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January 04, 1934 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-01-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICIHIGAN DAILY

Gray To Speak
Before Stalker
GroupSunday
Former Y.M.C.A. Worker
Served Prison Sentence
As Qbjector To War
Harold S. Gray, radical social
worker who served a year and a half
sentence in Alcatraz and Leaven-
worth Prisons for failure to submit
to a war time draft, will make his
first public appearance in years when
he addresses the Stalker Hall group
Sunday night.
The former head of the economics
department of the Central China
University returns from his retire-
ment on a co-operative farm near
Saline to make his first address in
Ann Arbor, speaking on the topic
"My Experiences As a Conscientious
Objector."
Mr. Gray was a Y.M.C.A. secretary,
working among the German war
prisoners in England, when he was
drafted by the American govrn-
ment. Upon his refusal ot submit
to the draft, he was sentenced to a
prison term. He was first placed at
hard labor in Alcatraz Prison in San
Francisco Bay, but was later trans-
ferred to Leavenworth.
The letters he sent to his mother
during his prison sentence are to be
published next month by Harper's,
under the title, "Character -Bad."
These two words were written by
the warden on his dismissal blank
from Leavenworth.
Mr. Gray is one of the outstand-
ing social workers in this country, as
well as in Europe and China. He
numbers among his friends Norman
Thomas, Sherwood Eddy, and Kerby
Page.
Grau Plans To
ResignPosition
As Cuban Head
Constitutional Assembly Is
To Meet Then; Elections,
Called For In Decree
HAVANA, Jan. 3.-(P)-President
Grau San Martin's announcement
that he would resign and hints drop-
ped by the author of a political coun-
ciliation plan brought new hopes for
pece to strife-weary Cuba today.
Without detailed explanation, Grau
made it known Tuesday he would
leave office after May 22 -when a
corstitutional assembly is scheduled
to meet. The President also signed
a decree setting April 22 as the date
of the elections for the assembly.
Dr. Benjamin Fernadez de Medi-
ina, Uruguayan minister, and leader
in efforts to settle on a plan to re-
store political tranquility, aroused
speculattion concerning his move-
'mets today.
After continued conferences, the
minister smilingly declined to dis-
cuss his progress, but said:
"Iwill have big news soon."
For w e e k s oppositionists have
sought Grau's resignation, asserting
his retirement was essential for
smoothing out differences between
Cuba's warring political factions.
Grau said he would return to the
practice of his profession, surgery.
u Yi To Take
Emperor Post

In Manchukuo
Other Important Changes
In State's Government
To Be Made Jan. 15
TOKIO, Jan 3.-(/P)-Henry Pu
Yi, 28-year-old chief executive of
the Japanese-assisted state of Man-
chukuo, soon will be made emperor,
it was reported on high authority to-
dlay.
Announcement of his elevation in-
volving other important governmen-
tal changes, is expected to be made
Jan. 15, a Rengo (Japanese) news
agency dispatch said.
The dispatch f o m Hsinching
(Manchuria)twere taken over by
described as expected announce-
ment as "an important manifesto
concerning the future policy of Man-
chukuo, which will have a wide-
spread effect on Manchukuo's 30'-
'00,000 inhabitants. It was learned
the contemplated changes will be
made March 1.
It was widely reported the govern-
mentalsalterations involvehestablish-
ment of a new fundamental law.
patterned after Japan's.
Manchu and Mongol supporters
of the Hsinching regime long have
campaigned for restoration of the
monarchical titles and dignities upon
young Pu-Yi.
He was named to office when the
former three e a s t e r n provinces

