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January 14, 1934 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-01-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY,

Navy Planes on Start Of" Record lion olulu Flight

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Jud(iciary Post
On Council To
ie Filled Soon
A vacancy among the non-faculty
alumni members of the Interfrater-
nity Council Judiciary Committee
must be filled by the council at the
next meeting, which is to be held at
3 p. m. Wednesday at the Union.
The resignation of Herman Kleene,
'03, representative of Alpha Delta
Phi, who is leaving Ann Arbor, makes
the appointment of a successor nec-
essary. Houses interested in being
represented have been urged by Max-
well T. Gail, '34, council secretary-
treasurer, to make application in
writing for one of their alumni be-
fore the council meets on Wednes-
day.
Five possible candidates will be se-
lected at Wednesday's meeting by
the delegates, and the vacancy will be
filled from one of these men by Dean
of Students Joseph A. Bursley in ac-
cordance with the council constitu-
tion.
The Judiciary Committee is com-
posed of three faculty, three non-fac-
ulty alumni, and five students, and,
according to Gail, is "the governing
body of the Interfraternity Council,
passing on violations of the rushing
regulations and other of the council
rules."
Alfred B. Connable, Jr., '24, Delta
Kappa Epsilon, and Charles W. Gra-
ham, Psi Upsilon, are the present
alumni members of the committee.
CHACO WARFARE RESUMED
LA PAZ, Bolivia, Jan. 12- (P) -
A communique issued by the Bolivian
government today confirmed progress
of renewed warfare with Paraguay
in the Chaco boreal. The commun-
ique claimed Bolivians had repulsed
Paraguayan attacks in the west Pla-
tinillos region.

Reichbishop Defied

-Associated Press Photo
navy seaplanes began their 2,400-mile hop from San
ships skimming along the water in San Francisco Bay
10 P-3, one of the planes, attempting to lift its heavy load

YESTERDAY

-Associated Press Photo
This is Reichbishop Ludwig Muel-
ler, whose imposition of a dictator-
ship over the Evangelical church is
Germany was met with open defiance
by many pastors.
Eating Up Alimony
Ruled Out By Court
CHICAGO -(') - Alimony is not
to be eaten and Frank Cichow faces
a contempt order if he tries again.
This was the ruling of Superior
Judge Rudolph F. Desort, who or-
dered under threat of a jail sen-
tence, that Cichow cease his attempts
to eat up the alimony of his di-
vorced wife, Elizabeth.
She complained that Frank ap-
peared at her home at dinner time
each Sunday to make weekly ali-
mony payments of $10 and then in-
sisted on dining with her, attempting
to eat up $10 worth of food.

CHICAGO -Dr.-Alice Wynuekoop'5
"confession" will be aired thoroughly
as the first major development in her
trial for the murder of her daughter-
in-law, Rheta, it was indicated.
* * *
VIENNA - Government 1 e a d e r s
moved to oust Nazi sympathizer
from posts in the Civil Service and
in the Fascist Heimwehr, or Home
auard. The position of "commissar
of personnel" was created. The corn-
nissar's duty will be to purge the
;overnment of Naziism.
PARIS - The government of Ca-
nille Chautemps appeared to be tot-
ering after the demonstrations and
nrest aroused by the investigation
f the Bayonne pawnshop bond
;candal. However, M. Chautemps
vas able to wrest from the Chamber
of Deputies two smashing votes of
confidence.
* * *
LANSING - Pressure will probably
be brought to bear upon Gov. William
A. Comstock to cut his ambitious
program which he plans to submit
to a second special session of the
State legislature.
WASHINGTON-Joseph I.
Choate, Jr., Federal Alcohol Control
Administration chief, said that label-
ling of whiskey blends is "becoming
a more difficult program every day."
He made this statement when ask-
ing newspapermen to refrain from
prejudicing the public against all
blended liquor, saying "some blends
are good and some are not."
* * 4
WASHINGTON--The United
States Chamber of Commerce, in its
"fortnightly review of national busi-
ness affairs," said it was concerned
not so much with the Administra-
tion's plan to raise 10 billion dollars
in the next six months but rather in
the spending of the sum.

University's Handling Of Power

son Company. However, no profit
is made, for in summer when the
plant is running at a slow speed it
is necessary to purchase electricity.
Another of the interesting features
of the plant is the process of soft-
ening water so that it may be used
in the boilers without danger of cor-
roding the pipes and tanks. Every
day an average of 42,000 gallons of
water is evaporated. This is about
15,622,000 gallons per year. All of
this water must be softened and in
order to accomplish this approxi-
mately 510 tons of lime and sodiac
are used yearly.
Few students are aware of the ex-
tent of the system which has been
installed to insure their comfort. It
is4 a system composed of a huge
power house, a vast network of over
two miles of heating tunnel, a pur-
chasing department to supply essen-
tials, aid a group of 21 men who
winter 'and summer keep the home
fires burning.

