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November 14, 1933 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-11-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

MER14,1933 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Day Off1 Drill

Today

For Crucial

Gan

Regeczi Crashes Through Iowa's Line For 2

Yards

Phi Kappa Psi Is
X-Country Vict
Phi Kappa Psi won the ann
fraternity cross country meet :
terday, which was run over a two
one-half mile course. Brelsford
member of the winning team, an
freshman in the University, sr
tered the old fraternity two and 4
half mile record of 14:52, by bre
ing the tape first in the good 1
of 13:53.
Following is a list of the fratei
squads in the order in which
finished: Phi Kappa Psi, Brels
(1), Ellerby (3), Fisher (4); T
Xi, Simons (2), Thorn (6), Gerk
neyer (9); Theta Chi, J. Witmer
B. Witmer (8), Balmer (15);
Kappa, Waslielewski (5), Trar
tana (14), Gordon (16); Alpha K
pa Lambda, Stow (10), Morris
Cook (12).

IT WAS A NICE EXHIBITION of
football Saturday, not to men-
tion about fifty snowball fights, the
two miniature drum-majors, the po-
lice, and the pre-game exhibition of
snow clearing.
Maybe you want to know who lost
the game. It wasn't Iowa; it was the
Board in Control of Athletics. Here
was a perfectly good football game
between the conference leader and
a strong contender, and a paltry
twenty-six thousand were in attend-
ance. Why, with a set-up like that
the Board should have been able to
pay at least the first installment on
next year's footballs.
And here they are cheated out of
a good gate by a series of snow-
storms, hailstorms, rainstorms, and
sleetstorms; it's enough to give the
Board brainstorms. And then of
course there were at least fifty thou-
sand potential spectators who would
have come to the game if they had
felt that they could consume their
liquor while the game was in prog-
ress. But of course, nobody who
wanted to drink came to the contest
for fear of offending the Board.
I still think that Mike's proposal
about the hiring of a fleet of St. Ber-
nard dogs complete with brandy-kegs
as standard equipment would help in
rescuing the boys way over there
across the field on bronchitis slope
and would do a great deal to increase
gate receipts. Well, anyway, the sher-
iff and his boys all dressed in blue
would no doubt run into considerable
difficulty if it ever came to the point
of attaching the stadium and bring-
ing it back to the office.
T THESE football exhibitions, the
stadium, like all Gaul, is divided
into three parts . . . the, bond-hold-
ers, the flask-holders and the hand-
holders.
If you extended the fifty yard line
up into the stands with mathematical
precision, you would find al the
bond-holders seated right on it. You
may know the bond-holder because
he looks over the crowd with a crit-
ical eye and scarcely ever looks at
the game because he is so busy tell-
ing a business associate or friend wife
about the point-a-minute teams and
how Germany Schultz once spoke to
him (even if it were only to tell him
to get out of the way) that he has
no time to look at the game. Each
bond-holder holds his bond tightly
clutched in the left hand.
The flask-holder is usually so
happy about everything that he is
oblivious to the fact that he is just
one of those people who make the
Board Members lie awake nights and
worry about when the Federal au-
thorities are going to padlock the
stadium. You will find him in a va-
riety of positions, largely in a wide
variation from the vertical and some-
times completely horizontal.
There is not much to be said about
the hand-holder. Members of this
group are usually little blotches of
blanket without form or void to be
found. scattered throughout the
length, height, and breadth of the
stands. There is on record an in-
stance of one game in which a mem-
ber of this class emitted a feeble
cheer, but it is still unverified and
that was long ago.'
There are also about five students
(oh, frightfully Rah-Rah fellows)
who actually yell for one of the finest
teams Michigan ever had . . .
FROSH GAME THURSDAY
The annual grid contest between
the freshman and Phys. Ed.
squads planned to have been
played this afternoon will be
played Thursday afternoon on
Ferry Field. The game will begin
at 4p. m.

--Associated Press Photo

-Associated Press Photo
Frank "Butch" Larson, one of the
best ends in the Big Ten will be a
serious threat to the Wolverines here
Saturday. He can snare passes and
get down under punts with alarming
ability.
WO0MEIN'S
SPORTS
ALL-STATE STARS
Seven members of the Ann Arbor
Hockey Club have been chosen on
the first and second All-State hockey
teams; three on the first, and four
on the second squad. Ann Zauer,
Jane Eaton, and Virginia Peasely are
the stars, and Ann Zauer will cap-
tain the squad. On second squad are
Katharine Locke, Ruth Carstens,
Jeannette Sauerborne, and Marie
Hartwig represent the Ann Arbor
delegation. Marie Hartwig will lead;
the second eleven.
These teams will play against the
All-University teams Friday after-
noon, in preparation for the Great
Lakes Tournament, play-offs for
which begin Saturday morning.
GREAT LAKES TOURNEY
Teams from all over this sectionof
the Middle-West are entered in the
Great Lakes competition. This tour-
nament is the last elimination series
before the national play-offs, sched-
uled for the week-end of Thanksgiv-
ing. Two teams will represent Chi-
cago, two are entered from Cleveland,
two from Wetomacheka, and two
from Michigan.