Ouija Disciple

Student Co-Operation Asked
In Roosevelt Benefit Da ce
Student co-operation in an all- aminations will be going on at that
city ball to be held Jan. 30 in cele- time.
bration of President Roosevelt's The stated purpose of the observ-
birthdd trdaybance is: "To establish through the
birhda wa mae ystedayby ep-direct help of the citizens of the
resentatives of the American Legion, country an endowment for the Geor-
the Chamber of Commerce, and the gia Warm Springs Foundation, cre-
Trades and Labor Council. Proceeds ated in 1926 by President Roosevelt,
from the dance will be used to aid so that this foundation may carry on
the Warm Springs Foundation for its national crusade against infantile
crippled children. paralysis, and devote unselfishly its
The ball, which is to be one of a full energy and thought to the co-
number of similar nationwide func- ordination of the fight against the
tions, will be held in the Masonic scourge which physically handicaps,
Temple and tickets will be $1 a every year, thousands of American
couple. One hour of the function children."
will be set aside for an address by
President Roosevelt, who will speak Methods of testing milk and its
to the parties from Washington. products for the quality and composi-
Officials of the Undergraduate ( tion, as well as manufacturing meth-
Council, who were asked by the lo- ods and practical dairy plant opera-
cal cemmitte to aid in the holding tion, will be given in a twelve weeks
of the ball, said last night that the ocurse in dairy manufacturing which
affair came at a bad time for stu- recently opened at the tniversity of
dent participation, inasmuch as ex- Wisconsin.

Court Rules On
Three CasessIn
A Blusv Session

Two Men Found Guilty
Firs1 Degree Murder
Hawley Is Acquitted

Of
As

cluse, George Reed, Detroit fireman,
began for the third time his defense
of the charge of the murder of his
wife last spring.
After he had confessed to the
crime before Sheriff Jacob Andres
and Prosecutor Albert J. Rapp, Reed
was sent to solitary confinement and
hard labor at Marquette, a maximum
penalty in Michigan. Prosecutor
Rapp maintained that the crime was
premeditated and not the act of an
insane person. In response to a
plea for leniency, Judge George W.
Sample sentenced Reed to Jackson
Prison at hard labor and solitary
confinement.

Dr. Crummer Dies
After Long Illness
Word has been received of the
death of Dr. Henry Leroy Crummer,
'93, in Los Angeles, after a lingering
illness of four years. He succumbed
to heart disease. He is the author
of "Clinical History of Heart Dis-
ease." At the time of his death he
was a member of the American Med-
ical Association, a fellow of the Royal
Society of Medicine in England, and
had been a captain in the medical
corps during the War.

Closing one of the most important
and busiest sessions in the history
of Washtenaw County's Circuit
Court, two men were found guilty of
first degree murder as the jury ig-
nored their pleas of insanity, while
19-year old Ransom Hawley, Jr., was
acquitted on the charge of robbery
armed. The jury accepted his plea
of temporary insanity because of a
head cold. He is now awaiting med-
ical examination.
Following close on the heels of
Brent Dunn's sentence of life im-
prisonment at Jackson Prison for the
murder of John Reinhart, aged re-

TOMORROW - The event you 'e waited for.
Read Friday's Michigan Daily

Ik

11

-Associated Press Photo
Mattie Turley, 17 (above), was
held at St. Johns, Ariz., after she
pleaded guilty to a charge of at-
tempted murder of her father, Ernest
J. Turley, retired naval officer. She
said she followed instructions of an
ouija board. Turley's wife (below),
also was held on charges of in-
fluencing her daughter.
Michigan Five
Defeats State
Norma429-Il
Ragged Play Mars Game
As Cagers Win Second
Contest Of Season
(Continued from Page 1)
play, Beyer, substitute Normal for-
ward received a bad knee injury
and had to be carried from the floor.
The Wolverines added to their lead at
will, Tessmer countingntwice, Fish-
man and Plummer once each from
the floor and Petoskey and Allen
scored on free throws to end the
Michigan s co r ing. Hanneman
scored a field goal, and Goode and
Rukamp sank free throws to bring
the Normal total to 11.
Plummer, f.......2 0 1 4
Regeezi, f ........0 0 0 0
Levine ...........0 0 0 01
Fishman, f .......0 0 0 0
Ford, f..........0 1 0 1
Rudness, f.......2 1 0 5
Allen ............2 0 2 4
Jablonski, c......1 0 3 2
Lcis, c.........0 0 0 0
Pct-teskey, g ...... 2 1 1 5
ToiMagno, g ......1 0 2 2
Tessmer, g .......3 0 2 6
13 3 11 29
NORMAL FG FT PF TP
Cut-de, f.......... 0 3 1 3
Bayer, f .........0 0 2 0
1laidt, f ..........1 0 1 2
Hannenan, c .....1 3 1 5
l~ukamp, c.......0 1 1 1
Ostlund, g.......0 0 0 0
Maska, g........0 0 0 0
irkse, g ........0 0 1 0
Oliver, g .........0 0 0 0
2 7 7 11
ofbials-Powers, Detroit; Bech-
tal, Wittenberg.
- - --- --

