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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 25, 1934 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-03-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

MICHIGAN DAILY

I i

away from the gloomy, humdrum, city life they
lead and give them a chance to build their minds'
and bodies to healthy states out in the fresh air.
We all want to help some of these boys get this
opportunity, and the way to do it is to attend
the All-Campus Jamboree Tuesday night in Hill
Auditorium. It is an extraordinary drive for sup-
port in that you will actually get more for your
money than you would expect. Talent of all
sorts has been recruited to furnish their services
to this undertaking gratis and all prominent or-
ganizations are lending their backing.
If you go you will have an evening's entertain-
ment that will be difficult to equal, and, in addi-
tion, you will be making a contribution to human
welfare.
We urge all students and,.faculty members to
lend their fullest support to this drive. All you
have to do is round up the gang Tuesday night
and come down to Hill Auditorium, assured that
you will have a good time. And when you get

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Musical Events

3

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Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.

JOHNSON TO RE SOLOIST
WITH CADILLAC SYMPHONY
EDWARD JOHNSON, eminent tenor of the
Metropolitan Opera Association, and Ernest
MacMillan, conductor of the Toronto Symphony
Orchestra, will appear with the Cadillac Sym-
phony Orchestra Sunday, March 18, at 6 p.m.,
E.S.T., over the Blue Network of NBC. In pre-
senting two of Canada's renowned musicians in
the fourteenth of the Sunday symphonic recitals,
the Cadillac Concerts continue to feature the
world's most distinguished conductors and solo-
ists.
Mr. Johnson begins his program with the im-
mortal Prize Song from Wagner's "Die Meister-
singer," and continues his selections with two
other greatly beloved operatic arias: the Flower
Song from Bizet's "Carmen," and "How Cold Your
Little Hand," from "La Boheme" of Puccini.
COMING EVENTS
All-campus Jamboree with special musical con-
tributions by the Varsity Band, the Varsity Glee
Club, and the Ukranian Choir from Detroit, Don't
miss it.
Screen Reflections

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FIRST NATIONAL BANK
AND TRUST COMPANY
1:stab shed 1863
Oldest Notionol Bonk
In Michigan
Every Banking Service Avoilable
Domestic - - - Foteign
Under U. S. (overnment supervision
Member Federal Reserve System

H i l l Aud.

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Hear
DR. FREDERICK B.
FISHER
every evening at 7:30 in a discussion
of 1.11 vital problems of modern ulfe.
ALBERT E. BUSS
Soloist and song Leader
FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
A Community Cathedrai
STATE AND WASHINGTON

50c Mar. 27

ALL-CAMPUS JAMBOREE
J. FRED LAWTON

$554ciadrt! F £ollcgiatt ryour ticket, you will know that you are making
!.icia' O _ an investment in better citizenry-providing some
boy with a chance to develop mentally and physi-
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS cally that otherwise might never come to him.
The Associated Press is enchlsively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispathces credited to it or "_ - - ------
not otherwise credited in th paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special W ashrngtrvd
nere trat ~the ost Ofice at Ann Arbor, M101iigZt, a X ashington
vecond class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
T'hird Amsistant Postmaster-General.c
Sxsecrition during summer y carrier, $1.00: by mail,
$1.50. Durin~g regtilar school year by carrier, $3.15; by ai,$..y
mail, $4.25.
Otices: Student Publicatibhs Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.BySGRDAN
Reprentatives: College Publications Representatives, By SIGRID ARNE
In., 4G East Thirty-Fourth Street, New Yori: City 80 WASHINGTON (A') - The woman sitting next
Boylson Street, ]Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue, vtCheJuic CarsEanHgest
Chicago.EDTRA AF to Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes at
EITORIAL STAFF a dinner grew tired of calling him "Mr. Chief
'Teiephlone 492.'
MANAGtNG EDITOR ..........THOMAS X. CONNELLAN Justice."
EDIORIAL DIRECTOR ..........C. HART SCHAAF She smiled and asked if there were not some
PRTY EDITOR...............ALBERWT H. NEWMN other title which would be just as proper, butI
DR1AMA EDITOR...........JOHN W. PRITCHARD shorter.
WOMEN'S EDITOR................CAROL J. HANAN
T- - Mr. Hughes solemnly announced that precedent
WGT EDITORS: A,.J . s alal, Ralph 0. Couter, Wlliam had been set by former Chief Justice Edward
0. Perris, John C. 7iealey, George Van VileekI, Guy M.
Wbipple, Jr. Douglas White.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Artumr W. Car- It seems that at another dinner another woman
stens, Roland L. Martin, Marjorie Wetern. rebelled at "Mr. Chief Justice-ing."
WOM tE'S A SIyTANT: Ma.jor f .Peck,lio i r Blum, "It's such a nuisance," she said. "What do
Lols Jotter, Mtarl i Murp}ly, Marartet D. Phlanlil. your friends call you?"
REPORTERS: C..Bradford Carpenter, Paul J. Elliott, j"Madam," said Justice White, "they call me
Courtney A..Evans, John J. Flaherty, Thomas A. Groehn, I
John Kerr. ThomasH .Xlt ene..* n Brr1 T. ro B eUY L AL

