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November 15, 1933 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-11-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

IGAN DAILY
ished 1890

A-

r

--y-tis ,
" )'" i

Published every morning eicept Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editrial Associa-
tiob a' the Big Ten News Service.
soctiited 6,o011e ate ,reis
;F 933 in o~p aveR X934
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
ecrid class matter. Special raeof postage granted by
Thir Assistant Postmaster-Generl.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail.
$150. During regular school year by carrier, $3.75; by
mail, $425.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michiga, Phone: 2-1214.
Represer'tatives: College Publications Representatives,
Inc., 40 East Thirty--Fourth Street, New York (ity; 0
Boylston Sureet, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANACiNG EDITOR.......THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
EDITOR.IAL DIRECTOR..... " .....C.RAT HA F'
CITY EDITOR......................BRACKLEY SHAW
SPORTS EDITOR...:............ALBRT H. NEWMAN.
WOMEI'S EDITOR................CAROL J. HANAN
NIGHI EDITORS: A. Ellis Ball, Ralph G. Coulter, Wi-
"am G. Ferris, John C. Healey, E. Jerome Pettit, George
Van Veck, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
0P0RTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Donald R. Bird,
Arthur W. Carstens, Sidney Frankel, Roland L. Martin,
Marjorle Western.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara Bates, Eleanor Blum,
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan.
REPORTERS: Roy Alexander, John A. Babington, Ogden
G. Dwight, Paul J. Elliott. Courtney A. Evans, Ted R.
Evans, Bernard 'H:Pried, Thomas Groehn, Robert D.
Guthrie Joseph L. Karpinski, Thomas H.Kleene, Rich-.
ard E. Lorch, DaVid G. Macdonald, Joel P. Newman,
Klenneth Parker, eore I. Quimby, William R. Reed,
Robert S. Ruwitch, Robert J St. Clar,Arthur S. Settle,
Marshall D. Silverman, A. B. Smith, Jr., Arthur M.'
Taub, Philip ''. Van Zile.
WOMEN REPORTERS: Dorothy Gies, Jean Hanmer,
Florece Harper, Marie Hed, Eleanor Johnson, Jse-
phine McLean, Marjorie Morrison, Sally Place, Rosalie
Resnick, Mary Robinson, Jane Schneider, Margaret
Spencer.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER ........... W. GRAFTON SHARP,
CREDIT MANAGER...........BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS ANAGER..., ......
................ ............ CATHARINE MC HENRY
Z)EPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Fred Her-
trick; Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Contracts, Jack Bellamy; Advertising Service, Robert
Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circulatio, Jack Ef-
roymson.
ASSISTANTS: Meigs Bartmess, Van Dunakin, Milton Kra-
mer, John Ogden, Bernard Rosenthal, Joe Rothbard,
James Scott, David Winkworth.,
WOMEN'S BUSINESS STAFF
Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell, Winifred Bell, Mary Bursley,
Peggy Cady, Betty Chapman,.Patrici Daly, Jean Dur-
ham, Minna Giffen, Doris Gimmy, Billie Griffiths, Janet
Jackson, Isabelle Kanter, Louise Krause, Margaret
Mustard, Nina Pollock, Elizabeth J. Simonds.
NIGHT EDITOR: GEORGE VAN VLECK
New. Directorate Ofl
Student, Alumni Relations
A S might be expected, the newly cre-
ated office of Director of Student1
and Alumni Relations is receiving much and var-l
led criticism. Study of the criticisms reveal that
they have just one thing in common -they pro-t
ceed from a misconception of the functions and
jurisdictions of the new office.
The criticism we heard yesterday, naturally, had
to do mostly with the student aspect of the new7
office. The tenor of the criticism was that there7
is no need for the new directorate, and that its1
establishment is just one more step in the direc-
tion of paternalism. Why should extra-curriculari
activities be co-ordinated, it was asked. HowI
can they be co-ordinted? Won't the whole re-7
cult of the planbejust .one,, more blak to fill
out, one more office to keep in touch with? Isn't1
this more paternalism.)
Now a study of the student relations of the1
new office leads to the conclusion that these ques-1
tions are in the wrong direction. For the essen-
tial part of the new Director's student work will
be the composition of student problems as they
arise, and not the establishment and enforcement
of new regulations.
That there is a place for the office is easily
shown. The proof proceeds from the fact that all'
jurisdictions of students and of boards relating
to students center in the president. . He is the
person,and' the only person, who can resolve prob-
lems arising from conflicting views, say, of the
faculty board that passes on proposed Comedy
Club plays and the board in control of the League
and the Lydia Mendelssohn theatre. A satisfac-