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ENTIRES
E ' 'S

MUST

BE TURNED

All Florsheim's Included at $4.95-" $5.95 and $7.85

STORE CLOSED
ALL DAY TH.U RS.
to Arrange and Mark
Down Our Immense Stock
Sve Opens Friday

$5,000 MUST BE RAISED AT ONCE
Economic conditions and slow buying have left our shelves filled
with high grade shoes that must be sold and paid for without
delay.
BUY 2 OR 3 PAIRS AT THESE SENSATIONAL PRICES

This Sale Is For
CASH - No Charges
EXTRA SALESMEN
TO SERVE YOU
ALL SALES FINAL

11

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LADIES

HIERE ARE SALE PRICES
* " * * that will interest every woman in Ann Arbor

$8.75 to $10.00
Elorsheim Shoes

100 Prs. Cut to
200 Prs. Cut to
300 Prs. Cut to

$4.95
$5.95
$7.85

Welcome
for a New Year
Your Food
Problem Solved
at
BOESKY'S

NEVER AGAIN SUCH PRICES
OVER 200 PAIRS OF OUR
FORMER $8 and $9 SHOES
Scotch Grain - Kid - or Calf Skin
Black or brown. New $ 45
styles. For quick sale
Now ................. and $6.45
175 PAIRS OF OUR
FORMER $6, $7 AND $8 SHOES
Black or Brown Calf or
Scotch Grain. New Styles $445
Now ................
150 PAIRS OF OUR $9
and $10 Shoes. Styles to
be discontinued. A rare S .8
buy at ................and $5.8
One Big Lot of
$5.00 and $6.00 Shoes
SPECIAL PRICE
FOR THIS SALE$ .
FORMAL SHOES for Dress Wear

200 Pairs Black and Brown Ties - In Kid, Calf or$
Snake Trim. Regular $5 and $6 values .. ... . . .
Women's Fine Strap Pumps, in Kid or Calf. Medium $ 85
or high heels-black or brown. $7.50 values
150 Pairs of Pumps and Oxfords in medium or low
heels-- $4.50, $5.00 and $6.00 values.
YOU WOMEN WHO WEAR HI-GRADE SHOES $6 85
Read this! We are offering 200 pairs of our very finest n
$10 and $11 new shoes - with a special arch support $
e - Closing them out at $5.85
150 Pairs of Women's Fine Oxfords in Brown and
Black soft Calf - Medium heel for street and campus $4.85
wear. Very comfortable and long wearing. $7.50 value
Women's Regent Pumps in Black or Brown Suede - $3-85
and
Dress heel. Regular $5.00 to $7.50 value, now . . . $485
FLORSHEIM SHOES
For women. 2 00 Prs. - r
$10Values-cut to .. $4.95 $5.0 $6.95
WOMEN'S GALOSHES .. 89c, $1.45 and $2.45
THE GREATEST SALE IN OUR HISTORY - DO NOT MISS IT
H USE SLIPPE RS-Values up to $4.00
Now 89c *I.39 and 2.45

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Quality and Price
that will please
you, too-
Breakfast,
Lunch, Dinner, or
after the, theatre

COME EARLY!
Styles will not be replenished when sold
out. Buy several pairs while prices are so
low.

NOT QUITTiNG BUSINESS
This is simply a determined effort to con-
vert a large portion of this fine stock of
shoes into cash at once. It must be done.
We need the money.

u

Values to $8.
Now $3.95 and

50
$5.85

STORE CLOSED THURSDAY-SALE OPENS FRIDAY AT 9:00 O'CLOCK

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