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November 12, 1933 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-11-12

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

CHIGAN
Establlshed 890

DAILY

'Ensian offices, or at the Dey or Rentschler or

-lI

ti.. t'

.%'

Spedding studio, for a :coupon. It will cost three
dollars. Then get an appointment, have your sit-
ting, and the job will be done. The coupon will
cover all expenses (And incidentally, if you care
to have some pictures finished, two of the three
dollars you have already payed will be applied on
whatever you choose to purchase.)
The important part is to get. the thing done
soon - this week will be. better than next. Pic-
tures now will mean an early-May 'Ensian.
Campus Opiion

r
Y

- tI
ng except Monday during the
nmer Session by the Board in
cations.
,n Conference Editorial Associa-
ws Service.
OtiPleiat rt';$
^ evace 93 .

ED PRESS
entitled to the use
s credited to it or
and the 'local news
Plication of special

tts

tere a fide Post fece at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
Ten r cla tesrs t t _Special rata of postage granted by
Thrzssistant Postnster-Geners.
Subscription during ummer by carrier, $1.00; by mail.
$ Dring regular school year by carrier, $3.75; by
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
1An Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2.1214.
Represeitatives: Collge Publications Repreentatives
Inlc., 40 Est Thirty-ourth 'Street, New York City; 80
Boylston Sreet, Boston;r612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING DITOR.........THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR........C. HART SCHAAF
CITY EDITOR........ ....... BRACKLEY SHAW
SPORTS EDITOR...............ALBERT H. NEWMAN
WOME'S EDITOR...... .......CAROL J. HANAN
NIGH'I EDITORS: A. Ellis Ball, Ralph G. Coulter, Wi-
dam 0G.Ferris, John C. Healey, E. Jerome Pettit, George
.Van Vieck, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Donald R. Bird,
Arthur W. Carstens, Sidney Frankel, Roland L. Martin,
Marjorie Western.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara Bates, Eleanor Blum,
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan.
REPORTERS: Roy Alexander, John A. Babington, Ogden
G. Dwight, Paul J. Elliott, Courtney A. Evans, Ted R.
Evans, -Bernard H. ried, Thomas Groehn, Robert D.
Guthrie, Joseph L. Karpinski, Thomas H. Kleene, Rich-
ard E. Lorch, David G. Macdonald, Joel P. Newman,
Kenneth Parker, George I. Quimby, William R. Reed,
Robert S. Ruwitch, Robert J. St. Clair, Arthur S. Settle,
Marshall D. Silverman, A. B. Smith, Jr, Arthur M.
Taub, Philip T. Van Zile.
WOMEN REPORTERS: Dorothy Ges, Jean Hanmer,
Florence Harper, Marie Held, Eleanor Johnson, Jose-
phine McLean, Marjorie Morrison, Sally Place, Rosalie
Resnick, Mary Robinson, Jane Schneider, Margaret
Spencer.
BUSINESS STAFF
*nF, Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER...........W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER............BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER....................
.........................CATHARINE MC HENRY
PEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Fred Her-
trick; Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Contracts, Jack Bellamy; Advertising Service, Robert
Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circulation, Jack Ef-
roymson.
ASSISTANTS: Meigs Bartmess, Van Dunakin, Milton Kra-
mer, John Ogden, Bernard Rosenthal, Joe Rothbard,
James Scott, David Winkworth.
WOMEN'S BUSINESS STAFF
Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell, Winifred Bell, Mary Bursley,
Peggy Cady, Betty Chapman, Patricia Daly, Jean Dur-
ham, Minna Giffen, Doris Gimmy, Billie Griffiths, Janet
Jackson, Isabelle Kanter, Louise Krause, Margaret
aMustard, Nina Pollock, Elizabeth J. Simonds.
NIGHT EDITOR: GEORGE VAN VLECK
iterfraternity Coun ci.
Ould Shirk Duty .
S TUDENT self-government suf-
fered a distinct set-back in the
eyes of close observers Wednesday night when a
proposal was offered to have the faculty members
of the Interfraternity Council Judiciary Commit-
tee sit as a special Indictment Board to hear the
initial evidence in support of alleged violations of
rushing rules.
Self-government naturally implies self-disci-
pline and self-punishment, and the plan to put
the faculty members of the committee in the
saddle and leave out the students is an admis-:
sion of weakness on the part of the student mem-,
bers. Unless students are willing to accept the re-
sponsibility, however onerous it may be, of con-
ducting trials, it is difficult to see how we can
have student government.
The reason advanced for the proposal-that
the board would afford more secrecy to the in-
vestigation proceedings and hence encourage the
presentation of accusations -is not a valid one,
since under the present system, the proceedings of
the Judiciary Committee are kept secret, and the 1
names of parties presenting evidence'or charges
are not divulged.
The point of view of the students on the com-
rnittee is apparently grounded in a desire to be
able to say after the matter is closed that they
did not have anything to do with it, that it was
done by the indictment board.
Of course we grant that it is not a pleasant
task to sit in judgment upon another fraternity,
lut this objection is only a minor consideration
compared with the fact that the responsibility
for enforcing the council rules lies more than with
anyone else with council officials.
There is a distinct contrast between the attitude
expressed in the proposals of Wednesday night
and the recent actions of the Undergraduate
Council on Student Affairs. On one hand we have
a dodging of responsibility by seeking to have the
faculty step in and take the brunt of the meanest
part of the job. On the other we have a group of
students passing judgment on others, even close
friends in some cases, fulfilling their unpleasant
duty willingly.