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AT THE MAJESTIC
"THE WORLD CHANGES"

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1.11112, ill Sn. w i, zerna rs . evjck, D.avicl
0. Djaconald, Joel P.. Newman, John M. O'Connell,
KennethiParker, William R. eed, Robert S. Ruiwitel,
lA i- 9. 9ettle, Marshall D. Slverman. Arthur M.
Dorothy les, Jen Ham i t r, I' lootnec harper, Eleanorj
Jornsn, Ruth Loebs, Josepline McLean, Marjorie Moi-
rison, Sally Phace, Rosalie Resnick, Jane Schneider.
BUSINESS STAfF r
Telepbone 2-214
vusJfl31:S8 ;MANAGER ..........W. (iR~AP'ION 4SHARP
OR IT MANAR .....A......FRNARD E. SIINACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER.................
..........CATHARINE MC HENRY
DEPARTMENT MANAGisS: rLocal Adlverti!Jing, Nol Tier-
ner; Classified Advertising. Rus.il Read; Advriing
service, Robert Ward; Accounts, Alen Kuui; Cire iu-
tion and Contracts, Jack Efroymson.

VICE PRESIDENT GARNER is smoking cigars
which come done up separately in little wood-
ell boxes.

3
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I (EPRESENTATIVE TINKHAM of Massachu-
setts is still grumbling because he flew 12,000
miles last summer and gained neither of his two
objectives,
He wanted to bring home a Bengal tiger.
And he wanted to ride along with a company of
Japanese soldiers on a campaign.
The tigers kept to cover when Tinklam hit

AloSS KrmeS: Milton , il J Oglen, rlunad l)s- the jungle. And the J a p a n e s e governmentI
t l, tJo., hutr lard , Clege Ath etrtof,. irowned on permitting a 64-year-old American
Jane Basset, Virgii e, Mary hluraley, Peggy Ca. congressman to amble about, in a fighting zone.
V' i n~ia 3Cirl, I-Th~l "ia 1Daly, (("l;v veF ld l ol uise
'ci'rz, Doris luimmy, Betty revc, lililie (irbim. ,I anct
.arekson, ioiilie Rrusu.e, Barbara Morgan, Martu-ct I
MuItard, Betty Simonds. ' AYOR LA GUARDIA of New York never per-
mitted more than a one-line biography of
FRESHMAN TRYOUTS: William Jackson, Louis Gold- himself in the Congressional Directory when he1
smith, David Schiffer, William Barndt, Jack Richardson,
Charles Parker, Robert Owen, Ted Wohlgemuth, Jerome was a member of the house.
Grossman, Avner, Kronenbergcr, Jim Horiskey, Tom
Clarke, Scott, Samuel Beckman, Hoer Lathrop, Hall,
iHttman, John Park, Don Hutton, Allen Ulpson, hicharcl HE power of suggestion was demonstrated am-
hlardenbrook, Gordon Cohn. I 'xha .i..,n. +hn. 1T Dn A

NIGHT EDITOR: GEORGE VAN VLECK
The Judiciary Commitlee
Opens The Door. ..
M EETINGS of the Interfraternity
Council's Judiciary Committee are
to be open to anyone interested in attending, as
the result of a recent action of the committee.
We wish heartily to commend its members for
realizing that it will secure more co-operation
from the fraternities by killing the ogre of "dean's
office control," which has been haunting the de-
liberations of the Interfraternity Council.
Whether or not the dean of students has in
large measure dominated the actions of the Ju-
diciary Committee in the past is a question which
no one can answer except the members of the
committee themselves. They have said that the
undergraduate sentiment has been carefully con-
sidered at all times, and that there has been no
domination by the dean; we are inclined to be-
lieve them.
Therefore, we are happy to record the end of
a period of insinuation which was caused by the
secrecy, now removed. In the light of the im-
portance of the actions which the committee is
empowered to take, it is difficult to understand
how the secrecy lasted as long as it did.
We also hope that this will end a period of sus-
picion on the part of the fraternities of the ob-
jects which the dean has had in all his dealings
with the fraternities.
The objective has been to strengthen the syst m!
at every turn, but to strengthen it through the
"steadying hand of older counsellors."
The fraternities want to be strong, too; but
they believe that a symptom of that strength
would be being allowed to run their houses ex-f
actly as they please. There is no difference in
the ends which the two have. There is a real
difference in the means by which this common end
is to be accomplished.
We regard the end of secrecy for Judiciary Com-
mittee meetings as the first step by which the
dean and houses can stop suspecting each other
and pull together to improve the situation now
confronting fra ternities on the scholastic, the
social, and the financial fronts.