tory solution of such problems, which constantly
arise, almost always necessitates an attentive
hearing of the pleas of the parties involved. This
takes time. .The president of the University
cannot be'-expected to have the time, Hence the
new office.
President Ruthven, incidentally, does not in-
tend to make himself inaccessible. He will retain
authority in all matters and will himself hear
the cases that Professor Anderson will not be
able to settle. The new office will merely pro-
vide for fairer, more leisurely hearings, and for
a greater clarification of issues.
Thus it will fulfill a real need
And incidentally a better man than Professor
Anderson could not have been picked for the
new position. No student who has had occasion
to kiow him will fail to applaud the choice, and
alumni -acquaintances will rejoice to learn that a
man with his sympathetic grasp of their problems
has been named the first director of an office
which will also affect them.

of the most interested parties in the controversy
a chance to express its feelings.
State Street merchants want to sell beer. Their
desire is based on the premise that the students
want to buy beer. If the student body does want
to have beer available for public consumption in
the campus area, it should say so now definitely.
This is the time to let your pent-up feelings take
effect.
In addition to the student vote, the faculty will
be given the opportunity to express its views
on east side beer. It has been one of the con-
tentions of the council drys that it is this group
which does not want beer. We have talked to
men on the faculty and we believe that the rank
and file of the teaching group on campusis for
the sale of beer.
Whether you are wet or dry, whether you are
a student or a member of the faculty, you should
vote on the beer question Friday. This will be
the first popular test of the issue.
Musica Events
TWILIGHT ORGAN
RECITAL
Choral Prelude on "Ein Feste Burg".. . . Hanff
Sonata 333 ................ .......Quant
Arioso
Presto
Fugue in G-minor (the lesser) ........Bach
SuiteOp. 14 Magaeingreau
Pensee d' Automne......... . ...;..Jongen
Hora Mystica ........................Bossi
Heroic Suite .......................Rowley
Mood Fantasy
Triumph Song
T HIS month marks the 450th anniversary of the
birth of Martin Luther, to whom the World is
indebted for the great hymn of the Protestant
Church, Ein Feste Burg (A Mighty Fortress is
Our God.). Johann Haniff, an important German
organist prior to Bach, set a group of chorale pre-
ludes, among which Ein Feste Burg is outstand-
ing.
Quantz earned his reputation as flutist in the
court of Frederick the Great, and as a composer
of hundreds of flute pieces for the king. The
Bach Fugue, tuneful and spontaneous, is known
as "the lesser," to distinguish it from the Fugue
which adjoins the Fantasia in G-minor.
The modern element is well represented in this
program. The important position is given to an
imaginative work of Paul de Mailengreau. Avoid-
ing the extremities of modernistic tendencies, he
writes with admirable freedom. He has absorbed
from Franck his sense of devotion and spirituality,
and from Bach his artistic integrity. Better
known in England and France, his works are gain-
ing recognition as having something to say and
saying it well.
S.P.
THE KREISLER
CONCERT
To the Editor:
I have a strong feeling (and I know others who
share it) that Miss Place's recent review of the
Kreisler concert should not go unchallenged. It,
seems only fair that the Daily should give space
to an answer to a few of her rather wild state-
ments.
(1) Miss Place wrote: "For those who have
heard Kreisler before, there was some disappoint-
ment in the program." This statement is an exag-
geration, to say the least. Here is one who has
heard Kreisler before who suffered no disapoint-
ment, and there were plenty of others. It would
have been much better had she written: "To some
of us who heard Kreisler before...."
(2) Again "It is to be remarked that whatever
hurry and stiffness there was in his performance,
was forced by the unbending accompaniment..."
Is is not rather remarkable to suppose that, first,
Kreisler has been unable, in 20 years or so, to
train Mr. Lamson (!) to follow rather than to lead
him; second, that a great violinist like Kreisler
should hurry and stiffen his playing in order to
follow the accompaniment; and third, that if Mr.
Kreisler had found himself tied down all -these
years by the inexorable pace of:Mr.Lamson, that,
he did not get himself another accompanist? Suf-
flee it to say that to many of us the accompani-
ment seemed inimitable, following Mr. Kreisler's

