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October 01, 1933 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Heavy Guard
Placed After
Jail Outbreak
Wild Disorder Reigns In
Eastern Penitentiary; Is
Second Riot Of Week
PHILADELPHIA, Sept. 30.-P)--
Rebellion seethed behind steel bars
in crowded, century-old Eastern Pen-
itentiary today while reinforced de-
tails of state and city police pa-
trolled its confines as a result of the
prison's second serious outbreak
within a week.
Clamoring convicts, many of them
"lifers," threw the grim old institu-
tion into wild disorder Friday night
after helmeted state troopers quelled
rioters 'who started a free-for-all in
the yards during Friday's late recrea-
tion period.
Locked in their cells, the mal-con-
tents set up a din that was heard
outside the high stone walls and
brought throngs of curious to the
scene.
The situation, although apparent-
ly under control, was so serious that
Warden Herbert J. Smith summoned
additional state troopers and city
police to the prison and asked Na-
tional Guard headquarters in Phil-
adelphia for a list of riot equipment
[available.
Rioting, the most serious in the old
prison's history, broke out Tuesday
night. The convicts started more
than a score of fires by igniting their
mattresses and clothing. They
smashed cell furniture, hurled flam-
ing material, into the corridors, and
made the place a bedlam for hours.
Warden Smith was clubbed over the
head by one prisoner in attempting
to quell the disorder.
Friday night fire did not seriously
menace the place because mattresses
and other inflammables had been
taken from the worst offenders and
few of them had matches.
With telephonic communication to
the prison refused, officials did not
disclose complete details of the lat-
est outbreak. However, Warden
Smith said the rioting and hunger
striking "can be traced to the vicious
and degenerate element."
CANOES FOR RENT
SAUNDERS
Foot of Cedar Street
on Huron River

Hazing Of Professor In '80's
Pictured In Letter To Regent

An interesting commentary on un-
iversity life in Ann Arbor in the
"Naughty '80's" is gleaned from the
columns of an old issue of the
Chronicle, literary book formerly
published fortnigltly by the stu-
dents, which has been sent to Regent
Junius E. Beal by Judge Thornton
W. Sargent, '82, of Wichita, Kan.
This particular number of the pe-
riodical carries a detaled account of
riodical carries a detailed account of
teenth Century colloquialism mean-
ing hazing) of one Prof. Wooster W.
Beman and the suspension of the
culprits, Harry G. Sherrard and Ed-
ward H. Bull. Judge Sargent's letter
to Regent. Beal tells this story of the
case.
"On the campus that Saturday
afternoon the word was passed
around that we should meet and
then go and horn Beman. I prom-
ised to go. Baker and Bull roomed
together and both of them promised
to go, but when the night came
'Sherry' and I were so tired from
playing football that we went to bed
rather early and, after we were
sleeping soundly, someone, who was
a member of our class but whose
name I cannot recall at present, but
who lived in Cleveland, Ohio, climbed
up the cherry tree and entered our
room, woke us up and said, "Come
on, we are going to horn Beman."
Sherry got up and went but I was
so sleepy that I didn't get up, which
was lucky for me. They then went
two houses away from where we were
rooming and called Baker and Bull.
Like me, Baker was too sleepy to
go but Bull wasn't and, consequently,

he went. As stated in the Chronicle
article, they left the lights burning
in their rooms, the police saw the
lights burning and waited for the
boys to return and, just as 'Sherry'
was ready to enter the yard where
we were rooming, the police stepped
from behind a tree, arrested both
of them, and took them to jail.
"The next morning, which was
Sunday morning, Baker and I missed
them and we wondered where they
were. We never thought of theirj
being arrested, but supposed they
had gone to the rooms of some of
the other boys and were spending
Sunday with them - probably only
half clothed, but as they did not re-
turn, Baker and I went to the jail
and there we found them, much to
our surprise. The next morning they
were fined, we paid their fine and
they went to their classes, but soon
the faculty discovered who they were
and they were suspended."
CHINESE CHAPTER MOVES
The A 1 p h a chapter of Alpha
Lambda, international Chinese stu-
dent fraternity, announced yester-
day that it has moved its chapter
headquarters from 1402 Hill St. to
1346 Geddes Ave.
Prof. Max Aleburg, until Hitler
came into power a leading member
of the Berlin bar and once highly
popular in German liter'ary circles,
a member of the faculty of the Berlin
committed suicide this month in
Switzerland.

Alumni Luncheon Is
Set For October 6
Alumni of the University of Mich-
igan and Michigan State College will
congregate next Friday noon, Octo-
ber 6, the day before the traditional
football game between the two insti-
tutions, at the Hotel Statler, Detroit,
for their annual luncheon.
According to plans released here
by T. Hawley Tapping, general sec-
retary of the alumni association,
Milo Crawford, a prominent Mich-
igan alumnus, will serve as the
toastmaster for the occasion. Ath-
letic Directors Fielding H. Yost and
Ralph H. Young, as well as Coaches
Harry Kipke and Dick Bachmann,
successor to Jim Crowley at East
Lansing, have already promised to
speak on the program.
Still-Operator Fined In
Circuit Court Yesterday
Guilty of possessing liquor and op-
erating a still, Martin Beer was fined
$50 and costs and put on five years
probation yesterday in Circuit Court
by Judge George W. Sample.
Beer was arrested early in August
on a speeding charge. Officers found
a large quantity of liquor in his car
and two stills were discovered at his
residence. Beer has served 30 days
in the County Jail on the speeding
charge.
Fraternities and Sororities
For Artistic
PIANO TUNING
Call the
Kempf Music Studios
Prompt Service
Phone 6328 312"S. Division

-Associated Press Photo
As Cuba was stirred by rumors of plans for a new revolt, Col.
Fulgencio Batista (left) increased his armed forces. The Cuban military
leader is shown here with Col. Juan Blas Hernandez (center), veteran
revolutionary leader against former President Machado, and President

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