Pictures Now Will Mean
An Early-May 'Ensian ...
T HE STAFF' of the 1933-34 Mich-
iganensian are real workers-they
are bent on giving us our year-book by the first
of May, which is earlier than an 'Ensian has ever

Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disre-
garded. The names of bommunidants will, however,j
be regarded as confidential upon request. Contribu-
tors are asked to be brief, confining themselves to
less than 300 words if possible.
To The Editor:
When we came back to the campus this fall
we were greeted by a group of campus politicians
shouting, "Have you signed the NRA pledge?"
Among those few who refused to sign were those,
who recognized that: 1) They hired no help and.
therefore their support could at best be only sec-
ondary. (2) They would not be able to distinguish
between those concerns which were really living
up to the code and those who had only raised
prices and put up a picture of a bird. (3) We
are all associated with an institution which is
not attempting to live up to the ideals of the
NRA (the University).
Nevertheless many signed this pledge, among
them some fraternity men. The pledge implied
that they would try to live up to the spirit of the
NRA. When it was pointed out that they violated
it most seriously they hid behind a legal tech-
nicality and the same old excuse as all other vio-
lators have used "We can't afford to pay a fair
wage."
What became of all the nice cards signed by
the supporters of the NRA?
-Student.
EDITOR'S NOTE: As reported in The
Daily, issue of November 7, Albert J. Koepcke,
special agent of the NRA in Detroit, and A.
J. Barnaud, district compliance director, have
ruled that campus fraternities and sororities,
which do not operate for profit, and which
do not cater to the general public and do not
compete with restaurants, are completely ex-
empt from the NRA blanket or restaurant
codes, or any variants thereof.
Collegiate Observer
-. - AI

Hopwood Poetry
THE FOLLOWING POEMS are by Elizabeth
Davis, a graduate of Butler University. She
is at present working for her Master's Degree in
English. The following poems have not as yet
been entered in the Hopwood Contest. On Tues-
day they will be reviewed by Mr. Sigmund Proctor,
of the English Department.
Ten O'clock Boat
Stand close --I want to hold your arm and lean
To watch that stick that's tangled in the waves.
Now it's beneath the boat . . . How queerly that
bright light
Away out there beyond the point behaves!
See, there's the lighthouse . . . That must be a
ship -
That green light and that blotch of smoke against
the moon.
Stand close, the wind is blowing cold tonight;
I think we'll be inside the harbor pretty soon.
Look, when a big wave comes and lifts us up
The land slips down and only sky is there;
Stand close - the next dip down I want to see
You blot that biggest star out with your hair.
I Son et
O trouble not, impatient one, the heart
With vain command from the impassioned will,
Or strive to make the thing ungrown fulfill
Conceptions from its certainties apart;
Because the quick mind sees the fragile start
Of some deep thing within it, voiceless still,
Scourge not the pulse for its persistent chill
Before a fire transcending all its art.
The rose that trembles into birth at dawn,
And knows the bright impatience of the sun
All warm upon its slowly flushing cheek,
Uncurls no petal till the time has gone;
Each knows, unhastened full perfection won -
The rose its hour, the heart its time to speak.

