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December 10, 1933 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-12-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1s3 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGI

Radio Programs
Will, Be Stopped
During Vacation
Carrothlers Will Continue
Educational Feature On
Air Tonight
Stanton Will Speak
'Russia We Recognized' Is
To Be His Topic; Hard
Also On Program

Lindberghs Will Fly Into Brazil Jungle From Natal

Campus broadcasts from the Mor-
ris Hall studios of WJR over the Uni-
versity hour will be discontinued
after this week due to the Christmas
recess, until Sunday, Jan. 7, when
the parent program will re-open the
series.
The parent hour at 6 p. m. today
will featurehProf. George E. Carroth-
ers of the School of Education, and
Director of the Bureau of Co-opera-
tion withsEducational Institutions,
who will speak on "A High School
Curriculum Organized to Meet
Changed Conditions." The address
given in this series by Prof. Raleigh
Schorling last Sunday had the great-
est response of any program broad-
cast this year, it was said.
The Michigan program broadcast
at 10 p. m. Thursday will include a
discussion of "The Russia We Recog-
nized" by John W. Stanton of the
History Department, and "What is
the Pink Toothbrush" by Dorothy G.
Hard of the School of Dentistry.
The school programs for grade and
high school students will go on the
air at 2 p. m. The Tuesday program
will continue the astronomical series,
with Prof. Dean B. McLaughlin talk-
ing on "The Sun." On Wednesday
Prof. Jean Paul Slusser will discuss
"Water Colors in Painting," while on
Thursday Matt Mann, Varsity swim-
ming coach, will give the second in
the series of athletic talks, speaking
on his own sport, "Swimming." The
Friday program will feature Prof.
David E. Mattern of the School of
Music, who will use as his topic,
"Music as a Career."
Prof. Joseph E. Maddy of the
School of Music will continue his in-
struction in instrumental and vocal
music on the morning program on
Monday and Tuesday at 9:15 a. m.
and at 2 p. m. on Tuesday.
Tapping, Blott To Talk
At Football Banquet'
T. Hawley Tapping, general secre-
tary of the Alumni Association, and
Jack, Blott,; assistant football coach,
will be speakers at the banquet of
the University of Michigan Club at
Youngstown to be held Dec. 22. The
banquet is being held to honor Wil-
liam' Renner, '35, and Chet Beard,
'35.
Art is a luxury. Men attach im-
portance only to self-preservation and
the propagation of their species. It is
only when these instincts are satis-
fled that they consent to occupy
themselves with the entertainment
which is provided for them by writers,
painters, and poets.- W. Somerset
Maughan.

-Associated Press Photo
Col. and Mrs. Charles A. Lindbergh are shown in their ocean-spanning plane, with a map of their 1,875-
mile hop from Bathurst, Gambia to Natal, Brazil. They decided definitely yesterday to fly 80 miles up the
Amazon river to Manaos.

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
day, December 11, 8:00 p. m., in room
will speak on "Product Integrals and
Applications," and Dr. John D. Elder
will report on the Cincinnati meeting.
Please note the change of date.
Economics Club: Meeting on Mon-
day, December 11, at 7:45, Mr. Philip
Sullivan will speak on "Chinese Eco-
nomic Policies." The Club will meet
at the Union. Members of the staffs
in Economics and Business Adminis-
tration, and graduate students in
these departments, are invited.
Acolytes (Philosophical Society):
Professor-Emeritus Joseph L. Drake,
of the Law School, will speak on
"Philosophy of Law: Juristic Ideal-
ism and Legal Practice," Monday
evening, 7:30, Room 202 South Wing.
Students interested in philosophy and
in law are invited.
Camp Davis: Pictures of Camp Da-
vis and adjoining country will be
shown in Room 246, West Engineer-
ing Building, at 2:00 p. m. Monday,
December 13. All interested are in-
vited to attend.
Luncheon for Graduate Students
on Wednesday, Decemebr 13, in the
Russian Tea Room of the Michigan
League. Cafeteria service. Dr. Carl
Guthe, member of the Graduate'

