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January 28, 1934 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-01-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

r

THE MICHIGA

DAILY

League To Aid
hn Presenting
IseveIt Ball
Over 650 Tickets Are Sold
For Ann Arbor's Part Of
ld d )at ion ,
In order to accommodate the num-
bers who have signified their desire
to participate in the local Roosevelt
Birthday Ball, the League ballroom
as well as the Masonic Temple will
be used for the party Tuesday night.
Over 650 tickets have been sold al-
ready, according to W. F. Angell, sec-
retary of the arrangements commit-
tee.
The enormous birthday cake, 40
inches square, 40 inches high, and
weighing between 200 and 300
pounds, will be on display tomorrow
in a store on North Main between
Huron and Washington, and next
door to Preketes'. It will be lighted by
52 candles, numbering the years of
the President's life. Tuesday night it
will be taken to University Hospital
and distributed among the children
patients there.
Governor William A. Comstock is
to speak to the Masonic Temple
party before he proceeds to the ball
in Detroit Tuesday night. One of the
main features of the program at the
local ball will be a radio amplifica-
tion at 11:15 permitting the party
to hear the nation-wide broadcast of
music and entertainment in honor of
Roosevelt. Marie Dressler, Eddie Can-
tor and many other celebrities, as
well as a number of famous dance
orchestras, will be featured over the
network. There will also be a 15-min-
ute talk by the President.
The Gail-Corbetfl Orchestra will
play at the Temple. The clubrooms
will also be opened to guests who
wish to play cards or pool. Tickets
may be secured at Calkins-Fletcher's
State street drug store, at Crippen's
Drug Store on Main, and from police-
men and firemen.
Teachers Promised Aid
By Relief Commission
(By Intercollegiate Pressli
CHI C A G O, Jan. 27. - Chicago
school teachers who have been taking
tremendous discounts on tax war-
rants they. receive in lieu of cash,
have been promised by the Illinois
Emergency Relief Commission that
they can exchange the warrants with
that organization at no discount for
food, fuel, and clothing.
o v
Choose The Style That
Shits You Best .,. .
=And the Modern Beauty Shop will
do the rest. Croquignole, Oil Push
Complete...............$ .
Monday and Tuesday-
Shampoo and Finger Wave....
0 Wednesday, Thursday, 35
Friday and Saturday.......... '
MODERN BEAUTY SHOP
Phone 2-1478 113 South Main
omono oso<-oe~0

Half-And-Half Hose

Miss Nora Crane Hmnt Relates
Story Of Early Musical Career;

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the eighth
in a series of articles on prominent
women in the University.
By ELEANOR BLUM
Approximately twenty-five years
ago, Miss Nora Crane Hunt assumed
charge of the University Girls Glee
Club. "The Glee Club then was just
about a double quartet," Miss Hunt
says. Since then the club has become
under her direction, one of the finest
in the country.
Miss Hunt was born in Jackson,
Mich., and received her early educa-
tion there; coming to Michigan in
her freshman year of college to en-
roll in the School of Music. Miss
Hunt comes by her musical talent na-
turally having come from a very mu-
sical family. She first discovered her
ability, however, in try-outs for a
high school glee club. As she ex-
pressed, "I kept going up, up, and
then down, down, low." It was then
that she decided that she would strive
for a musical career.
At the time that Miss Hunt en-
rolled in the University, her aunt,
Miss Harriett Hunt, was on the fac-
ulty; for this reason she chose Mich-
igan. While in school she helped to
found the Alpha group of the musical
sorority, Sigma Alpha Iota, which
since that time has spread all over
the United States.
Taughit In Jackson
After graduation she busied her-
self with "all activities of a young
singer," teaching vocal lessons in
Jackson, giving recitals, participat-
ing in operas and doing church sing-
ing.
Since that time she has done con-
siderable graduate work in music. In
1927, she toured Europe, and studied
with Dr. Augustus Milner of London.
In the summers of 1930 and 1932
she did vocal work with Dudley Buck
in N. Y. and furthered her study of
choral conducting at Columbia.
Eneouraged By Mrs. Jordan
Her work with the Glee Club was
encouraged by Myra Jordan, then
Dean of Women, who was very much
interested in a good organization for
women singers. "It was something of

a job getting people to listen to usI
in those days," she said. "We werel
only too glad to sing at the Barbour
gym whenever they gave one of their
teas." In those days we weren't sing-
I ing Rachmaninoff and Dickinson
either; that takes training, and a
gradual development of taste. Now
the women who sing it, not only are
able to sing well, but enjoy doing the
difficult pieces.
In 1929, under Miss Hunt's direc-
tionf the Girls Glee Club was chosen
to sing over a national radio hook-
up. It was with regret that the Glee
Club heard that their director was
to resign last year. She still main-
tains her active interest in it, how-
"Round the Campus"
FASH IONS
that start the day at
sun-up and end in the
wee sma' hours . .
Tricky Little Suits
Gay New Prints-
Lovely Pastels-
S Double-Duty Cocktail
Frocks-
Sophisticated
Formals
at prices that are kind
to your budget. Drop in K
and let us show them
to you.
The
ELIZABETH DILLON
GOWN SHOP
605 East William Street 9

