
Add this to your list of similies: As con-
ceited as a senior who works a cross word
puzzle in ink.
* * *
Students at Bucknell are agitating to get a
trained nurse in the book stores to administer
smelling salts when prices are quoted.
controlled, and does not provide a substantially
equal income to the workers in these fields.
Oscar Ameringer, that veteran Socialist editor
of the American Guardian, has very tersely stated
the orthodoxy of the President thus:
A. President Roosevelt is as far from being a
Fascist as Hitler is from being a Rabbi.
B. President Roosevelt is as far from being a

- -

PA L

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V
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For the convenience of those who are contemplating

'7l W

a trip abroad this summer or in the near future, the
Daily has compiled on pages six and seven, a most
interesting and informative collection of articles on interesting
corners of the world as well as interviews with renowned campus
globe trotters on what they consider places to be visited in a
cultural tour of Europe.
itti

--- 11

Just Ready--
A SHORT HISTORY
of the

UNIVERSITY

OF MICHIGAN

By WILFRED B. SHAW
$1.25
UNIVERSITY
W ,A .RD S BOOKSTORE
316 STATE STRELET

El I '

Y

HILL AUDITORIUM

, vTn4

Wednesday Evening, May 9
ROSA PONSELLE ............ . .... .... .
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK. . ........ ..... . .

.....Soprano
..Conductor

Thursday Evening, May 10
THE "SEASONS" .... . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... ..... .. . . .. Hadyn
JEANNETTE VREELAND...............................Soprano
PAUL ALTHOUSE .......... ..........Tenor
CHASE BAROMEO........................................Bass
PALMER CHRISTIAN..................................Organist
MISCHA LEVITZKI Pianist
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
EARL V. MOORE and FREDERICK STOCK ...............Conductors
Friday Afternoon, May 11
GUILA BUSTABO ...Violinist
"THE UGLY DUCKLING" . Granville English
BY THE WATERS OF BABYLON ......... . .. Loeffler
YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS - THE STANLEY CHORUS
ORCHESTRAL ACCOMPANIMENT
ERIC DELAMARTER and JUVA HIGBEE.. Conductors
Friday Evening, May 11
LUCREZIA BORI......................................Soprano
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK . Conductor
Saturday Afternoon, May 12
"NINTH SYMPHONY" Beethoven
JEANETTE VREELAND . Soprano
COE GLADE ..................................... Contralto
ARTHUR HACKETT...............................Tenor
THEODORE WEBB.. Baritone
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
FREDERICK STOCK.....................Conductor

Saturday Evening, May 12
"A SONG OF PEACE" (Ein Friedenslied).
JEANETTE VREELAND.
COE GLADE ............
PAUL ALTHOUSE............
CHASE BAROMEO ...................
PALMER CHRISTIAN.s.
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
T TNTVJIRCDTTV CT RORAT T NTOCN

Heger
Soprano
Contralto
.. Tenor
.-Bass
Organist

ii

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