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November 24, 1933 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1933-11-24

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TIHE MICHIGAN DAILY

a vital social religion. His lectures and writings
in the social and economic fields have shown him
to be a practical thinker along these lines. He is,
in a measure, an answer to the critics of religion
who maintain it to be interested only in philo-
sophical and theosophical questions.
Thus, we believe that the presence of Dr. Ward
in Ann Arbor under the auspices of the S. C. A.,
the Presbyterian students, the Council of Religion,
and the Ann Arbor Ministerial Association, for a
series of four lectures on the problem "Religion
and Our Economic Crisis," the first of which will
be presented today, the second tomorrow, and the
last two on Sunday, are significant and should
interest a cosmopolitan University student body.
Social religion is as old as the prophets, but
still an unlimited field. Here is a chance for our
religious enthusiasts and our skeptics to hear a
great teacher of social religion and also for liberal
thinkers of all kinds to be stimulated and find
a firmer basis for their thinking.
Screen Reflections
Four stars means extraordinary; three stars definitely
recommended; two stars, average; one star, inferior;
no stars, stay away from it.

W *4 BAWNO4MjLOVTVEi IW ~~ fT)~AM '4vO
Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student'Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
tion 4- the Big Ten News Service.
uzociated Qllfoetiat4 rca
1933 a noNxt covuuE 1934-
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusivelr entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan. as
second class matter. Special raeo f postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-Generl.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail.
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $3.75; by
mnail, $4.25.
Offices:Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 21214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives,
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylston Street, Boston; 612 north Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR..........THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
CITY EDITOR..................... BRACKLEY SHAW
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR............. C. HART SCHAAF
SPORTS EDITOR...................ALBERT H. NEWMAN
WOME'S EDITOR....................CAROL J. HANAN
NIGHTI EDITORS: A. Ellis BI], Ralph G. Coulter Wi-
iam G. Ferris, John C. Healey, E. Jerome Pettit, George
Van Vleck, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
$5PORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Donald R. Bird,
Arthur W. Carstens, Sidney Frankel, Roland L. Martin,
Marjorie Western.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara Bates, Eleanor Blum,
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan.
REPORTERS: Roy Alexander, John A. Babington, Ogden
G. Dwight, Paul J. Elliott, Courtney A. Evans, Ted R.
Evans, Bernard H. Fried, Thomas Groehn, Robert D.
Guthrie, Joseph L. Karpinski, Thomas H. Kleene, Rich-
ard E. Lorch, David G. Macdonald, Joel P. Newman,
Kenneth Parker, George I. Quimby, William R. Reed,
Robert S. Ruwitch, Robert J. St. Clair, Arthur S. Settle,
Marshall D. Silverman, A. B. Smith, Jr., Arthur M.
Taub Philip T. Van Zile.
WOMEN REPORTERS: Dorothy Gies, Jean Hanmer,
Florence Harper, Marie Hed, Eleanor Johnson, Jose-
phine McLean, Marjorie Morrison, Sally Place, Rosalie
Resnick, Mary Robinson, Jane Schneider, Margaret
Spencer.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER........... W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER............BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER......................
.............................. CATHARINE MC HENRY
i3EPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Fred Her-
trick; Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Contracts, Jack Bellamy; Advertising Service, Robert
Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuus; Circulation, Jack Ef-
roymson.
ASSISTANTS: Meigs Bartmess, Van Dunakin, Milton Kra-
mer, John Ogden, Bernard Rosenthal, Joe Rothbard,
James Scott, David Winkworth.
WOMEN'S BUSINESS STAFF
Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell, Winifred Bell, Mary Bursley,
Peggy Cady, Betty Chapman, Patricia -Daly, Jean Dur-
ham, Minna Giffen, Doris Gimmy, Billie Griffiths, Janet
Jackson, Isabelle Kanter, Louise Krause, Margaret
Mustard, Nina Pollock, Elizabeth J. Simonds.
NIGHT EDITOR: E. JEROME PETTIT
No Residence Rules
For Degree Students..
IN LAST week's poll there were 2,380
no's to 469 yeses on the question,
"Should the University have jurisdiction over resi-
dences of students with degrees?" Thus, by a
five to one majority the campus goes on record
as opposed to prying interference on the part of
the University in the personal matter of where
and how graduate students and students in the
professional schools shall live.
It would be difficult to understand how the vote
could go any other way. Practically every stu-
dent holding a degree has passed the stage in his
education devoted to the process for which many
adults claim the adjective "broadening" is euphe-
mistic. Graduate students and students in the
professional schools are here because they wish
to obtain specific information in a particular
field. They mean business. They are at least
four years older than when they enrolled as fresh-
men, and most of them have obtained their legal
majority. Why should the University limit them
in their choice of residence?
Many persons find it difficult to understand why
the University should have anything to say about
residence even of undergraduates. Numerous in-
stitutions of higher learning have achieved dis-
tinguished success by confining their activity sole-
ly to the purpose for which they were created, that
is to say, academic instruction. But leaving the
undergradtate angle out of the picture, why

