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November 18, 1933 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-11-18

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

E MICHIGAN DAILY
Established 1890.

.-

vote whether they want whiskey to be sold by the
glass in the their particular political subdivision.
This is not, of course, a perfect bill. It makes
no pretense of being one. But it-is a bill which
meets the problems raised by national prohibi-
tion repeal realistically. It is neither too wet nor
too dry. It tries to be temperate and sane. The
coming legislative debate will undoubtedly un-
cover some flaws in the bill, but in the main, it
appears to be one of the most sensible solutions to
the problem which has yet been advanced.
Th Tear

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tUCIWNGpWoW S NCV iS O$SV °|i cBan( arnwantpm IMeWym., u -PaA
Published every morning except Monday during the
Uiversity year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control. of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
tion a- i'the Big Ten News Service.
uoriatd alriat __rsg
- 1933 ( NATI.A - mve 1934
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-Gener*l.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by nail.
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $3.75; by
mail, $4.25.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 21214.
Represe.tatives: College Publications Representatives,
Inc., 40 Est Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylston Svree, Boston;r612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR.........THOMAS K,-CONNELLAN
CIT EDIT OR.............BRACKEY SHAW
EITORIAL DIR.ECTOR.............. HART SCHAAF
SPORTS EDITOR...............ALBERT H. NEWMAN
WOMElI'S EDITOR....................CAROL J. HANAN
NIGH'I EDITORS: A. Ellis Ball, Ralph G. Coulter, Wil-
1iam G. Ferris; John C. Healey, E. Jerome Pettit, George
Van Vleck, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Donald R. Bird,
Arthur W. Carstens, Sidney Frankel, Roland L. Martin,
Marjorie Western.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara Bates, Eleanor Blum,
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan.
REPOR''RS: Roy Alexander, John A. Babington, Ogden
G. Dwight, Pul J. Elliott, CourtneyA. Evans, Ted R.
Evans, Bernard H. Fried; Thomas Groehn, Robert D.
Guthrie, Joseph L. Karpinski Thomas H. Kleene, Rich-
ard E. Lorch, David G. Macdonald, Joel P. Newman,
Kenneth Parker, George I. Quimby, William R. Reed,
Robert S. uwith, Robert J. St. Clair, Arthur S. Settle,
Marshall D. Silverman, A. B. Smith, Jr., Arthur M.!!
Taub, Philip T. Van Zile.
WOMEN REPORTERS: Dorothy Gies, Jean Hamer,
Florence Harper, Marie Held, Eleanor Johnson, Jose-
phine McLean, Marjorie Morrison, Sally Place, Rosalie
Resnick, Mary Robinson, Jane Schneider, Margaret
Spencer.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUS NESS MANAGER .........W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER........ ..BERNARD E. SHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER......;... .
................... CATHARINE MC HENRY
iEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Fred Her-
trick; Cassified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Contracts, Jack Bellamy; Advertising Service, Robert
Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circulation, Jack Ef-
roymson.
ASSISTANTS: Meigs Bartmess, Van Dunakin, Milton Kra-
mer, John Ogden, Bernard Rosenthal, Joe Rothbard,
James Scott, David Winkworth.
WOMEN'S BUSINESS STAFF
Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell, Winifred Bell. Mary Bursley,
Peggy Cady, Betty Chapman, Patricia Daly, Jean Dur-
ham, Minna Giffen, Doris Gimmy, Billie Griffiths, Janet
Jackson, Isabelle Kanter, Louise Krause, Margaret
Mustard, Nina Pollock, Elizabeth J. Simonds.
NIGHT EDITOR: WILLIAM G. FERRIS
The Proposed Liquor
Control Bill. ..
T HE PROBLEM of liquor control, as
Prof. Robert Angell pointed out to
those attending the Union Forum Tuesday night,
has perplexed mankind down through many civ-
ilizations and many ages. It is not a problem
which can be solved in a few minutes thought;
and, no matter what solution the majority de-
cides upon, there will always be a protesting
minority. The problem simply cannot be solved
to the complete satisfaction of everyone.
These facts are known, and admitted, by the
members of the legislature sub-committee which
has been appointed to draft a liquor control bill for
Michigan after prohibition is formally repealed.
The bill which they have finally decided upon,
and which the chairman of the sub-committee,
Carl Delano, outlined Tuesday night, is a com-
promise measure. It attempts to be neither too
wet nor too dry. It tries to be an intelligent means
of providing liquor in a sensible manner, and is
based upon the following ideas:
First, the corruption caused by liquor in the
past has been not only because the use of exces-
sive alcohol was bad, but because the profit angle
of the business, which, through advertising, en-
couraged a great deal of. drinking, brought about
an unhealthy state .of competition. The bill plans
to remove this private profit element by havi'ng
all liquor either sold directly by the State, or, as
in the case of beer, by having its price regulated
by the State.
Second, the less alcoholic content a beverage
has the less likely it is to intoxicate those who