piy here wnen the NrA coce hnearings took
place for the exterminating, fumigating and dis-
infecting trade.
William 0. Buettner, president of the indus-
try's national organization, opened with an ad-
dress detailing the work of the group.
Before he was half through, many of his listen-
ers were indulging, unconsciously, in a little
scratching.
W HETHER the gentlemen are aware of it or
not, there is an increasing number of blonde
waitresses in one of the dining rooms on capitol
hill.
The managerhas issued a flat order than when
a brunette leaves she is to be replaced by a blonde.
SENATOR ROBERT J. BULKLEY of Ohio at-
tended a White House reception alone. As he
entered the double line which forms to shakeE
hands with the President he encountered Repre-
sentative Mary Norton.
Together they approached the announcer.
"Name, please?" he asked.
"Representative Norton," said the lady from
New Jersey.
Sweeping Senator Buckley with a blank gaze,
the announcer said in loud, clear tones to the
President:
"Representative and Mrs. Norton."

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Orin Nordholm .............Paul Muni
Anna Nordholm ...... Aline MacMahon
Virginia.................Mary Astor
A super-colossal, gigantic epic is what the movie
press agents would call "The World Changes."
It does attempt, in a Hollywood way, to be just
that, but the results are a melodramatic con-
coction that is mediocre, at times lurid, and far
below the standard that a picture starring Paui
Muni should maintain.
The action of the story starts in 1850 in the
Dakota Territory as Orin Nordholm, senior, and
his wife, Anna, stop their covered wagon and de-
cide to settle in a fertile plain and raise their
about-to-be-born son. They are joined by other
families, and eventually the town Qrinville is es-
tablished. Their son grows up, becomes fired
with ambition, and leaves town to take advantage
of the opportunities offered in cattle trading. He
eventualy becomes one of the greatest meat pack-
ers in the country in Chicago. The plot con-
tinues up to the present time, introducing tragedy
after tragedy into the life of this phlegmatic old
man whose children have all become wishy-washy
social climbers.
"The World Changes" contains a pot-pourri of
scenes, characters. and incidents that are not
very well organized and do not have the potency
that is necessary to make a picture of its type ef-
fective. Instead, it is tiring and ordinary. There
are parts that are genuine and worth while, in-
cluding some of the earlier scenes in the west
and some in the portrayal of Orin's marriage life.
There are moments of potentially good comedy,
but instead of accentuating the main theme, they
detract from it. Paul Muni d'eserves a good share
of praise, because his characterization would be
exceptional if he had not been the victim of bad
direction. Aline MacMahon gives a good perform-
ance both as the young pioneer and the old great-
grandmother. Mary Astor, Guy Kibbee, and some
of the other minor characters do well, although
some of the other performances are nothing other
than awful.
If you like "Did You Ever See a Dream Walk-
ing?" you had better stay away from the Para-
mount Pictorial which gives a glimpse of its com-
posers. And if you like Lillian Roth's hips and
warble, deny yourself the agony of seeing her in
the very bad short about song writing. We'll
let you stay for the news reel, however, because,
although there is nothing stirring or unusual in
it, it is better than the other added attractions.
-®C. B. C.
AT THE WHITNEY
"MASTER OF MEN"
.A rvrrnMTNU

PA

I'M - ...._. _.. __... . _.____ __

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mmim

.9

READ THE DAILY CLASSIFIED ADS

,... ..
__ _ _ _ _ -

State Street

AIW
CM&

Min Street

Easter Only One Week Awa
Ifyou lave in mmd
BOOKS, Devotional or Otherwise
We shall be happy indeed to show you what our two large stores
have to offer- BIBLES OF EVERY VERSION (King James,
American Standard, Moffatt, Scofield, Smith, Goodspeed trans-
latoil anid also the Short Bible) - PRAYER BOOKS and HYM-
NAIS, TESTA MEN TS, etc., etc.
At i xcel1ent Assortment of Easter Greeting Cards