should there be any interference with degree stu-
dents? Sentiment and reason unite to condemn
University regulation of the privacy of men and
wonen who take their business here seriously, and
who are deemed by law to be adults.
Dr. Ward's Presence
An Opportunity...
WE hear much of liberal and radical
thinking these days and it seems
as if it will have to be this sort of thinking which
will bring us out of the present economic muddle.
The striking thing is that so little of the advanced
thinking about it is being done by advocates of
religion. True, there are a few father Coughlins
and Reverend Fosdicks but they are not numer-
ous. This is a surprising circumstance when one
stops to consider that Jesus, the founder and
leader of a great religion, was himself a radical
thinker and was crucified for opposing the status
quo of his day. Today most of the liberal and
radical thinkers are not only outside the fold of
n m rPn uinA1iyion hut for the most part are even

At the Michigan
AT THE MICHIGAN
"FEMALE"

**

Allison Drake ...... Ruth Chatterton
Jim Thorne .......... George Brent
Cooper ........... John Mack Brown
Hariett .................Lois Wilson
If you like Ruth Chatteron, you will think this
picture is grand. It is the story of Allison Drake,
a very rich young lady who has inherited along
with her father's automobile business the ability
to run it. She accomplishes the impossible in
business daily, gives fantastic orders to her em-
ployees, invites them to dinner at night, and when
they make love to her, disposes of them the next
morning. Tired of being a target for hypocritical
flattery from money-seeking friends, she deserts
a party at her home and goes to a very cheap
district of town in search of somebody who will
like her for just her sweet self. Unfortunately
for her, she does, and the rest of the picture
shows her being miserable and plotting ways to
hook him.
The predominating theme of "Female' 'is lux-
ury. We see La Chatterton buzzing around in -
monstrous cars, being bathed in the morning,
massaged in the evening, pampered in general by
her barrage of maids, and stalking around a man-
sion so big and preposterous that it reeks of the
old silent movie days when no background was
stupendous enough to put a big star in. It is
mainly for this reason that "Female" falls short
of being a really good movie. But Chatterton ad-
mirers will like it and with good reason, because
she is given every good opportunity to exploit
herself, including her painfully good diction, and
the story is clever. George Brent does well as a
very hard-to-get engineer, and Lois Wilson and
John Mack Brown work hard to put themselves
over.
There are a Leon Errol comedy and a musical
short which are quite trying, but which both
have potentialities of being entertaining.
C. BC.
The Theatre
HIM AND MAE WEST
"Don't you worry," one of the stage hands
said to Robert Henderson just before the opening
of "Criminal-at-Large" on Sunday evening, "you
will have a good house tonight for your show.
The Mae West picture will be sold out, and you
will get the overflow.. ."
There was.no use of growing haughty, Hender-
son admitted in an interview back stage last night.
It was the truth. There was no combating Miss
West. In six months, possibly a year, she will be
out like a light. Just as she is through on the New
York stage, with Hollywood exploitation glaring
on her that even a Duse could not live up to, Mae
West is good for about three more pictures. Then
her "incomparable glamor" with her mannerisms,
repeated in their unvarying routine, will become
a deathly bore.
It gives one pause. Jane Cowl, Blanche Yurka,
Margaret Anglin, Violet Kemble-Cooper, Robert
Loraine - Henderson has brought Ann Arbor a
whole galaxy of the American theatre. Such a
record, such a standard of performances should
assure a company of a reasonably definite public.
But it is never true in Ann Arbor, perhaps never
true anywhere in the theatre. You have to show
them all over again each time. Henderson's au-
diences at the end of the week have become more
flattering for "Criminal-at-Large," but against
the unexpected competition of Mae West you
would have thought it an unknown tent show.
Audiences that have seen "Criminal-at-Large" all
seem to agree that it is one of the Festival's most
interesting performances. It is effective and ex-
citing. But not until "I'm No Angel" was out of
town!
it is all a wary game as uncertain as the wind,
whether in New York or Boston or Ann Arbor.
Several years ago Henderson presented a pro-
duction of the "Electra" that Burns Mantle called
the finest performance of heroic drama New York
had ever seen. "Electra" starved 'in Ann Arbor;
audiences found Blanche Yurka dull. and Martha
Graham "terrible." In New York for the same
production the audience stood on its feet and
cheered after every performance.
"Peter Ibbetson," Henderson believes, is one of
his finest, most characteristic productions. It is
to open the Boston Festival on Christmas night;
and it has always drawn capacity audiences. Yet
Ann Arbor found it sentimental and old-fashioned.

Last year, the same Ann Arbor audiences were
enchanted with "The Lady of the Camelias." But
they were tricked into liking Dumas' play, because
he preceeded it by two of the stiffest doses of
modernism he could find, "Springtime for Henry"
and "Design for Living." Without these two, "The
Lady of the Camelias" would never have suc-
rs~a d _ .

