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December 15, 1933 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-12-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

CHIGAN DAILY
Established_1890

...

jj

crammed full of the lovely voices of children, care-
fully disciplined and sometimes rising to thrilling
heights of beauty. A critic, no matter how in-
significant, can almost always summon enough
impudence to adopt a patronizing air with pro-
fssional singers, but there is something about
> the unaffected singing of children that causes the
critic to be just a bit awe-struck.
"Hansel and Gretel," then, is a beautiful de-
parture from reality. Mr. Kenneth Marantette
did an excellent job of direction, and the children
players should be pleased with themselves. It
must be an awful lot of fun to be an actor in a
piece like that.
4 - - . - . _ - - . . r d. . .. - _ _ _ - 4 ,

Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa--
tion a I the Big Ten News Service.
s0arttd atg it rgg
-~ 1933 (~,~of -." n e.. _ 3EAE ~S
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
r.ne Associated Press is exclusivel:, entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this 'paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
dntered at the Post Office at Ann Arjor, Michigan, as
second class matter, Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-Genemtl.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mal.
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $3.75; by
mail, $4.25.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Rneprese\atives: College Publications Representatives
Inc., 40 Eost Thirty-fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylston Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANLGING EDITOR ......... THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
CITY EDITOR.. ..................BRACKLEYSHAW
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR............C. HART SCHAAF
SPORTS EDITOR............ ALBERT ..H. NEWMAN
WOMEIT'S EDITOR.............ALCAROL J. HANAN
NIGHI EDITORS: A. Ellis BlI, Ralph G. Coulter, Wi-
lain G. Ferris, John C. Healey, E. Jerome Pettit, George
Van Vieck, Guy M. Whippe, Jr.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Donald R. Bir,
Arthur W. Carstens, Sidney Frankel, Roland L. Martin,
Marjorie Western.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Eleanor Blum, Lois Jotter, Marie
Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan.
REPORTERS: Ogden G. Dwight, Paul J. Elliott, Courtney;
A. Evans, Ted R. Evans, Bernard H. Fried, Thomas
Groehn, Robert D. Guthrie, Joseph L. Karpinski,
Thomas H. Kleene, Richard E. Lorch, David G. Mac-.
Donald, Joel P. Newman, Kenneth Parker, William R.,
Reed, Robert S. Ruwitch, Robert J. St. Cair, Arthur S.
Settle, Marshall D. Silverman, A. B. Smith, Jr., Arthur
M. Taub, Philip T. Van Zile.
WOMEN REPORTERS: Dorothy Gies, Jean Hanmer,
Florence Harper, Marie Heid, Eleanor Johnson, .Jose-
phine McLean Marjorie Morrison, Sally Place, Rosalie
Resnick, Mary Robinson, Jane -Schneider.I1
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER ..... W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER..........BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER .... .... ......M
........................ CATHARINE MC HENRY]
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Fred Her-1
trick; Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Contracts, Jack Bellamy; Advertising Service, Robert;
Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circulation, Jack Ef-
roymson.
ASSISTANTS: Meigs Bartmess, Van Dunakin, Milton Kra-°
mer, John Ogden, Bernard Rosenthal, Joe Rothbard,
James Scott, David Winkworth.
WOMEN'S BUSINESS STAFF
Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell, Winifred Bell, MaryB urley,
Peggy Cady, Betty Chapman, Patricia Daly, Jean Dur-a
ham, Minna Giffen, Doris Gimmy, Billie Griffiths, Janet
Jackson, Isabelle Kanter, Louise Krause, Margaret
Mustard, Nina Pollock, Elizabeth J. Simonds.
NIGHT EDITOR: GEORGE VAN VLECK
Communication
Consolidation. .
ALTHOUGH the inter-departmental -
committee at Washington which ;
has been studying consolidation proposals for the .
nation's radio, telephony, and telegraphy servicesI
has as yet made no final recommendations, the
latest news dispatches make it appear probable
that monopolistic combination to be administered
under strong government control will be advised.
Monopoly would mean cheaper overhead for the;
businesses involved, and should result in more
efficient nation-wide service. Government con-t
trol would keep down consumer rates. It is be-,
cause the report points to these conclusions thati
current opinion has it the recommendation for;
consolidation will be made.
It is almost certain, according to the Associated1
Press, that legislation demanding unification will 1
be introduced during the coming session of the
legislature. What the administration's point of'
view will be is still unknown, but if the com-
mittee's report indicates a true condition the pres-
ident should and will support combination.
The Theatre
AT THE LYDIA MENDELSSOHN
"HANSEL AND GRETEL"
A REVIEW'
By JOHN W. PRITCHARD
Hundreds of Ann Arbor school children had the

