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October 07, 1933 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-10-07

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SATURDAY, OCT. 7, 1933

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

Nine Big

Ten

Teams

Play

Today;

One Conference Battle

Minnesota And '
Indiana. Meet
At Minneapolis
Wisconsin vs. Marquette
Will Be Feature Of 7
Non-Conference Games
Although nine Big Ten teams have
games tomorrow only two of the con-
tests will have any bearing on the
Conference championship. Indiana
will tangle with the Gophers from
Minnesota in a game at Minneapolis.
The other eight teams appear to
have comparatively easy games, out-
side of the Michigan-Michigan State
and Wisconsin-Marquette battles.
Ohio State plays Virginia University
at Columbus, Iowa takes on Braley
at Iowa City, Chicago plays Cornell
College (Ill.) while Illinois meets
Washington U. at St. Louis; and
the Boilermakers from Purdue take
on Ohio University at Lafayette.
Minnesota Favored
Minnesota is favored over Indiana,
particularly becauseof their strong
showing at the end of the 1932 sea-
son. Coach Bierman has in Captain
Roy Oen a center of All-American
calibre and a fine fullback in Pug
Lund, the Gophers stellar punter. The
line will be composed largely of soph-
omores who have plenty of weight
but little experience.
In Captain Englemyer, tackle, and
Lyons, giant negro end, Coach Hays'
has the nucleus of a fine line. Bob
Jones, who played fullback last year,
is working at guard this season. Vel-
ler, a veteran from last year, will be
calling signals for the Hoosiers. Wal-
ker, a sophomore, appears to be ably
filling the hole at full left by Jones.
Wisconsin Weak
Ineligibility and injuries have cut
heavily into the Wisconsin roster on
the eve of the battle with the Hill-
toppers from Marquette. Captain Hal
Smith, at fullback, will have a sup-
porting cast made up largely of soph-
omores. Paccetti ,a guard; Hayworth,
end; Koenig a center are the only
returning veterans.
Marquette, with Captain Art Kreu-
ger at center and veterans on both
sides of him, should have a strong
line, but the backfield will have to
depend largely on sophomoremate-
rial.
Fall Sports Begin
In I-M Competition
Building and pool hours for the
Intramural Sports Building were an-
nounced yesterday by Earl N. Riskey,
assistant director. The building, open
daily from 8 a. m. to 6:30 p. m. will
be closed nights and Sundays until
November 15, after that date being
open nights until 10 p. m. and Sun-
days to 5:30 p. m.
The pool is at' present open from
3 to 6 p. m. each afternoon, and fol-
lowing November 15 will be open
Sundays from 3 to 5:30 p. m., and on
Monday, Wednesday and Friday
nights from 7 to 9 p. m.
At present activities are under way
in five divisions, fraternity, indepen-
cient, all-campus, faculty, and cos-
mopolitan. The last is a competition
among foreign students which is be-
ing continued-after proving popular
last year. Fraternity speedball, inde-
pendent touch football, All-Campus
and faculty golf and tennis and cos-
mopolitan tennis competitions are al-
ready under way. Faculty men are
also registering for other tourna-
ments.
In the finals of the Orientation
period tennis tournament for fresh-
men, Jarvis Dean defeated Miller
Sherwood 6-3, 6-2,in play which
Coach Johnstone characterized as
"the best shown in frosh tennis for

several seasons. As a result of the
tournament and the match Dean will
play No. 1 on the frosh tennis team
and Sherwood No. 2.
Results of the freshman swimming
meet held in connection with Orien-
tation activities follow:
50 yd. free style-Won by Barnard,
(2) Dunlop, (3) Gillespie. Time, :25.1.
110 yd. free style-Won by Bar-
nard, (2) Kasely, (3) Person. Time,
:57.1.
50 yd. breast-Won by Kasely, (2)
Vandervelde, (3) Larson. Time, 32.6.
Diving-Won by Kuesel, (2) Upson,
(3) Wheeler.
Men Restricted In Use
Of Palmer Field Courts
No longer can, men play on the
Palmer Field tennis courts. Thus or-
dains the Women's Physical Educa-
tion department.
But the rule, which goes into ef-
fect Saturday, October 7, has an ex-
ception. Women students may invite
men friends to play on these courts
if they secure guest cards from the
matron in the Women's Athletic
Building. Those who desire such cards