Modder Has Article Chaperone Entertained
In Sewanee Review At Sorority Bridge Tea
Mrs. Mary Tuller. chaperone of
M. F. Modder of the English de- Zeta Tau Apha sorority was enter-
partment is the author of an article tained at a bridge tea Friday evening.
entitled "Crinolines and Whiskers," The occasion was the celebration of
appearing in the latest number of Mrs. Fuller's birthday.
the Sewanee Review. Among those present were Mrs. E.
Mr. Modder's article is described by D. Dillinghan, Mrs. Maude Thomp-
the editors as "a delightful comment son, Mrs. Blanch Harley, Mrs. Mandy
on the Victorians as seen by the y Mrs. Florence Reynolds, Mrs.
Frank Ohingei, Mrs. Myrtle Moore,
essayist through the caricatures of _rank g s,
Victorian society made by George Du
Maurier." W.A.A.
BOER LEADER DEAD I E A H R

tj
f
f
.i

and Mrs. Eva Anderson. Mrs. Harley
received the door prize: Mrs. Reyer
the consolation.
Wolal 'WlioWo hIeard
Linoh Debate Dies
ATLANTA, Jan. 27.-P)- Mrs.
Olive A. Clondening, 94 years old,
who listened at 19 as Abraham Lin-
coln and Stephen A. Douglas debated
at Freeport, Ill., in August, 1858. is
dead at the home of a son here.

NEW YORK, Jan. 27. --UP)- 001.
Manuel de Hora, 85 years oid. con-
sulting engineer and soldier of for-
tune who surrendered Johannesburg
to Lord Roberts in the Boer war, is
dead here.

U

i

.

Lest YuForge

-Associated Press Photo
Billee Seward, a Philadelphia girl
in the films, introduced a new fad to
Hollywood when she appeared in hose
half black and half white.

Union dances will continue thru
*each week-end of the examination
period, with music by the Union Band.
2 Groups desiring private dining
rooms for J-Hop breakfasts may
obtain them by making reservations at
the Union desk.

I

OVER THE
WEEK-END

The new soft lighting at the League
seemed to effectively dispel the gloom
of examination time, but for all of
that the crowds were considerably
thinned because of it.
Fashion notes on spring don't scare
the women into wearing lighter
shades; black and the reds are still
favorites for January weather. Miss
Peggy Hadden's dress of American
beauty was simply cut on bias lines,
and ornamented solely with a black
velvet bow at the neck.
Mary Kunkle, '36, wore a Sunday
night dress of heavy black velvet; a
stiff collar gave the dress an Eliza-
bethan effect. An attractive eel gray
dress was worn by Mary Ldu Tray-
wick, '37; a bodice trimmed in little
metallic crosses was an interesting
note.
A green checked bow and sleeve in-
sets of the same checked material
were the finishing touches on a black
crepe dress worn by Mabel Howard,
'37. Marie Heid, '35, was stunning in
a dress of gold metallic trim.

30.

The Union will sponsor a dance
on the night of February 9th for

those who have been unable to secure
J-Hop tickets.

4 ,

A Tea Dance will be given Satur-
day afternoon, February 9th, for

'
! . +n

ONLY ELEVEN MORE
HAIRDRESSI NG DAYS
BEFORE THE J-HOP.!
Get Your Hop Hairdressing Done Early
-a t -
BLUEBIRD HAIR SHOP
5 Nickels Arcade Phone 9616

those who are in town over J-Hop week-
end.

T

INE MICHIGAN UNION

J

.1

vmav
4

homanow"
mffiuw

Windows
Negro

Decorated With
Spiritual Motifs

(By Intercollegiate Press)
DETROIT, Jan. 27. -The Biblical
characters of Green Pastures, the
play based on Roark Bradford's
book, Old Man Adam an' His Chil-
lun, make up the figures in three
large new stained glass windows re-
cently dedicated in the chap/l at
Tuskegee Institute. They were the
first stained glass windows ever de-
signed with Negro spirituals as the
motif.

"T E

GIRL

IN THE

VELVET,

WA

SMART - LOVELY,

AH ! CHIC,

SArcade jewelry Shop

THE

IN F

DRESS,

SWANK-CLEVER- IN

FACT,

NEAT

I'

College
SFraternity
Jewelry

&ngraz'in g

High-Grade
Watch & Jewelry
Repairing

KMP

I

HAS BEEN

PLAY IING,

NOW

DISPLAY of FORMAL JEWELRY for the J-HOP

CARL F. BAY

16 Nickels Arcade

w..' f s

cI

BUSSE'S BEGUN,
SWISS DID THE CLEANING

1'l
, 1 w. ,/" f,
r 'a
..
r ', .r
%%%
f
- z''- Y
/-_ :
l
.

EVENING
GOWNS
* We are supplying glamour to
all the smart crowd by means of
Sequins, Rhinestones, Tulle and
Gay Colors. Put yourself in our
hands ... and you'll sure enough
ring the bell this year-

OH GOLLY! WHAT FUN!"

$17-95 and $14.75

11

1i

Ii ii U U

11

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