drink it. A great amount of beer, for instance,
must be drunk to give the effect a single glass of
whiskey might give, even though a greater amount
of alcohol may be contained in the beer. There-
fore, the natural thing to do is to make these
beverages of small alcoholic content available for
general consumption in the hope that their easy
procurance will do away with the desire for harder
liquors. To carry out this principle the State will
allow the sale of beverages up to 23 per cent by
volume (this may be modified to 16 per cent) to
take place in any establishment asking for a
license.
Third, hard liquors, drunk to any considerable
degree have a damaging effect upon the drinker.
The State will therefore sell these beverages only
through regulated State dispensaries, to be drunk
off premises.
Fourth, the bootlegger is one of the worst evils
which national prohibition has developed. He
can make and sell liquor cheaply. Therefore, in
n,"ls t+-;Im +he romnetitiennthe hootlegger might

AT THE;LYDIA MENDELSSOHN
"PLAYBOY OF THE WESTERN WORLD"
A REVIEW
By JOHN W. PRITCHARD
When John Millington Synge wrote his play,
he intended it as a burlesque upon Irish idio-
syncrasies in the first place, and ultimately upon
human nature at large. With flaws which, for
an amateur company, were comparatively minor,
the Detroit Laboratory Theatre last night pro-
duced the comedy exactly as written, from view-
points both of feeling and of technical intent,
save for the omission of a few lines which early
were labelled as "scorchers" and which were cut
from the play so soon after its first appearance
that they are now lost in antiquity. A great
deal of work has been expended upon this pro-
duction by the players; in fact, the company has
come almost to be associated with Synge and his
products. The results of their labor are gratify-
ing, on the whole, for the play is developed in
a fashion calculated to bring out the best of its
frothy -gleefulness.
On the occasion of the comedy's first presenta-
tion in the early years of this century's initial
decade, the actors were favored by various un-
savory missiles whose resounding impacts indi-
cated that all was not well in the audience's re-
action. It is to be feared that the Irish are
somewhat underdeveloped as regards thickness of
skin, for their failure to accept a broad jest turned
upon themselves is otherwise rather hard to un-
derstand. Mr. Synge has studied carefully the
oddities of the Irish, and he has satirised them
subtly by means of caricature.
The play last night was carefully produced,
and Edwin Grammercy evidently gave a good deal
of attention to the proper dramatization of it.
There were only two flaws noticeable in the di-
rection: in the first act, when two spotlights
upon a twilight scene fail to give quite sufficient
light, and in the last stanza, when a love scene
is performed upon a bench at the rear, partially
obscured by a table and chair.
Acting laurels must, of course, go to Mr. Gram-
mercy, as the playboy; his superior experience and
natural aptitude for a role of this type make the
decision somewhat obvious. The only person in
the cast who approached his finesse was Tom
Dougall, formerly of Comedy Club, who played
the craven Shawn Keough in most amusing fash-
ion.
The women in the cast, more's the pity, seemed
not to have grasped the idea at all. Their acting
chiefly consisted of conveying an impression that'
their heads were fixed to their shoulders by means
of springs; and the slightest movement set the
ill-adjusted crania bobbing like a ripe apple on
a branch of a windy September afternoon. May
Kilgour, whose Pegeen was one of the two impor-
tant female parts, opened the play discouragingly
enough by reading an unimportant letter as
though she were addressing an outdoor crowd of
many thousands without benefit of microphone;
thereafter she appeared to be concentrating the
bulk of her attention upon proper juggling of
her really excellent brogue. She sounded a false
note in her last line by producing a behemothian
sob a la Stan Laurel, when all that was called for
in the play is a sincere groan of despair. It is the
touch of plaintiveness that creeps into Irish com-
edy with great regularity, but she apparently
thought the line was funny, Elaine Newell, as the
Widow Quin, was annoyingly effervescent.
ELMER RICE
AND THE MODERN THEATRE
By KENNETH ROWE
At thr present moment, I would rather hear
Elmer Rice speak on "The Future of the The-
atre" than any other man I can think of. Elmer
Rice and Eugene O'Neill seem to me to be our
two most important contemporary American
dramatists. Of these two, Mr. Rice, as he stated
of himself in a recent publication, is one "whose
own minor success has been won entirely within
the precincts of what is called the commerical
theatre." (Anyone except Mr. Rice would, of
course, have used another word than "minor.")
For nearly twenty years, now, Mr. Rice has been
a successful dramatist, and in recent years a suc-
cessful producer as well. He knows both the Amer-
ican drama and the machinery of its public pre-
sentation. When he wrote a play that no one else
cared to undertake, with the experience and means
gained in the commercial theatre, he produced it
himself, and "Councilor-at-law" became not only

