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October 04, 1933 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-10-04

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, OCT 4, 1 0''1

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 4, 1933

ception of small children, is always cordially wel-
come.
Today's program has been planned to meet the
desires of any audience. It contains music
chronologically interesting, including pre-classic,
romantic, and contemporary items. To the new-
comers the program will prove extremely musical
and perhaps novel because of the wide range of
literature covered. To those who have become re-
cital-conscious, the program embodies these ele-
ments, and invokes the welcome feeling of famil-
iarity with the approach of the performer to his
task, and emphasizes the spirit of good-taste that
always prevails at the recitals; all of which makes
them decidedly worth-while.
HENDERSON
PRESENTS GUY MAIER
As part of his plan to make the season at the
Cass musical as well as theatrical, Robert Hen-
derson announces two Saturday morning pro-
grams designed especially for' children, featuring
Lee Pattison and Guy Maier. Mr. Maier will pre-
sent his famous "Musical Journey" this Saturday,
and the men will give a joint two-piano recital a
week from then.
Mr. Maier's "Musical Journey" consists of slide
illustrations of trips he has made in Europe, ac-
companied by piano comments. It has won high
praise wherever it has been presented. The pro-
gram will be as follows:
PART I
1. Lullaby.............Shubert-Godowsky
2. The Erl-King .............Schubert-Liszt
3. The Stars'....................Schubert
4. "Die Fledermaus"
Waltzes ............ Strauss-Gruenfeld
5. Hark, Hark, the Lark.....Schubert-Liszt
6. Variations on "Ah, Vous Dirais-je
Maman". .....................Mozart
PART II
Wandering with Mozart and Schubert
through Austria and Bavaria. (Wasserburg,
Salzburg, Munich, the Salzkamergut, Ischl,
down the Danube, Viennt, etc. Illustrated
with Mr. Maier's original slides.)
Screen Reflections
AT THE WUERTH
"FORGOTTEN MEN"
This amazing picture of the Worl( War is the
first of its kind to be shown shwing the actual
picture of the fighting in the 1914-1918 period.
This sort of film is rather hard to judge as a reg-
ular feature, being of more historical significance
than anything else, because of no direction, char-
acters a'd plot and this making any fixed scale
forjudgment (stars) out of the question. But re-
gardless of the absence of the usualthings that
make up the average movie, #'Forgtten Men"
must be placed in line with the regular first class
pictures because of its remarkable photography of
the titanic undertaking involving the major na-
tions of the world.
If you have a weak heart, or something or other,
as the advertisement says, stay away. The hor-
rors of the War are brought out with no hesita-
tion and scenes of slaughter, gore, and suffering
are shown with the purpose of bringing home the
fact that war does not pay. Maybe if the Con-
gress of the United States were included in the
first draft and were shown this picture they would
think twice before getting into another war. The
picture serves, in an admirable cause, notice to the
public that it is really blind madness to go
through with such a gigantic movement causing,
the slaughter of men and destruction of property.-
If you want to see the War as it really was see
this picture to-day, as it is the last showing.
The title, "Forgotten Men", is chosen to ad-
vance the Bonus Army cause now in the political
limelight of America and scenes of the burning of
their camp in Washington are shown to help the
cause of the men who fought for their' country.
'however, the applause accorded President Roose-
velt in Chicago Monday is indication enough that
the Bonus plea is not a valid one. But the pic-
tures of the War overshadow this point so greatly
that it does not detract from the film.
R. E. L.
BY HUBBARD hEAVY
Hollywood -(P) "I've always played sexy roles.

"My voice always has been low and what they
call 'fetching.'
"I've always put my hands on my hips and
rolled my eyes.
"And that's what I'm still doing.
"Moreover, Mae West is my favorite actress."
This was Clara Bow's answer when I told her,
merely for the fun of seeing how she'd react, that
I'd heard someone say she was imitating Mae.
West. At the moment, Clara is playing the tough
little sideshow dancer in a new version of "The
Barker," renamed "Hoopla."
'A GREAT TEAM'
"I think Mae West is simply swell. I'd like to
play in a picture with her; but I don't suppose
that's possible. I think we'd make a great team,
with me playing her sister or something like that.
But honestly, I don't think I'm imitating her.,
We each have our own style and while there may
be some similarity, each of us is' quite different."
Clara who has been in virtual retirement - it is,
a year since she made "Call Her Savage - looks
as fresh and bright and sparkling as she did four
or five years ago.
Her hair, frizzled all over her head in tiny ring-
lets for this role, is a few shades of red lighter.
than it used to be. Life- on the Bow-Bell ranch,
where she shoots and rides and does much of her
own cooking - all of which, to her dismay, adds,
pound after pound - apparently agrees with her.
So much so that she is planning to go back
there.
"I haven't any other picture plans now," she
said.
"Sometimes I think I'll retire, but I know that