playing with marvelous skill and perfection, even
in the most difficult parts; playing fast or slow as
the violin was played even when the tempo
varied from measure to measure, so that the two
were as one.
(3) And finally, "It is felt that Mr. Lamson
might have been a little less anxious to acknowl-
edge the applause directed in the main to Kreis-
ler." This statement is simply absurd. The pro-
gram clearly marked the first number on the pro-
gram as "Sonata, C minor, For violin and piano."
This sonata was the only part of the program for
which Mr. Lamson took any applause, and he did
this most modesty, always following Kreisler, and
staying as much in the background 'as possible.
Mr. Lamson is a first class pianist in his own
right, and an incomparable accompanist. The last
statement is an expression of opinion. But that
convention called for Mr. Lamson's bowing after
the Sonata for violin and piano, is a fact. And
that he was modest about it will, I think, be at-
tested by plenty of witnesses.
G. A. Cook, Grad.
The Theatre
A COUPLE OF QUICK ONES'
Notes On Henderson
Fall Festival
By GEORGE SPELVIN
Two Broadway hits are in town this week and
next, rushed in between engagements by Robert
Henderson.
That Mr. Henderson sees fit to revisit these
familiar shores with two of his most successful

interestingly with the Kaufman-Ferber work and
complete a well-rounded, if fleeting, festival.
Dinner At Eight
It is The Daily's custom to put two critics on
Mr. Henderson's trail when he comes to town,
and the present article may be considered as a
second review of the current "Dinner At Eight."
That the play is a fine job of writing, filled with
fat acting parts, and that its abrupt ending is
wierd and withal stimulating, needs no recapitu-
lation. The Henderson production itself shall be
our subject. To horse, men.
With intelligent use of the unit-set scheme,
Paul Stephenson has given the play a brilliant
mounting. Kitty Packard's boudoir and the Jor-
dan home stand out among the succession of
striking settings. The gowns are bright and ex-
treme. In fact, Mr. Henderson's familiar pen-
chant for a splurge of color makes "Dinner At
Eight" lively and frequently beautiful.
Helen Hughes as Kitty Packard, complete with
all the witchery, so to speak, and Miss Ring as
the flamboyant old actress, are undoubtedly the
stars of the show; and Amy Loomis stands out
among the small parts by far.
Since the days of Mrs. Malaprop, boisterous old
ladies of the Carlotta Vance type have been amus-
ing, appealing, and lovable. Miss Ring has all the
tricks of the veteran character actress and then
some more. It is worth the price of admission
(plus tax) to hear her swear about the customs
official who objected to her six fur coats. It is
beautiful; it is lyrical.
Helen Hughes works harder than any other
member of the cast to get humor into every line
of the play's best part.
Noel Tearle is good in his delineation of the
moribund movie shiek's pitiful pride, and suffi-
ciently convincing in his love scenes wth Miss
Paige, but his Demon Rum sequence is badly
over-staggered. Thelma Paige is also disappoint-
ing to some extent; her interpretation of one of
the best parts is weak and rather pointless.
Robert Henderson and Ainsworth Arnold for-
get the distinctive personalities which have be-
come familiar to Ann Arbor audiences, and turn
in two genuinely different and real characteriza-
tions. They lose themselves in the parts, and
both of them are better than we have seen them
for a year at least. Francis Compton gives a fine,
sensitive portrayal of the doctor who is torn be-
tween love and sex. (The distinction between the
terms belongs to the authors).
Prejudices
We liked especially-Amy Loomis' sigh of relief
after she has made Gustave an hohest man ...
Edith Gresham's approaching insanity over a
ruined dinner party ... . Alan Handley's accent
Bertha Forman's worry over her lobster
aspic. .. . Arthur Davidson's spectacles .
We Are Afraid We Didn't Like So Much -The
hotel manager who wanted to garner a laugh out
of a death scene.... The unfortunate prominence
of Larry Renault's dummy mirror. . . .
Conclusion
"Dinner At Eight" is a grand show - but if a
critic ever ended his review the way "Dinner At
Eight" ends, the editor would tell him to go right
straight to
(Curtain)
Collegiate Observer
By BUD BERNARD
Recommended for the meanest man in the
world: A professor at Syracuse University
who, while recovering from an appendicitis
operation, gave lectures in bed to his chem-
istry class with the aid of a microphone, tele-
phone exchange, and loud speaker.
* * *I
Under the glaring caption,"PARK WOMEN
ALLOWED TWO LATE DATES WEEKLY BY
NEW SOCIAL RULES, one of the largest head-
lines in the Park College Stylus, a story reveals
the dean of women's liberal decision that young
women of the college may stay out until 10
o'clock on Monday and Saturday..
Other nights of the week are to be closed nights.
The dean explains her radical action by saying,
"The whole purpose of college rules is to protect
rather than to prohibit."
a: s