Trainer Roberts said definitely
that Whitey Wistert will be ready to
start Saturday. The giant tackle in-
jured his neck while tackling Crayne
last week and had to be removed
from the game, but Roberts said the
injury was not serious.
Roberts also said that Carl Savage,
veteran guard hurt in the Illinois
game would be
ready to starto
against Northwest-
ern in next week's
game. What doc-
tors thought first.
was a fracture in
his foot has turned
out to be only a
bad sprain, the
fracture showing
up on the X-ray
plates being an old
one that is entirely
healed. Savage, himself, protests that
he will be ready to go back to his old
post against Minnesota, but Kipke
will take no chances on using him
prematurely.
Members of the coaching staff also
relaxed yesterday for the first time
in weeks.
Kipke went out duck hunting. The
amateur nimrod wanted to go deer
hunting this Fall but will have to be
content with haunches sent down by
kind friends. Meanwhile he's supply-
ing the larder with fresh mallards.
Cappy Cappon couldn't stay away
from the field house but spent the
afternoon playing checkers against
all comers.

Crayne is shown effectively stopping Michigan's advance before he
was seriously hurt in the game Saturday. Everhardus is in the right
background and Ward looks on from the extreme left.

Gphers' opes
For Title Grow
As Game Nears
Out in Minneapolis they're begin-+
ning to wonder who can stop the
big Wolverine machine. That is, all
but Bernie Bierman, the Gopher{
coach. And good reason he has for
his optimism too.
While Michigan was having a time
defending her string of twenty vic-
tories against the Hawkeyes, Minne-
sota had a day of rest and a couple
of scouters in Ann Arbor getting
more dope on Michigan plays. There-
fore Bierman has a pretty good idea
of what the Wolverines have to offer,
and also has some unused, unscouted
plays to work on this week.
The Gophers have an even chance
to at least tie for the Conference title
by whipping Michigan. If either Illi-
nois or Iowa should trip Purdue in
her remaining games, and Minnesota
should take Michigan, there is no
denying that the Gohpers would have
the title in the bag.
The Little Brown Jug enters the
scene again this Saturday, but the
fact of a win over the defending
champions means more to the North-
men than a paltry jug. The jug, how-
ever, has been in Michigan's lock-
box since 1929, when the Wolverines
won 7 to 6.
The threats of the powerful Min-
nesota eleven are mainly Pug Lund,
a sensational junior back, and, a
sophomore passing threat, Alphonse,
who has displaced Proffitt, a 1932
regular. Bierman is specializing in
sophomores this year, with six on
his first team, and he is having re-
markable success so far.

Upsets From Coast
To Coast Provide
Thrills For Fans
The West coast was the scene of
one of the biggest football upsets of
last week end when Southern Cali-
fornia's string of 28 games without
defeat was ended by Stanford, 13 to
7. Oregon remained undefeated by
winning over Oregon State 13 to 3,
and needs only a victory over the
Trojans to win the Pacific Coast
Championship and the Rose Bowl
bid.
In the East, Pitt shattered Du-
quesne's unbroken record with a 7
to 0 victory. Columbia's 14 to 7 win
over Navy was something of a sur-
prise.
Ramblers Take It
The Boilermakers of Purdue did
the thing they're all doing by taking
the Notre Dame Ramblers down the
line to the tune of a 19 to 0 score.
Illinois proved that her performance
against Michigan was not just a flash
in the pan by beating Northwestern
3 to 0 with a kick by Dave Cook.
Defeat of both the leading Arkan-
sas and second place Texas Long-
horns by Rice and Baylor left the
Southwest Conference race in con-
fusion and retained for all seven
members a slight chance at the title.
Coining nearer home, the Michigan
State Spartans came through with a
moral victory in the form of a 0 to 0
tie with the highly-touted Carnegie
Tech eleven.
GOOD CLOT H ES
DO THEIR PART,
TOO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

for

AN OFFICIAL RECORD
OF CAMPUS ACTIVITY

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BASKETBALL
Coach Ray Fisher has issued a
call for all freshmen interested in
freshman basketball to report to
him tonight at 7:30 in Waterman
Gymnasium, with their own equip-
ment.
U. Of M. In Return Meet
With Hurons In X-Country
The Michigan cross-country team
will meet Michigan Normal in a re-
turn race here Wednesday afternoon.
The three and one-half mile run will
start and finish at Ferry Field and
will start at 4 o'clock.

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