Board and Director of the Museum
of Antropology, will describe the
research work in antropology, now
being carried on by the University..
Foods And Their Relationship To
Diseases. This lecture will be de-
livered by Dr. Herbert W. Emerson,
Director of Pasteur Institute and
Professor of Bacteriology, on Dec-
ember 13, Wednesday at 3:00, Ann
Arbor Chamber of Commerce. This
lecture is sponsored by the Ann Arbor
Restaurant Association, and should
be of interest to public health stu-
dents and the public in general.
Varsity Glee Club: Special rehear-
sal imperative for entire club and
additional men attending Chevrolet
national banquet at Detroit. Meet
at clubrooms, third floor Union, Mon-
day 7:15 p.m.
Varsity Band: Full band rehearsal
Monday at 5:00 p.m. All men plan-
ning to take Detroit trip must be pre-
sent.
Outdoor Club: There will be a skat-
ing party at the Coliseum Monday
night from 7 until 10:30. Special rates
will be given to all members carrying
Outdoor Club memberships. All de-
siring to participate must register
with Miss McCormick at the League.
Faculty Women's Club: There will
be a formal reception and dance for
members and their husbands on
Tuesday, Dec. 12, 9 p. m. in the Mich-
igan League Ballroom.
Monday Evening Drama Section

Jewish-Gentile
Problem Cited
AL Symposiumn
Intolerance Is G r o w i ng,
Waterman Says; Seven
Others On Program
(Continued from Page 1)
cial, religious, or national differences
are due in the last analysis to eco-
nomic competition for land, jobs, and
business opportunities.
Nazi oppression of the Jews in Ger-
Imany is due in some measure to this
reason, in Professor Dickinson's opin-
ion, the National Socialists having
promised to take the jobs away from
the Jews and give them to Aryan
Germans.
Professor McKenzie, presenting the
viewpoint of the sociologist on the
question, stated that intolerance is
merely the unwillingness of a man to
have an open mind in regard to a
new situation, adding that complete
tolerance on any question would re-
sult 'in an entire lack of character,
mentality, or opinions.
The-influence of the family as an
important phase of intolerance was"
also pointed out by Professor Mc-
Kenzie, who mentioned the intoler-
ance in Europe and in-this country
during the War towards any senti-
ments: which were regarded as crit-
icism of the government or of tradi-
tional beliefs.
Calls Society a Citadel
"Modern society is a citadel," he
said, "which is supported by two pil-
lars - the individual and the organi-
zation - between which there is con-
tinuous conflict, complete ascendency
of the individual being anarchy,
whereas complete ascendency of the
organization has a tendency to stifle
all progress. Emotional uniformity
begets intolerance."
The intolerance that is caused by
training from early childhood is the
field which must be attacked by edu-
cational mediums, Professor McKen-
zie believes.
Speaking on the religious aspects
day afternoons, December 13 and 14,
from 2:00 until 5:00 p. m. There will
be competent supervision, including a
trained nurse. For further informa-
tion as to place, etc., kindly call Mrs.
Fohl, 5484. All mothers interested
are urged to communicate promptly
in order to facilitate adequate ar-

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of intolerance, Professor Sellars de-
clared that in his opinion, the reason
for the large amount of intolerance
in the past on religious questions is
that it is the emotions rather than
the intellect that are called into play
to control men's actions in the relig-
ious field.
Speaks of Greek Attitude
The lack of religious intolerance
during the times of the Greeks and
Romans, he said, is primarily due to
the apathetic and almost purely in-
tellectual attitude which these people
had towards their religion. With the
influx of other religions from the-
East, emotion entered the field,

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bringing with it intolerance and
heresy.
Professor Pillsbury stressed the fact
that the question of tolerance and
intolerance is entirely relative, and
entered a plea for enough tolerance
to accept the truth and enough in-
tolerance to reject what is false No
individual ever was significantly in-
tolerant unless he was backed by a
group.
Most intolerance is bred of ignor-
ance or unwillingness to accept the
truth, he declared, adding that in-
tolerance most often appears on sub-
jects concerning which there are few
absolutely provable facts.

*1
'A,

will meet at 7:30 p. m. at the Mich-
igan"Union,Dec. 11.
French Club: Christmas party
Wednesday, Dec. 13, promptly at 8:00
at the League. Members are asked
to bring a ten cent gift accompanied
by a French jingle.
Michigan Dames: Home-making
group will meet at the home of Mrp.
Fred Morgan, 1426 Brooklyn, on
Tuesday, December 12, 8:00 p. m.
Miss Elizabeth Martin of Foster's
Gift Shop will demonstrate interest-
ing ways of wrapping Christmas
packages.
Faculty Women's Club: The Play-
Reading Section will meet on Tues-
day, December 12, at 2:15 promptly,
Michigan Union.
Garden Section of the Faculty
Women's Club will meet Wednesday,1
December 13, at 3 o'clock in the
Alumnae room, Michigan League.
Professor E. C. Goddard will give an
illustrated lecture entitled "Highway
Beautification."
Faculty Wives and Michigan,
Dames: The home-making group of
the Michigan Dames plans to spon-
sor a nursery for the care of small

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