time of their lives yesterday afternoon when Han-
sel, Gretel, the Gingerbread Witch, and the whole
shebang came to life on the stage of the Men-
delssohn Theatre. The Children's Theatre, which
has been interested in producing plays that chil-
dren and adults may enjoy equally (although for
different reasons), departed from its custom when
it presented this favorite of fairy stories with a
cast in which not a single grownup appears. Papa
and Mama Gretel, the old witch, and all the other
enchanting characters are portrayed by students
of Tappan Junior High School.
"Hansel and Gretel," first of a series to be pre-
sented by the Children's Theatre, will also be
shown this afternoon and tonight. "Jack and the
Beanstalk" is scheduled for Jan. 11-13, "The Pied
Piper" for March 1-3.
There are color and song in great profusion,
dances galore, and some very exciting action in
many places. The production, in fact, was largely
pantomime, in which choral work by students in
the balcony under the direction of Miss Ragnhild
Moe was flawlessly correlated with dialogue and

screen Keflections
rccommended; two stars, average; one star, inferior:
Four stars means extraordinary; three stars definitely
no stars, stay away from it.

AT THE MICHIGAN
"CRADLE SONG"

**

Sister Johanna .... Dorothea Wieck
Thresa ............. Evelyn Venable
The Doctor...... Sir Guy Standing
"Cradle Song" takes you behind the scenes in
a convent. It is the story of Sister Johanna, a
young girl about to take the vows who cannot
forget her family and the outside world to which
she is accustomed until someone leaves a baby at
the convent. The nuns break all customs and
arrange to keep the child instead of sending it to
the orphanage. Sister Johanna raises the child,
and in the course of doing so develops a mother'
love which becomes the theme of the whole pic-
ture.
Full of pathos and religion, this production
moves along in a very sombre manner. There are
amusing parts, especially in the earlier part of
the plot when the young girls who are about to
take the vows play pranks that shock the older
sisters. But solemnity predominates, and this
gives the producers a chance to accent the theme
with beautiful sets and excellent photography.
This they have done, and this is the best part of
the picture.
Dorothea Wieck as Sister Johanna does not
have a great deal to do except to look pathetic
and to show off her beauty which is accentuated
by her nun's robes. The ingune, Evelyn Venable,
is a new young actress whose freshness is very
well suited to the part she plays. The picture
just misses being a very good one because there
just is not enough of the something that could
be there to make it exceptional. But it is very
restful in the way that going into an empty
church and just sitting is.
The Michigan's added attractions are another
haunted house comedy, a news reel, and a Vin-'
cent Lopez musical short with Armida doing the'
rumba. This last piece is disappointing because
it works up to the point where it would be enter-..
taining, and then ends. The censors must have
got hold of it.
-C. B. C.
Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disre-
garded. The names of communicants will, however,
be regarded as confidential upon request. Contribu-
tors are asked to be brief, confining themselves to
less than 500 words if possible.
MICHIGAN NEEDS
A CODE OF HONOR
To the Editor:-
It appears that there is no other event quite
capable of arousing the feeling of racial equality
in Michigan to a higher pitch than inter-racial
rape in Alabama. In two short years the milling,
mob-mad crowd crying for the blood of confessed
attackers and murderers before the doors of the
Washtenaw county jail is forgotten, although at,
times one hears a self satisfied individual relate
how one of the criminals fell into the cement mill
at the Marquette branch prison.
To be sure, the South is aroused over the Scotts-
boro case; and the fact, that after three times
convicting some of the participants to hang sen-
timent still exists to prolong the proceedings, is
a full page advertisement for lynching. In as
much as three juries of southern men have rec-
ommended that some members of the accused
hang, sufficient proof must have been offered for
the necessity of exacting such an extreme penalty.
The Daily would have one believe that Alabama
hangings are as much sport as a Michigan foot-
ball game.
The editorial "Scottsboro Boys" in last Sat-
urday morning's Daily was set off strikingly by
the twelve line news article found on the front
uage of the same issue in which Jesse Crawford,
who, after extradition to Georgia had been re-
fused last January by Governor Comstock, was
stated to have committed criminal attack in Mich-
igan and was then sentenced to Marquette prison
for from 10 to 20 years. Regardless of the South-
ern Codes, if the honor of Northern women may
be held so cheaply, then the Governor of Alabama
should parole the nine defendants to the state of
Michigan.
Harold P. Hesler, Grad.
b- out- oks
Aout Books
"'S