the outstanding hit of 1931-32 but was returned
for 120 performances the following season.
The success Mr. Rice has gained has been no
matter of mere conformity. Working from within
he has taken the theatre unawares,, as it were, and
lifted.it beyond itself. In "The Adding Machine"
he created one of the earliest and still one of the
best purely expressionistic and radically experi-
mental dramas; in "Street Scene," a Pulitzer play,
he set a new mode, the weaving together of in-
dividual dramas in a cross-section of a crowded
and impersonal background, which has since be-
come one of the most characteristic dramatic ex-
pressions of our age "Grand Hotel," Galsworthy's
"The Roof," "Dinner at Eight," for example).
"Councilor-at-law" was one of the most daring
productions of recent years, and I believe, not only
Mr. Rice's greatest play to date, but one of the
most profound character studies in modern drama.
These plays, and others by Mr. Rice, have not
only expanded the scope of our theatre in form
and thought, but have vitalized it with intimately
American background. Lennox Robinson, in the
w'-,N- ,_ i~im _ Arnm+ a riP "W rm.

Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disre-
garded. The names of communicants will, however,
be regarded as confidential upon request. Contribu-
tors are asked to be brief, confining themselves to
less than 300 words if possible.
SPORTSMANSHIP
TODAY
To The Editor:
The test of sportsmanship in a school, college,
or university applies not only to the men on the
team, but also to the students representing the
institution together with the spectators in the
stands.
It is very easy to overlook a breach of ethics on
the part of an athlete who is keyed to a high
pitch of excitement in the heat of the game, but
what plea is there, beyond that of ignorance, for
the spectator who commits unsportsmanlike acts
in the stands. And ignorance excuses no one.
The throwing of snowballs onto the field of
play and the remarks to the officials in last Sat-
urday's game may be mentioned as part of the
unsportsmanship of the spectators.
The following may be noted as some of the
things that are not done in the best university
circles.
First, addressing uncomplimentary remarks to
the officials. Seldom are these remarks heard
by the officials in question, and are more often
intended as witticisms by the perpetrator. Usually
the institution which harbors these persons ac-
quires a reputation for cheap sportsmanship not
only by some of the spectators but also by the
visiting team officials and rooters of that par-
ticular university which that team is represent-
ing.
Second, criticizing the players of either team.
As a general rule these criticisms are made by
players who do not know enough about the game
that is being played and have no game appre-
ciation. Yet they feel free to criticize the men
who have won by hard work their positions on the
team, and these criticisms are levelled against the
players on the visiting teams and are intended
to be derisive.
A cheap show invites and expects insulting re-
marks on the part of the audience, while at a
Grand Opera such remarks would be entirely out
of place and the perpetrators would be instantly
ejected.
Third, alibis over defeat and gloating over a
victory are not in keeping with the Michigan
Spirit. And Michigan prides itself on the quality
of its sportsmanship when subjected to the most
crucial tests, as demonstrated by the Michigan
team this season.
Let us have improved sportsmanship in the
stands today for therein lies the essence of all
that is big and worthwhile in this, one of the
best educational institutions in America.
John Johnstone,
Tennis and Fencing Coach.
--.
Collegiate Observer
By BUD BERNARD
Love of a good joke led a professor at Marshall
College to direct each member of his English
class to write on a slip of paper the name of a
hoary bespectacled gentleman in the portrait
above his desk and to hand it in. The results jus-
tified the trick. One student admitted that he
didn't know who the man was, the others guessed,
but none gave the right answer. All kinds of
answers came in, from Mae West to Santa Claus
and included such celebrities as John Keats,
Longfellow, Bernard Shaw, Flo Ziegfield, and
many others. At last, in order to solve the
puzzling mystery, a student asked the professor
whose the picture was. The professor didn't know.
Attractive co-eds often turn out badly, says
a judge; the unattractive ones, on the other
hand, are badly turned out.
Cuts are allowed at Michigan State College from
3 p. m. on the day of a formal dance till noon of
the following day.