Henderson to bring his new production of "Mac-
beth" here during the winter. The spring Festival
is a long way off. Until then we shall have to
rely, for our big moments on Miss Mae West, the
Red Hot Mamma from Way Back.
Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disre-
garded. The names of communicants will, however,
be regarded as confidential upon request. Contribu-
tors are asked to be brief, confining themselves to
less than 300 words if possible.
To The Editor:
MORE ON CRITICISM
A propos your enlightening editorial on modern
criticism, I am indeed flattered to find myself the
source of inspiration to so omniscient a person-
age as a Daily editor. But at the same time it
grieves me to see this rare insipiration abused.
My criticism in Campus Opinion was not directed
at our government but at the reasoning with
which the ever conscientious Daily sought to
coach the campus voters by "proving" (these
quotes are also my own) that it is one's unde-
viating duty to support his country in any war
whatsoever. Since this reasoning is based upon
certain assumptions which are, in my opinion,
untenable, it follows that the resulting conclusions
should not be taken seriously. Hence my criti-
cism.
In regard to constructive criticisms, I believe
that any criticism which repudiates an illogical
or undesirable doctrine is ipso facto constructive.
Even tho it offers no satisfactory alternative, this
criticism at least tries to keep us from a disas-
trous one. And interfering with disaster is con-
structive.
Satisfed now?
Or can't The Daily "take it?"
Arthur Shapiro, '34
ACADEMIC CREDIT WOULD
RUIN SPIRIT OF THE BAND
To The Editor:
I quite agree with your editorial that the mem-
bers of the band ought to be rewarded for the
time and effort they expend in drilling and prac-
ticing the football season. But why give aca-
demic credit? From my experience I judge that the
"Fighting Spirit" is largely due to the fact that
the members of the organization are volunteering
their services. It is their willingness to work for
the fun of it that gives the band its pep and en-
ergy.
Suppose academic credit were given. This may
be a good reward for those already in the band,
but what would be the result as to the future?
With the inducement of credit there would be
found students going out for the band when they
would not under present cicumstances. The con-
clusion is inevitable that such persons would
dampen the spirit which is now so prevailing.
There would be the attitude "We are out for the
credit; incidently we do have some fun." The
primary purpose would be credit. This being so,
would there be a band willing to march approx-
imately four miles from the stadium in Columbus
Ohio to a downtown hotel, after a strenuous par-
ade during the football game, as was done in 1930,
and still cheerfully play "Yankee Doodle" one row
at a time as they marched; or march the same
distance (as they did one spring in Benton Har-
bor, Michigan) under a sun so hot, that the heat
of the pavement blistered your feet if you stood
too long in one spot. ..and after it was over,
still be able to smile? How many of these persons
would be able to stay out in the open some Sat-
urday afternoon and play in a downpour (Mich-
igan State game of 1931) or, play when lips got
chapped and fingers got numb from cold. Then
after the game, snake dance up State Street...
and all this without a grumble?
True, the members of the band work hard
but their willingness to work without the ex-
pectation of compensation is what makes that
"Fighting One Hundred." Reward them by giving
them more trips. The fun of these trips, the idea
of being a member of a fine organization, and the
cultural advantages of the music as rehearsed
after the football season, is all the reward they
ask. Let's not kill the spirit by making it another
course.
SEB.
II I

Collegiate Observer
By BUD BERNARD
A professor at Georgia Tech recently gave a
test to one of his classes to determine how ac-
curately a man's character and occupation may
be judged by seeing his picture. He used pictures
of Lewis Lawes, warden at Sing Sing; Sinclair
Lewis, novelist; Walter Lippmann, editorial writer;
and H. L. Mencken, critic and editor of the Amer-
ican Mercury. They were identified as follows:
L a w e s - banker, politican, statesman, doctor,
factory worker, and aviator. Lewis - carpenter,
murderer, explorer, gangster, radio announcer, in-
surance agent and astronomer. Lippmann -
lawyer, gangster, plumber, governor, preacher,
and musician. Mencken - Butcher, beer baron,
mill-worker, gambler, detective, traveling sales-
man, gangster, and bootlegger.
Such is fame -On Monday of last week a
young feminine reporter of the Minnesota
Daily obtained from unofficial sources a story
6n freshmen women painting their toenails.l
On Tuesday it appeared in the Daily. On
Wednesday the United Press sent it over a
network of 400 daily papers. And on Thurs-
day, Arthur Brisbane, known as the world's
highest salaried editorial writer, used it as
an item in his daily syndicated column, plac-
ing it between a story of Japanese finance
and comment on Aimee Semple McPherson's
powers - and here it is in this column.
The co-eds at the University of Oregon were
planning to make the Journalism Jam dance a
+nncmP.ralln and war noisy najamas. But the

Roget-THESAURUS OF ENGLISH WORDS AND PHRASES
Haggard - DEVILS, DRUGS AND DOCTORS
Menninger - THE HUMAN MIND
Van Loon -TOLERANCE

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