turned last June bearing copious notes from
chance conversation and formal -interviews with
all classes of people,
In arrangement, the book appears to be largely
a collection of pages selected from a very complete
daily journal. After one page devoted to the jour-
ney from Ann Arbor to a state room on a Grman
liner, Miss Gwiazdowska launches into an account
of her conversation witht "Fritz", one of Hitler's
agents who was returning to Germany. A meet-
ing with a Russian production engineer follows.
After that comes a description of the workers at
the institute, mostly Jews; a description of the
Warsaw ghetto; and a host of brief stories about
Jews and Polish revolutionaries as well as more
interviews.
The book is not a finished work, in the literary
sense. It jumps from incident to discussion and
from a secretarial reproduction of an interview to
an analysis of character. A few ideas are repeated
and a few incidents which might have been
grouped together are scattered throughout. A
rapid reader might have difficulty in gleaming all
the good thoughts from the book.
But the thoughts are there. And, while they are
scattered throughout, Miss Gwiazdowska sums
most of them up in the final chapter. She finds
that the saner minds in Poland agree that the
way to solve the problem of racial antipathy and
to improve the slum conditions of the ghetto is by
education. She also finds that the stories of Nazi
oppression against the Jews are not exaggerated.
Miss Gwiazdowska holds no prejudice for the
Jews, however. In fact, she makes very strong
charges against the rich Jews who, she says, hob-
nob with leading Berlin storm troopers while the
poor Jewish shopkeepers are starved and killed.
From this discussion of the Jewish problem, the
book takes up the general subject of social im-
provement. After citing frequent wars and social
upheavals in which Jews have played a prominent
part, usually as victims, Miss Gwiazdowska con-
cludes with what is probably the most significant
idea in the book. She says:
"Evolution sometimes uses war, revolution, and
even massacres as the tools to accomplish the de-
sired results.
"The Jews are an ideal instrument of social
evolution."
Musical Evvents
MARIE OLSZEWSKA'S
CONCERT IN REVIEW
Were this concert to be reviewed in the manner
of the neighboring column, Screen Reflections, I
would have three stars placed at the left of the
caption to indicate its rating. Of course a con-
cert can rarely be performed a second time as it
was the first, even were it the type of entertain-
ment that is repeated. The point I wish to make
is this, it was a concert decidedly above the usual
vocal soloist's program, as has been done in the
past few years, and it was decidedly pleasureable.
But it seemed to miss the vitality of an abso-
lutely four-star performance. If the same concert
could be heard again, it would be well worth hear-
ing.
Madame Olszewska has a flexible voice, a bi-
voice, for, risking being termed flip, I would say,
"she can pick a high note, and she can pick a
low note," jumping from one range to another
with extraordinary ease and consistent timbre.
Her introductory aria, "Ombra mai fu," from
Handel's opera "Xerxes" was done with a great
feeling for the style and melody. Continuing the
Italian line, the technical exhibitionism of which
is not obnoxious, were two that were charming
in their lightness and piquancy. A third, Il Mio
Bel Foco, in a more serious vein, showed the low
register of Madame Olszewska's voice to good ad-
vantage. She appeared at her best in the lyric
sort of thing, especially in the outstanding Brahms
"Die Mainacht" and the Strauss "Traum durch
die Daemmerung." Her dramatic flair, perhaps
operatic is the word, was felt in Strauss' "Ruhe
Meine Seele" and the Brahms "Von Ewiger Liebe."
Charmingly sung were the quaint, bright songs
like the "Blinde Kuh" of Brahms and the two
"Staendchen" of Brahms and Strauss respectively.
The "Habenera" from "Carmen" was done in an
almost passive manner as though it were actually
conversation.
Frederick Schauwecker proved a reliable accom-

panist in his playing, although he did have to tear
out after his music for the last number of the
Strauss group. He and Madame Olszewska got
along famously together, with sufficient infor-
mality to keep things going. Perhaps a strictly
formal presentation would have suited the pro-
gram. It was far above the vocal concerts that
were given last year, though not as popular. I
think most every one there last night would go
again to hear Olszewska and her Brahms and
Strauss and Handell, since it was a three star per-
formance.
-S. P.
Collegit O erve-%r