Says President
Is Inclined To
Avoid Inflation
Farley, Speaking Before
Automotive Conference,
Upholds Roosevelt
CLEVELAND, Jan. 13. - (N) -
Postmaster General James A. Farleya
predicted today that President Roose-
velt would not "spread his sails be-
fore the inflation gale, with all the
perils that beset such a course."
The Democratic national chairman
asserted in a speech at the annual
Cleveland automotive luncheon that
neither would the President "sacrifice
the advances which have occurred in
commodity prices by taking the views
of the international bankers."
"For my own part," Farley con-
tinued, "I do not pretend to be an
authority on the subject.
"I know the President is such an
authority.
"I know he has plumbed the depths
of all the arguments. I know that his
policy comes from a ripened judg-
ment and I do not think that any of
us need fear that where he has been
right so often he is likely to go wrong
in this particular field."
Farley praised Congress for its co-
operation with the President in last
year's special session and expressed
confidence that the present session
would be as helpful.
He prophesied defeat in the next
elections of "crusted old guardsmen
and standpatters - men who still
talk and think in archaic and worn
out terms and can do nothing but
quibble and grumble in dull partisan-
ship and creak their ancient party
opposition to whatever is being of-
fered."
"The people, because of their faith
in Roosevelt," he concluded, "bore
the inconvenience and discomfort
which resulted with patience and
good temper, and the results show
that their faith was not misplaced.
"It is my earnest belief that under
his leadership we shall in good time
come to a full realization of the hopes
and ambitions of all good Americans
for a restoration of our country's
prosperity and for the greater hap-
piness of all our people."

I

ilwXary Receives Incunabula For
Stephen M. Spa ulding Collection

Some thing
New!

Character Education In Soviet
Russia," a book edited by Professor
William Clark Trow of the School
of Education appeared for original
review on Jan. 9.
The book is a discussion of the
activity and methods of the Soviet
government in the education and or-
ganization of the children into what
is known as the Pioneers. The book,
which consists of a series of essays
used in educating the children, was
translated from Russian by Paul D.
Kalochov, a former student in the
College of Engineering.
Professor Trow has twice journied
to Europe in search of material. He
is also the author of Scientific
Methods in Education and Educa-
tional Psychology.

An additional gift of 10 incunabula
to the library's Stephen Spaulding
Collection was announced yesterday
by Miss E.M. Hymans, curator of the
rare book room. These books increase
the total number of incunabula in
the library to ,191 volumes, 18 of
which are in the Spaulding collection.
This recent gift of Colonel Thomas
M. Spaulding, '02, Miss Hyman says
is of utmost importance and value,
and will greatly increase the library's
collection of books printed before the
Fifteenth Century.
Incunabula are books printed with-
in the first 50 years of the invention,
of printing from movable type, before
1500. About 20,000 titles are known
to have been published in the Fif-
.eenth Century. The earliest is the
Latin Bible completed in 1445 at
Mainz by Johann Gutenberg and
Johann Fust. The Gutenberg Bible
is considered the greatest and most
beautiful as well as one of the rarest
books in the world.
The earliest Incunabulum in the
collection is an edition of Martial'sj
Epigrams, printed at Venice in 1480.1
All of them are in Latin, and 13 are
by Italian printers, 11 of whom were
Venetians. The output of Italian
presses was almost equal to that of
all Europe and there are probably
10,000 Italian incupabula still extant.
There are specimens of the work of
early German printers, Koelhoff and
and von Renchen in Cologne and
Pruss in Strassburg; an example of

the art of Amerbach, a printer of
Basel, and also one of the French
printer, Trechsel of Lyons.
History, religion, and literature are
the main subjects treated in these
volumes. Some are illustrated with
woodcuts, others are decorated with
manuscript or woodcut initials. A few
bear the characteristic mark of the
printers who made them. Some are
in their original covers of vellum, but
others have been rebound. Several of
the books belonged to famous collec-
tions as indicated by the monograms,
bookstamps, or bookplates of previous
owners. All are in good condition and
are perfectly legible after four and
a half centuries, just as when they
came off the press.
The Spaulding collection was
started by Colonel and Mrs. Spauld-
ing in honor of their son Stepehen,
who died in 1925. The memorial is in
the form of a fund, the income of
which is used to purchase books. All
of the volumes in the collection bear
a specially designed and etched book-
plate by a prominent bookplate artist.
This was also a gift of the Spauld-
ings.
The collection, begun in 1926, com-
prises 864 volumes. Most of them be-
long to the fields of English and
Hawaiian history. Some finely print-
ed editions of the classics are also in-
cluded, as well as several books on
military science, and transcripts and
source material obtained by Colonel
Spaulding in Hawaii.

.Almond Toffee 1
HOT FUDGE!,
SUNDAE
Chocolate
MALTED MILK
WITH WAFERS
15c
MILLER
DRUG STORE
Phone 9797
727 North University

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CAFETERIA Of Ann Arbor....
0 Note These Sunday Specials *

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Broiled Fillet Mignon with Bacon.. ......
Delicious Chicken a la King - Mushrooms.
Baked Swift's Premium Ham - Natural Gravy
Baked Fillet of Seafresh Flounder au gratin.
Fricasee of Golden West Fatted Chicken, Noodles
Broiled Large Steer T-Bone Steak, Butter Gravy .
Roast Loin of Pork - Home Made Dressing .

18c
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All Soups - Vegetables - Salads - Pies - Cakes - Beverages - 5c
THE TAVERN CAFETERIA

mike fingerle, prop.

Meal Tickets $5.50 for $5.00

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