FROM OUR CONTEMPORARIES
Oh listen to the death knell sound,
Prohibition rang the gong,
And now our troubles may be drowned
With women,' wine, and song.
Hic, Hic, Hurray!
- The Oklahoma Daily -
Add these to your list of definitions: A co-
ed is a girl who is old enough to get into her
own jams - A text.is a book used as a stand-
ard by those taking any given course. Prac-
tically always written by the person who
teaches the course. Sometimes read.
And add these to your list of similies: Her
hair was so red she used lipstick for eyebrow
pencil - As pretty as garters on a windy day
-As low as a worm in a submarine.
-Collegiate Daily -
Mid-year- examinations at Boston University
were very revealing. A few of the answers were:
"Theodore Drieser is a probable candidate for
president, and is that author of 'Main Street'."
"In 1658 the Pilgrims crossed the Atlantic Ocean.
This is known as Pilgrim's Progress." "The death
of Socrates was caused by an overdose of wed-
lock."
The Southwest College Daily reports seven
"Do Mores" for college students to follow.
They are:

ROAST
TURKEY
from an ELECTRIC OVEN

MICHIGAN
DAILY
CLASSIFIED
ADS
GET
RE SULTS

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READ THE DAILY CLASSIFIED ADS

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RelIigious Activitiles

First Methodist
Episcopal Church
A COMMUNITY CATHEDRAL
State and washington
Ministers
Frederick B. Fisher
Peter F. Stair
10:45-Morning Worsip.
"Finding Your Own
Religious Experience"
7:30 - Evening Worship.
"THE PLACE OF FAITH IN
AN AGE OF SCIENCE"
Dr. Fisher preaching at both
services
STALKER HALL
(For Students)
12:15- Half-hour forum.
3:00 -International Student
Group.
6:00 - Student-led devotional
service.

DO NOT
N EGLECT
YOUR
RELIGIOUS
ACTIVITIES

Zion Lutheran
Church
Washington St. at 5th Ave.
E. C. Stelihorn, Pastor
9:00 a.m.-Bible School. Lesson topic:
"PAUL AT ATHENS"
9:00 a.m.-Harvest Festival Ser-
mon in German Lan-
guage.
10:30 A.M. -Service with sermon on
"A Man's Worth -What
He Is, Not What He Has."
5:30 p.m. - Student Fellowship
and Supper.
6:45 p.m. - "The Christian Stu-
dent Tomorrow.' An
address by Dr. Ed-
ward Blakeman.

St. Paul's Lutheran
(Missouri Synod)
West Liberty and Third Sts.
November 12
9:30 A.M. -Service in German.
9:30 A.M. -Sunday Scnool and Bible
Class.
10:45 A.M. - Service in English.

The Fellowship of
Liberal Religion
(Unitarian)
State and Huron Streets
Sunday Morning at 10:45
"Revolutions in Morals"

St. And rews
Episcopal Church
Divisionat Catherine Street
Services of Worship
Sunday, November 19, 193°
8:00 A.M. - Holy Communion
9:30 A.M. - Church School
11:00 A.M. -Kindergarten
11:00 a. in. -Morning Prayer and
Sermion.

1.
2.
3.

9o
Do
Do

more than exist, live.
more than touch, feel.
more than read, absorb.

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