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place advertisements with Classified
Advertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
The classified .columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advanee-31c per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions.
10c per reading line for three or more
insertions.
Minimum 3 lines per insertion.
Telephone rate-15c per reading line
for one or two insertions.
14e per reading line for three or more
insertions.
10% discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
By contract, per line-2 lines daily, one
month. ..................8c
4 lines E.O. D., 2 months.........3c
2 lines daily, college year.......7c
4 lines E. O. D., college year.......7c
100 lines used as desired.......9c
300 lines used as desired.......c
1,000 lines used as desired.......7c
2,000 lines used as desired ........ 6c
The above rates are per reading line,
based on eil. t reading lines per inch.
Ionic type, upper and lower case. Add
6c per line to above rates for all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bold face, upper and lower case. Add
10c per line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 7% point
;ype.
HELP WANTED
STUDENTS desirous of increasing
their weekly allowance through di-
rect sales of a new automobile nov-
elty. Sells at sight. 150 per cent
profit. Little money required to
start. Write Daily Box 10A 155
"The WALL STREET JOUR-
NAL is business and financial
education. Send for sample copy
and special student'rates with-
out obligation. 44 Broad Street,
INew York."

LOST
LOST: Five-gallon white and brown
jug, labeled "tung oil" in blue
paint. Reward if returned to 214
W. Engineering Bldg. 153
LAUNDRY
WE DO your laundry work for one-
half the usual price. Phone 2-3739.-
8x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 4x
PERSONAL laundry service. We take
individual interest in the laundry
problems of our customers. Girls'
silks, wools, and fine fabrics guar-
anteed. Men's shirts our specialty.
Call for and deliver. 23478, 5594.
611 E. Hoover. 9x
HOME HAND LAUNDRY: Bachelor
special - four pounds beautifully
finished shirts, 6c extra. Also
rough dry 8c per pound. Shirts fin-
ished $10 extra. Phone 8894. 7x
STUDENT and Family Laundry.,
Good soft water. Will call for and
deliver. Telephone 4863. 3x
WANTED
WANTED TO RENT: Microscope for
next 8 weeks. Must be good. Jack-
son 5672. 156
WANTED TO BUY MEN'S OLD AND
new suits ana oyercoats. Will pay
3, 4, 5, and 8, 9 dollars. Phone Ann
Arbor, 4306, Chicago Buyer. 5x

TAXICABS
TAXI--Phone 9000. Seven-passenger
cars. Only standard rates. ix
NOTICE
BLUE BIRD BOOK NOOK. Latest
books, clean wcovers. 5c day. Uni-
versity Music House. 6x
SHAMPOO and finger wave, 50c
Mondays and Wednesdays. Rag-
gedy Ann Shop. Phone 7561. 11x
BUY NEW AND USED CARS FROM
FINANCE CO. 311 W. Huron 22001.
1933, 1932, 1931, 1930 models. 12x
ARCADE CAB. Dial 6116. Large com-
fortable cabs. Standard rates.
2x
LIRETTE'S shampoo and finger wave
75c every day. Dial 3083. 103
EDITORIAL WORRIES
BOZEMA.N, MONT. --(P)- Report-
ers who don't write legibly and a
typewriter dimmed by age are respon-
sible for the worried frown Ben Law,
editor of Exponent, Montana State
college student newspaper, is wearing.
The favorite "mill' of the Exponent
stall is in the repairmen's hands and
the only other machine the paper
boasts is of 1913 vintage. "If we don't
get that mill back by Saturday the
E x p o n e n t won't be published on
time," Laws says. "The printers can't
read the reporters' writing and the
1913 machine doesn't work so good."

CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY

By BUD BERNARD
Freshmen women at the University of Alabama
need additional instruction in their studies will be
coached by senior women who are leading in schol-
arship. This is the first time such a project has
been attempted there.
* * *
A dog entered the college dining hall at Mar-
stens College in search of food. ,Someone took
pity on the friendless mutt and offered him a
weiner. The dog sniffed twice, smiled as dogs
will and made a beeline for the entrance.
* * *
Complaining that she had been a "football
widow" too long, the wife of a California football
coach filed a suit for a divorce recently. The
coach, she said, dreamed and talked about foot-
ball all of the time. "Once, she added, "he gave me
a dollar and said, 'Now I want my half back.' "
* * *
Rouge, powder, and lipstick have been barred
from the freshmen class of the new college of
Liberal Arts at the University of Pennsylvania.
The ruling was formulated by the sophomores as
part of the traditional hazing of freshmen.
* * *
Also freshmen girls at the University of Arizona
are made readily distinguishable by the presence
of one green glove and green stockings.
* * *
We wonder about some of the regulations im-
posed upon students here; after looking about a
bit for evidence of the same things at other
universities, we find that Michigan's authorities
are not of a unique species in comparison with the
martinets who stand in loco parentis in other
universities.
S* * *
. Arkansas College demand. that "all articles, in-
cluding trunks, shall be plainly marked with the
owner's name (twice on the outside and once on
the inside.)
* * *
At Beloit College a girl may, not take a-
bath after 10:30 p. m. without suffering de-
merits. Further demerits threaten the Beloit
girl who wears mules "or any but slippers with
soft soles throughout the building after the
retiring bell."
* * *
At Vassar "no one may ride with a man with-
out special permission from the warden." This in-
cludes fathers and brothers.
* * * .
The following is from a University of Mississippi
bulletin: "The college believes that the use of to-
bacco in any form is injurious to the user.. The
management is aware of the fact that many of
the best citizens use tobacco, but it does not be-
lieve that using it makes them any better Chris-
tians or citizens. Its use on the college campus
will not be tolerated at all. No student who uses
tobacco will be premitted to represent the college.
in any public way."
* * *
Bluefield College in West Virginia "does not
approve of certain forms of social activity such as
dancing and playing cards."
* * * .
Wellesley rules that "no person may stand
up in a canoe." The rule is designated for