The University of Alabama student pub-
lication describes the evolution of a college
man as follows
Freshman: Embarrassed silence.
Sophomore: I don't know.
Junior: I'm not prepared.
Senior: I don't like to venture an
opinion until I know more about
the subject.
S* * *
Students in the optometry department at Ohio
State University were about to get one of their
first real opportunities at practical optics. A vi-d
tim was selected by the faculty and the students
were to examine the patient's eyes to determine
what kind of glasses were needed, if any.
The optometrists-to-be were anxious to do a
good job. They hustled and they bustled about
in good order. Finally the individual tests were
completed and the students retired, each one to
submit his conclusions as to the tests.
The results were varied: some suggested glasses,
others declared the sight perfect, all were strong
in their convictions.
Not one student discovered that one of the
eyes of the patient was of glass.
- * * *
A professor of German at the University of
Colorado has been taken with diphtheria and 55
students in her classes have been given a three
day quarantine.
Again the University of Colorado has been
enforcing the rule that students caught drink-
ing are forced to attend Sunday School for
.4,,A 'Aof thrvears We wondeur what they

"Minnesota

Is A

~1

But A/

. ou gh Team
Iichigan Can Be
Tougher"~
HAVE TO BE IN CHAMPIONSHIP
T THESE POWERFUL RIVALS. THE
... WHETHER OR NOT THEY ARE
lIP FORM WILL DEPEND ON OUR

*A'

MICHIGAN WILL
FORM TO DEFEA
TEAM IS GOOD
IN CHAMPIONSH

III

SUPPORT.

I

THE TEAM WILL BE IN PERSON AT THIS GIANT
PEP MEETING AT HILL AUDITORIUM FRIDAY NIGHT

TO RECEIVE

DEFINITE PROOF

OF OUR SUPPORT,

LET'S NOT DISAPPOINT THEM.

Attend This Meeting

--- --
, . j

It turned out to be

what the campus
. . . a
d
r
k -a
a
t

was

looking for

modern magazine to meet a modern
Jemand. This year's fnew GARGOYLE
epresented not only a complete change
n Michigan's humor sheet - it marked
revolution in the entire field of college
magazines. Michigan students, tiring
)f the old slapstick type of publication,
made this change imperative, demand-
ed it. Their reception of the first issue,
(exceeding the former circulation by
ive hundred per cent), proved how
thoroughly they approved their new
magazine.
another issue !

,,,, r,.i ..

. .*

And now

THE NOVE MBER

1 -10001. - dMWN- - -MM

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