Stellar Michigan Fullback

New York Wins
Over Senators;
Go 11 Inninos
Hubbell Increases Giant
Lead, Three Games ToI
One; Ryan Shares Glory
WASHINGTON, Oct. 6-VP)-The
young man who sounded the Giants' ,
famous war cry-"They Cannot Beat
Us"-proved it this afternoon in one
of the most thrillitg world series
games played in years.
John Collins (Blondy) Ryan, the
fair-haired boy shortstop of the Na-
tional League champions, came
through in the eleventh inning with
the base-hit that scored the winning.
run and then saved the game by
starting a double play that ended the
last desperate rally of the Senators
with the bases full.
In a finish that had the hearts of
one and all, including 27,762 cash
customers, beating wildly with ex-
citement and suspense, Carl Owen
Hubbell pulled out of his second
conquest of the American League
champions by the thin margin of 2
to 1 after a sensational duel with
Monte Weaver, youthful right-hand-
er of the Senators.
But for an error by the great Hub-
bell himself in the seventh inning,
when he juggled Joe Kuhel's easy
bunt and paved the way for the ty-
ing score, the master of the "screw
ball" would have scored a 1 to 0
shutout in the regulation nine inn-
ings, thanks to a terrific home run
drive by Manager Bill Terry into the
cone-like centerfield bleachers in the
fourth frame.
As a result of this deadlocked sit-
uation, the two pitchers and the two
teams fought in spectacular fashion
for the edge. Four times the Sena-
tors failed to score off Hubbell or
break through the Giants' defense,
with runners on third base, in a fur-
ious struggle marked by the ejection
of Heinie Manush, slugging leftfield-
'er, from the game after the sixth
inning, for a row with Umpire
Charles Moran of the National
League on a close decision at first
base.

Southern Grid
Powers Clash%
In TiltsToday,
Southern football fans today will
see most of the local high-powered
teams swing into action today as the
fight for the Southern Conference
title starts.
The Georgia-Tulane game at
Athens stands forth as'the most in-
teresting tilt of the day. Although
the Bulldogs lost five games last year,;
the team was mainly composed of
green material. This game, however,
will see a rugged line and a fast back-'
field, with all the necessary experi-
ence to represent Georgia. Tulane lost
most of. last year's stalwarts and
started this season by losing to the
tough Texas Aggies. Coach Ted Cox
will have a hard time getting his un-
experienced Green Wave ready to
wash down the Bulldog from Athens.
Tech Tackles Kentucky
Bill Alexander's Georgia Tech tor-
nado will take on its first Conference
opponent today when it faces Ken-
tucky U. at Lexington. The Go'lden
Tornado won last week's game with
Clemson and it will meet a heavy
line protecting that master triple-
threat, Ralph Kercheval and Coach
Harry Gamage promises that Tech
will find the going tough.
The North Carolina-Vanderbilt
ruckus will be another thriller with
the Commodores out to even up that
tie they were held to earlier in the
season by Oklahoma U.
Florida Faces Sewanee
Florida will face Sewanee in what
will probably determine the leading
contender for third division title of
the Southern Conference.
Alabama U. will face what is con-
sidered an early-season setup when it
meets Mississippi U at Birmingham
today. but although Mississippi has
seen bad times as respects to football
teams these last few years, it is still
a Southern Conference team, which
means that it is still hard to beat.
DEMAND the only FULL QUART
CAVALIER
PALE DRY GINGER ALE
and LIME RICKEY
32 OUNCE at 15c
O (Pus 5c Bottle Deposit)
SODAT YOUR FAVORITE STORE

Seven Major Football Games
'To Be Contested In East Today

Only seven major football gamesE
are scheduled for eastern fans today,
and four of them are merely re-,
hearsals for more important contestsf
in the future. The early season set-
ups for the majority of the larger
schools make the week-end quite un-
important in its bearing on standings
in the various sectional leagues.
The banner battle of the day will
pit Temple University against Car-
negie Tech., traditional foes and
evenly matched, according to all pre-
game dope. Glenn "Pop" Warner will,
send the team he coached to a win
over Southern Carolina last week
against the strongest outfit the Tech
boys have had in a decade. Pop is
using the same style of offense that
he used at Stanford, which is ex-
pected to give Tech plenty of head-
aches.
Columbia-Lehigh in Test Game
The Columbia-Lehigh game at
Baker Field, New York, is important
merely from the viewpoint of the
Lehigh fans, who are watching the
interest shown their school in a big
game. Since Col. Kellogg, late of the
Purdue athletic department, said that
Lehigh "will be taken out of big time
football temporarily," alumni of the
school are attempting to prove that

popular interest is against such a
move. The fight put up by Lehigh to-
day will determine whether 'this
group will oppose the move further.
Cornell Prepares For Michigan
Michigan fans should be interested
in the Cornell-Richmond encounter,
because of the backfield problem Cor-
nell is trying to settle before the
team comes to Ann Arbor next week.
"Gloomy Gil" Dobie, the Big Red
mentor, has been shifting his backs
around during this week but has not
yet found a satisfactory combination.
Under the direction of Capt. Bob
Lassiter, Yale will meet Maine in a
game preparatory to taking on Wash-
ington and Lee Oct. 14. Harvard
meets Bates in the first of a series
of easy games which includes New
Hampshire and Holy Cross. Princeton
is figured to stop Amherst today and
Williams next week, leading up to a
good game Oct. 21 with Columbia.
CANOES FOR RENT
SAUNDERS
Foot of Cedar Street
on Huron River