Editorial Comment
- - - - - - - -
AUUSTRALIA'S
COMEBACK
Australia, one of the first countries to feel the'
world depression, now claims a more enviable
leadership in being the first to work out national
recovery in accordance with a planned program.
The recent budget speech of Prime Minister J. A.
Lyons gave justification for the claim, for red
ink had turned to black, the business chart again
showed an upward line and Mr. Lyons found it
possible to announce the modification of numer-
ous drastic economies.
Australia's recovery plan has much in common
with that of the United States. It differed in in-
ception, however, being framed in 1931 at a con-
ference of Premiers and Treasurers of the six
states rather than by the leadership of a national
administration. The budget was balanced and all
government expenditures were reduced by 20 per
cent; a parallel to our own New Deal's budget
balancing and reduction of expenses by 25 per
cent. Economy measures included reduction in
payments to veterans, as here. Another step was
the conversion of state and Federal debts to lower
rates of interest, for a saving estimated by Mr.
Lyon at £1,280,000 annually. This process has just
been started in the United States. We have also
followed Australia's example of levying emergency
taxes, providing mortgage relief and constructing
public works.
The Australian Premier, who is also Common-
wealth Treasurer, now is able to announce an ex-
cess of revenue over expenditure totaling £3,547,-
000, representing an increase in receipts of £7,527,-
000 over last -yer's estimate. Although the fall
in gold prices for Australia's exports offset the
advantage derived from England's departure from
the gold standard, the total value of exports in-
creased more than £4,000,000. The Common-
wealth's credit improved, and Australian bonds
now enjoy high ratings.. .
This country hopes for the day when it will
hear good news similar to that imparted in Mr.
Lyons' message, namely: reductions in taxes on
personal and corporation income, on insurance
company earnings, on rentals, on land, on sales
and on shipping owned abroad, totaling £7,490,000.
At the same time, the Government announces in-
creases in old-age and superannuation pensions,
in war pensions, in payments to farmers and in
public works expenditures.
-St. Louis Post-Dispatch.
HE GOES RATHER FAR
Upton Close went rather far when he told a
Detroit audience that Americans "must realize
their existence is threatened" by Japanese im-
perialism. The author's familiarity with the rise
of the Japanese in the Orient, which makes his
report of Pacific affairs worth hearing, seems to
have led him in this instance to an excessively
alarmist conclusion.

1L

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WEDNESDAY,
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8 P.M.

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EDNA ST. VINCENT MILLAY
THE WORKS OF
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FATAL INTERVIEW
THE BUCK IN THE SNOW
A FEW FIGS FROM THISTLES
THE HARP WEAVERS
RENASCENCE

SECOND APRIL
ARIA DA CAPO
THE KING'S HENCHMAN
THE LAMP AND THE BELL
THREE PLAYS

SELECTED POEMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE

WAH, R'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

STATE STREET

MAIN STREET

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11

SNOW

RAIN

SLUSH

The Japanese are the first people of the Orient
to adopt the economic and military weapons of
the Occident, and to challenge the white man in
the Far East. They are today a new industrial na-
tion bidding against older industrial nations for
the trade of the raw material countries of Asia. In
this competition they have many natural advan-
tages, to which they do not hesitate to add the
use of military force when military force is expe-
dient. Their exploits in Manchuria and Northern
China are well known because of their military
character. What may not be so clear to all in this
country is the fact the Japanese also are con-
ducting aggressive trade wars against British,
Dutch, and American interests in India, Malaysia,
and the Philippines. In these conflicts the Jap-
anese are having considerable success without the

IN SUCH WEATHER PROPER CLEANING
AND PRESSING DONE THE
EERGIN E WAY

I

By SWISS

II

IS DOUBLY IMPORTANT TO PROLONG THE LIFE
OF EVEN THE FINEST FABRICS

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