VEC

._ . _ -. -. _ _ _ _ i

THE
SPOTLIGHT

By LARRY KING
NOT LONG ago a freshman girl got into a cab
bound for a rushing date at the Alpha Delta
Pi house, said collegiately to the driver, "Alpha
Delt house, please." Which is where she went.
Another group bound for the Alpha Omicrom Pi
house, recently moved to a new location between
the D.U. and Alpha Sig houses, walked into the
D.U. house by mistake. They had their mistake
courteously pointed out by 27 interested brothers
of the Delta Upsilon club.
"Three for bridge," called Jerry Hynes,
Theta Delt would-be wrestler, and got plenty
of volunteers. Bridger Hynes turned around,
found he had one too many volunteers, looked
disgusted, called "Three for bridge."
A SMALL DOG found his way into Prof. Arthur
Wood's class in criminology. Said Professor
Wood, "That dog took this course last year. Will
someone please put him out?" Sherwood Messner,
president of the S.C.A., seeing an opportunity to
do his good turn, volunteered, tried to coax the
dog across the room. The dog, amused, barked
encouragingly at the antics of the funny man, but
budged not. S.C.A. Messner grabbed the no longer
amused dog by the nape of the neck, walked to
the door with him, paternally patting his (the
dog's) head, put the dog down to open the door.
The dog, beginning to enjoy the game, scampered
back and Hero Messner had it to do all over again.
* * * *
A freshman called a woman's dormitory,
wanted a date with the best looking girl in
the building. The operator, a lady with a
sense of humor, connected him with the
house-mother. Another freshman wanted the
girl in either 446 or 664 but couldn't remem-
ber her name. After determining that he
wanted Miss 664, he asked about the name
and possibilities of 446. We are thinking of
assigning Cupid to the switchboards in the1
dormitories. ,I
FROM THE Daily Official Bulletin, "Electrical
Engineering 7a: Will meet hereafter on Wed-
nesday mornings at 8 o'clock, since this seems to
fit the programs of those who elected the course
better than the previously announced hour. How-'
ever, in order that those who need to do so may
rearrange their outside work, we shall meet once
more on 'Saturday at 8, October 7." Which means,
fellows, that you will have to postpone your "out-
side" work" until next Friday night.
A Washington
BYSTANDER
By KIRKE SIMPSON
WASHINGTON, Oct. 3 -- The October term of
the supreme court opens with prospects that
the justices will be called upon to make history.
A test of the fundamental theory of he whole
Roosevelt recovery program - that the constitu-
tion is broad and flexible enough to meet any na-
tional emergency --is virtually certain to come up
during that term. The future of constitutional
democracy may rest in the hands of Chief Justice
Hughes and his colleagues.
In view of that, this indication that no early
changes are expected in the personnel of the court
due to retirements is important. That is the word
drifting about Washington with four associate jus-
tices - Brandeis, Van Devanter, McReynolds and
Sutherland -now eligible for retirement on full
pay for life. Heretofore there have been frequent
rumors that at least three of the four might take
early advantage of their status.
JUSTICE SUTHERLAND came under the eligibl-
ity for retirement provisions only recently.
His health long has been poor. When the court
recessed it seemed possible he would be forced
soon to seek retirement. He has returned from a I
pilgrimage to his old home in Scotland and visits
to various European spas, however, in better
physical shape than he has known in a long time.
The retirement question has been indefinitely
deferred for him, his friends say.

LITTLE TO GO BY
THE probable weighing of constitutional techni-
calities of the Roosevelt new court membership
attaches special significance'to what it already has
done. The only glimpse the court yet has given as
to how it might react to the assumption by con-
gress and state legislatures of virtually extra-
constitutionalapowers tomeet a great economic
emergency was in the so-called Appalachian coal
case. That was an appeal to anti-trust laws to
outlaw a sales agreement.
The high court overturned the finding of a three
judge federal court which had sustained the at-
tack on the agreement. It took a lenient view as
to anti-trust act inhibitions.
Eight of the nine justices concurred in that
opinion. Only Justice McReynolds stoof aloof. He
did not submit any dissenting view.
POLITICS PREFERRED
WHITE HOUSE news writers who went north
with President Roosevelt on his brief Septem-
ber-October holiday heard with regret that he
was staying out of New York mayoralty fight.
They had hoped for a change in the steady diet
of economics they have had for months, even years.
"It was about all economics, depression econ-
omics, during the Hiover years," one veteran of

Union's First
Tournaments
Begin Monday
(Continued from Page 1)
meet. They added that" failure to
play any matches in either this or
the bridge tournament will result in
forfeiting the match. Participation
in these two all-campus events lastj
year was so general that plans are!
being made to accommodate a record
number of entrants.
Other recreational tournaments
scheduled include one in billiards and
a tentative plan for a swimming meet.
The former will follow the comple-
tion of the first two events, the bridge
and ping pong tournaments, while it
has yet to be determined when the
swimming meet will be run off.
Gargoyle To Run Col'm .j
About Campus Athletics
The new Gargoyle will show the
interest it takes in campus athletes
and athletics by running a column
dealing with the stars of the grid-
iron, track, and golf links, Thomas
E. Powers, '34, said yesterday.
In the first issue the column will
feature photographs of outstanding
plays and players, not only of Mich-
igan, bu t of opponents as Well. A
new and unusual. head, done in
photography will introduce the
column.
Besides the space developed to
football, there will be a feature ar-
ticle, replete with pictures about an?
outstanding Michigan athlete. The
first of these columns will tell about
Johnny Fischer, Michigan golfer who
recently competed in the National
Amateur Championship. The No-
vember issue will tell about someone
of equal renown on antl about the
campus.
BRITISH WIN AUTO MARKET
COLOMBO-The number of Brit-
ish cars in Ceylon has at last topped
those made in America. Figures up
to July 31 list 9,520 machines from
Great Britain against 9,510 from the
United States. A few years ago Amer-
ican cars were in the majority by;
thousands.