Ii -

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

for

AN OFFICIAL

RECORD

*. .*. '....... i.....':' - .
-Associated Press Photo
John Regeczi the _tellar junior who will probably start at fullback
for the Wolverines in this afternoon's game. Regeezi's kicking last
year was heralded as perhaps -le finest in the country, and was an
important ,cog in the 3 P's system so successfully employed by Mich-
igan; throughout the season. A capable passer, he will be relied upon
to accept a part of the passing, burden this year. He is also a fine
runner and is an able triple-threat man. He is a proverbial "bulwark
of defense" and with Chuck Bernard to help back up the line, renders
the tenter of the Wolverine line almost impregnable.

OF CAMPUS ACTIVITY

$4.25 MA I L ED

BOX SCORE
NEW YORK
ABRHTBOAE

I ~ r -- -- ---'--'----- - -'- '-

Moore, If .....
Critz, 2b .... .
Terry, lb ....
Ott, rf ......
Davis, m ....
Jackson, 3b ..
Mancuso, c
Ryan, ss ....
Hubbell, p ...

5
6
5
4
4
5
2
5
4

0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0

2
0
2
2
1
1
0
2
3

3
0
5
2
1
1
0
2
1

3
6
12
4
1
0
5
1
1

0
5
0
0
0
2
0
5
3

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1

Totals ......40 2 11 15 33 15 1
WASHINGTON

Myer, 2b
Goslin, rf-If
Manush, If . .
Harris, rf
Cronin, ss..
Schulte, m ...
Kuhel, lb ....
Sluege, 3b ...
Sewell, c .... .
Weaver, p ...
Russell, p ...
*Bolton .....
Totals.

AB R H
4 0S2
4 0 .1
2 0 0
..1 0 0
5 01
5 0 1
5 1 1
3 0 0
4 0 2
4 0 0
0 0 0
1 0 0

TB O
2 6
1 1
0 1
0 2
1 1
1 2
1 14
0 2
2 4
0 0
0 0
0 0

A
4
0
0
0
4
0
1
1
1
6
0
0

E
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

38 1 8 8 33 17 0

*Batted for Russell in eleventh.
New York......00010000001-2
Washington ...0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0-1
Runs batted in--Terry, Sewell, Ry-
an. Two base hit-Moore. Home
run-Terry. Sacrifices-Davis, Goslin,
Bluege 2, Hubbell, Mancuso. Double
lays-Myer and Kuhel; Ryan, Critz
and Terry. Left on bases-New York
12, Washington 11. Bases on balls-
Off Weaver 4 (Moore, Ott, Mancusi
2); Hubbell 4 (Manush, Myer, Har-
ris, Sewell). Struck out-By Weaver
3 (Jackson, Ryan, Davis); Russell 1
(Moore); Hubbell 5 (Kuhel 2, Wea-
ver 2, Cronin). Hits-Off Weaver
11 in 10 1-3 innings, Russell 0 in 2-3.
Losing pitcher-Weaver. Umpires-
Plate, Ormsby (AL); first base, Mo-
ran (NL); second base, Moriarty
(AL); third base, Pfirman (NL);
Time-2:59.
DANCE
with
GENE BURHANS
and His Orchestra

TOBACCO to grow, to ripen and
become mellow, has to take in or
absorb something,. .. not Vitamin D,
Of course, but something that it gets
from the right amount of Sunshine
It's the Southern sunshine you read about,
combined with the right sort of climate and
moisture, that makes the Carolinas, Georgia,
Kentucky, Maryland, and Virginia the best
tobacco country in the world.
You can stand down there in that South-
ern sunshine and almost see it grow.
This ripe, mellow tobacco is skillfully
cured by the farmer. Then, for 30 months,
it's aged-just like fine wine.
It takes the right quantity of each kind of
these tobaccos, blended and cross-blended
-then seasoned with Turkish, to make a
milder cigarette. Sunshine helps. Just try it!

lti

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