FOUR DAYS
MAY 9-10-11-12,

1934

SIX

CONCERT LA RS
HILL AUDITORIUM

SECRETARY ICKES' love of flowers is so well
known that the bureau of parks, one of the
divisions of his interior department, supplies his
desk daily with fresh bouquets -usuall red roses.
As Others See It
THE PROFESOR AND
11E PUPIL
Why should relationships between the profes-1
sc0r and the student be formal outside of the class-
room? ''This is a question asked by many ob-
servers of University life. Why, say these indi-
viduals, should a professor constantly retain a
classroom relationship toward the members of
his class?
Many answers are possible. The chief one given
is that the professor must keep up a dignified
front to maintain student respect, and that he is
also apt to lose the respect of other faculty mem-
bers if he becomes too friendly with undergradul-
ates.
This answer would prove adequate if it were
not for the fact that some professors do maintain
a friendly relationship with students and are
usually considered the most popular professors on

Buck Garrett ............... Jack Holt
Kay Walling ................ Fay Wray
"Master of Men" tells of the rise of Buck Gar-
rett from the position of a "hunky" in a steel
mill to the presidency of the corporation, a la
Nick Carter. In this case, however, the hero gets
taken down a few pegs before the final close-up.
Buck leads his fellow workers in demanding bet-
ter working conditions. It seems ironic to this re-
viewer that the workers here are shown to be
perfectly satisfied with -an eight hour day and a
six day week. I do not quite follow Director
Lambert Hillyer's ideas about the aspirations and
desires of the worker of today. Intentionally or
not, labor is portraye dunsympathetically, the type
either being drunk or lazy.
This film will manage to hold the interest and
emotions of a certain type of movie goer, but it
will not appeal to the more intelligent who know
the worker and who also know Wall Street. Al-
though the story is simply constructed and at
times very unreal, the acting assignments are
quite adequately taken by Fay Wray, Walter Con-
nolly, and 'T'heodore Von Eltz. Miss Wray is ex-
ceedingly pretty and dreamy. Jack Holt is getting
fat and clumsy. He shouldn't attempt love roles
any more. On a horse he might get by, but in
the drawing room or office he is awkward and
misplaced.
-J. C. S.
So Gen. Johnson says he wants criticisms. This
dispels any idea that the General has been sub-
scribing to a clipping service.
For the collector of curiosities: The nation's
smallest postollice, a 10 by 20 structure, stands
at Large, Pennsylvania.j

PRELIMINARY ANNOUNCEMENT
Earl V. Moore, Musical Director Eric DeLomarter, Associate Conductor
Frederick Stock, Orchestra Condtctor Juvd l4igbee, Young People's Conductor
LUCREZIA BORi. ............. .................. Soprano
Metropolitan Opera Association
ROSAPONSELLE......................................Soprano
Metropolitan Opera Association
JEANETTE VREELAND....................... Soprano
American Concert and Oratorio Singer
COE GLADE...............................Contralto
Chicago Civic and other Operas

PAUL AILTHOUSE................ ... ....... .
Metropolitan Opera Association
ARTHUR HACKETT... . ............... ... .
American Opera and Concert Singer
THEODORE WEBB. ..........................
American -Oratorio Singer
CHASE BAROMEO ... .... . . .. . .. . . . .. . ...
Chicago, LoScalo, and South American Operas
GU ILA BUSTABO..........................
Young American Virtuoso

.. Tenor
.. Tenor
Baritone
Bass
Violinist

MSCHA LEVITI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Distinguished Russian Ployer
MA BEL ROSS RHEAD... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Choral Union Accompanist
PA L MER CHRISTIAN..................
University of Michigan Organist

.. Pianist
...Pianist
Organist

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Le.t's Give Tie Ki,
A Break .. .

P ERHAPS you have never wanted
to go to a summer camp, or per-
haps you have been able to get out on a lake

The University Choral Union 300 Voices The Stanley Chorus 40 Voices
Chicago Symphony Orchestra .70 players Ninth Symphony .- .-.-.-Beethoven
Young People's Festival Chorus 400 Voices The Seasons-- -----Haydn
An--..irr rp sr- t.. ta r:Anv arr %thPA ThoIm 1tl1 A,,-r:.Iirrsic

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