S
E
N
I
0
Rt
DEC. 1 5
P
I
C
T7
I
R
E

t .,

the Best Wishes for a Merry Christmas
an a i fl y holiday Seasoui/
'During the coming year
we hope to be able to render the

q& c

wish to extend to you all

careful attention

which has

always been a part -of Varsiy's
Phone 2-3123
Liberty at Fifth

at Dey's
Spedding's
Rentschl er's

- '- II

I ' ,

CRI STmmmAS GI FTS
The Newest and Best in
BOOKS, STATIONERY, NOVELTIES, ETC.
THE NEW MICHIGAN CALENDAR
*-
UNIVER5SITY
WAHR BOOKSTORE
STATE STREET MAIN STREET
Open Evenings Until Christmas
ReligiusActivities

First Methodist
Episcopal Church
A COMMUNITY CATHEDRAL
State and Washington
Ministers
Frederick s. Fisher
Peter F. Stair
10:45-Morning Worship.
Sermon Subject:
"The Hills of Jerusalem"
Dr. Fisher
7:30 P.M. - Evening worship. Sermon
Subject:
"The Prophecy"
Presented in song, Scripture, and
tableau. Director, Mrs. Stair.
STALKER HALL
(For Students)
3:00 P.M. - International Student
Forum.
6:00 P.M.-Christmas Drama followed
by Fellowship Hour.

DO NOT
N EGLECT
YOUR
RELIGIOUS
ATIVITI ES

Zion Lutherant
church
Washington St. at 5th Ave.
E. C. Stellhorn, Pastor
9:00 a.m.-ible School. Lesson topic:
"Paul at Rome"
9:00 A.M. -Service in the German
Language.
10:30 A.M. - Service with sermon by
the Pastor-
"The Royal Edict; Proclaim
the kingdom"
No Meeting of the Stucent lub this
week.

"IN THE CLUTCHES OF THE JEWS"
By MARIE Z. GWIAZDOWSKA
(University Town Publishers, Ann Arbor)
By HUGH MOORE
HERE is a book especially significant at a time
when the eyes of the world have been turned
to the problem of anti-Jewish feeling by the ac-
tivities of the German Nazis. It is an unprejudical
account of typical experiences and conversations
which the author had with Hitlerites, Russians,
Poles, and Jews during a year she spent in War-
saw. I recommend it to all who have been follow-
ing the discussion in the Campus Opinion column
of the Daily following "A Friend of Sanity's" con-
tribution.

By BUD BERNARD
Members of the Beliot College faculty and their
wives have adopted an NRA code which they hope
will prevent over-working of college party chap-
erones.
The code suggests the college regulations be
changed to require one couple to chaperon a
party of two, and ask that the chaperon assign-
ments be rotated so each faculty member will not
have to attend more than one or two parties each
semester.
** *
One ingenious co-ed at the University of North
Carolina has found a way to fight the alleged de-
pression through the medium of an unattended
candy stand. The school's honor system is relied
upon to furnish the necessary protection.
But who would want to steal the little girl's
candy anyway?
* * *
Two professors in France are said to have dis-
covered a new poison gas against which gas masks,

I

St. Paul's Lutheran
(Missouri Synod)
West Liberty and Third Sts.
Dec. 17-9:30 a.m. Service in German;
10:45 a.m. Service in English; 7:30
p.m., 3rd Evening Advent Service.
Dec. 24-9:30 a.m., Service in German
10:45 a.m., Service in English; 6:30
p.m., Children's Service.
Dec. 25-9:30 a.m., Service in German
10:45 a.m., Service in English.
Dec.-9:3 a-~m., Se'rvice in German

The Fellowship of
Liberal Religion
(Unitarian)
State and Huron Streets
Sunday Morning at 10:45
"Three Pillars of Life"
By Mr. Marley

St. Andrews
Episcopal Church
Division at Catherine Street
Services of Worship
Sunday, December~ 17, 1933
8:00 A.M. - Holy Communion
9:30 AM.- Church School
11:00 AM. -Kindergarten

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