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING,
Pace clert.iseenwts with Classified
Advertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
Ti lasspiied columns close at Rye
!o' i c rintou cl ay of inse~tioni.
ox Cnu rs may be secured at no
Ciu i hi meavace li cper reading line
on basis of five average words to
lnle) r one otwo insertions.
i4e re ading, lin~e forthree or more
inlsertions.
ro l; C o 'i; PsrPote d ys
Minimum r e lines per insertion.
'telephone rate -15e per reading line
for one or two insertions.
14c per reading line for three or mnore
insertions.
10% discount if paid within ten days=
from the date' of last insertion.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
By contract, per line--2 lines daily, one
month................ .c
4 lines E. 0. D., 2 rnonths........... 3c
2 lines daily, college year.........7c
4 lines E. 0. D., college year.......7c
100 lines used as. desired.........9c
300 lines used as desired.........8c
1.000 lines used as desired.........7c
2,000 lines used as desired.........6c
The above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per inch.
Ionic type, upper and lower case. Add
6c per line to above rates for all capitil
letters. Add 6c per, line to above for
bold face, upper and lower case. Add
10c per line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 7% point
%'pe.
TAXICABS
ARCADE CAB. Dial 6116. Large com-
fortable cabs. Standard rates.
2x
FOR RENT
ROOMS: Graduate students, large,
attractive single or double rooms.
Phone 22832. 1111 Michigan.
66
ROOM for upper classman. No other
roomers. No. 13 Cutting Apart-
ments. Opposite Hutchine Hall.;
67
2 LARGE front rooms for men.
Shower. Double or single. Close to
campus. Priced reasonably. Ga-'
rage. 425 S. Division. 22352 68
ROULETTE BAN LIFTED
PARIS - France's 95-year ban
against roulette has been lifted in
the hope its whirring wheels will spin
some money into the country's yawn-
ing coffers.

LAUNDRY
WE,'DO your laundry work for one-
half the usual price. Phone 2-3739.
11
STUDENT and Family Laundry.
Good soft water. Will call for and
deliver. Telephone 4863. 3x
LAUNDRY wanted. .,Silks, wools
guaranteed. Quick service. Call for
and deliver. 611 E. Hoover. Phone
5594. 32
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Box darned.
Careful work at low price. 4x
HOME hand laundry. Special. shirts
beautifully finished, 13c. Phone
8894. 7x
BOARD
BOARD for Jewish students. Deli-
cious home cooking. Special chick-
en dinner, 50c. 611 E. Hoover. Ph.
2-3478. 31
PIANO TUNING
PIANO TUNING. The Concert Art-
ist Tuner. Phone 6776. Victor All-
mendinger. Office at residence. Ex-
clusive tuner for University School
of Music. 8
- HELP WANTED
WANTEE: 5 students, part 'time
'work. Apply 609 Packard. White
Swan Laundry. 76
NOTICE
PRE SCHOOL kindergarten for chil-
dren "3 to 5 years has reopened for
fall term.. Call Miss MacNaugh-
ton at 5837. 73
INSTRUCTION in Mathemathics
and Mechanics offered by teacher.
Very reasonable. Phone 6239. 71
TAXI-Phone 9000. Seven-passenger
cars. Only standard rates. lx
WANTED
WANTED TO BUY MEN'S OLD AND
new suits and overcoats. Will pay
3, 4, 5, and 8, 9;dollars: Phone Ann
ligr 4Q6 ",h o Buer.5x

I C'LASSIFIED DIRECTORY

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CHOlA

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wa rrair

REDUCED PRICES
Prices of Season Tickets (10 Concerts) have been re-
duced to $5.00 - $7.90 - $8.50 - $10,00. In addition,
each season ticket contains a $3.00 May Festival coupon.

N

BOSTON

SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, COnduCtor
ayers Tuesday, October 24

110 PI

FRITZ KREISLER, Violinist
King of Violinists.

Thursday, November 9

VIENNA BOY

S C HOIR
GEORGE GRUBER, COndiC for
?8 Wednesday, November 22

Fournded 149

CINCINNATI SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
EUGENE GOOSSENS, Conductor
Goossens' Ann Arbor Debut Tuesday, December 5
MARIA OLSZ EWSKA, Contralto
Metropolitan Star Thursday, December 14
SERGEl RACHMAN I NOFF, Pianist
The Master Thursday, January 18
LILY PONS, Soprano
French Opera Star Monday, January 29
POLDI MILDNER, Pianist
Piano Cycone Thursday, February 15

a

4

DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Ossip GABRILOWITSCH, Director

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