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November 04, 1933 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-11-04

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

CHIGAN DAILY
Established 1890

N'I

f :-. -

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il

- - -
-- -
Published every morning except Monday during the1
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-i
tion a the Big Ten News Service.
zorciatd . ategite res
° 1933 NAI 'AL = C VEAGE 1934 --
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use;
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, asa
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by!
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail.
4150. During regular school year by carrier, $3.75; by
mnail, $4.2.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Represetatives: College Publications Representatives,
Tinc., 40 Eist Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylston Sireet, Boston;u612 north Michigan Avenue,
Chicago. EDITORIAL STAFF1
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR ......... THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR.............C. HART SCHAAF
CITY EDITORL..................... BRACKLEY SHAW
SPORTS EDITOR...............ALBERT H. NEWMAN
WOMEN'S EDITOR...................CAROL J. HANAN
NIGHT EDITORS: A. Ellis Ball, Ralph G. Coulter, Wil-
liam G. Ferris, John C. Healey, E. Jerome Pettit, George
Van Vieck, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Donald R. Bird,
Arthur W. Carstens, Sidney Frankel, Roland L. Martin,
Marjorie Western.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara Bates, Eleanor Blum,
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan.
REPORTERS: Roy Alexander, John A. Babington, Ogden
G. Dwight, Paul J. Elliott, Courtney A. Evans, Ted R.
Evans, Bernard H. Fried, Thomas 'Groehn, Robert D.
Guthrie, Joseph L. Karpinski, Thomas H. Kleene, Rich-
ard E. Lorch, David G. Macdonald, Joel P. Newman,
Kenneth Parker, George I. Quimby, William R. ,Reed,
Robert S. Ruwitch, Robert J. St. Clair, Arthur S. Settle,
Marshall D. Silverman, A. B. Smith. Jr., Arthur M.
Taub, Philip T. Van Zile.
WOMEN REPORTERS: Dorothy Gies, Jean Hanmer,
Florence Harper, Marie Held, Eleanor Johnson, Jose-
phine McLean, Marjorie Morrison, Sally Place, Rosalie
Resnick, Mary Robinson, Jane Schneider, Margaret
Spencer.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER...........AW. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER..........BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER....................-.
.... ................ CATHARINE MC HENRY
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Fred Her-
trik; classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Contracts, Jack Bellamy; Advertising Service, Robert
Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circulation, Jack Ef-
roymson.
ASSISTANTS: Meigs Bartmess, Van Dunakin, Milton Kra-
mer, John Ogden, Bernard Rosenthal, Joe Rothbard,
James Scott, David Winkworth.
WOMEN'S BUSINESS STAFF
Jane 'Bs iett, Virginia Bel, Winifred Bell, Mary Bursley,
Peggy Cady, Betty Chapman, Patricia Daly, Jean Dur-
ham, Minna Giffen, Doris Gimmy, Billie Griffiths, Janet
Jackson, Isabelle Kanter, Louise Krause, Margaret
Mustards Nina Pollock, Elizabeth J. Simonds.
NIGHT EDITOR: A. ELLIS BALL
Appointment Of
Professor Hayden . ..
E VERYONE who knows Professor
Hayden will rejoice at the honor
that has been done him by President Roosevelt in
appointing him Vice-Governor of the Philippines.
A Republican, his appointment is a tribute alike
to his own ability and to the fairness of the Presi-
dent.
Professor Hayden's friends are not- the only
ones who will welcome the selection. The Philip-
pines will be happy to have as Vice-Governor a
man who is their friend and who has expert, first-
hand knowledge of their many problems.
When Congress passed the unfair Philippine bill
last June, euphemistically calling it the bill for
Philippine Independence, Professor Hayden did
not mince words in denouncing it as sordid and
selfish. Pointing to its numerous unfair provi-
sions, he called for a return to the magnanimous
spirit we had in taking the islands,
Professor Hayden declared the bill was in the
best interests neither of this country as a whole
nor of the Philippines. 'We may be sure that his
presence in the islands will be in the best interests
of both peoples.
Interfraternity Coun ciis
Steward Association .. .

leaders will add to the stadium atmosphere with
yells. Half the fun of a football game is in the;
crowd, and it will be there too.
Without a doubt this means of seeing the game
is far superior to hearing it over the radio, where
insufficient description, hesitancy on the part of;
the announcers, and faulty reception are likely to
cut a listener off at the time he is most interested.
The Grid Graph portrays in detail each move as
it is made. The player who carries the ball is in-
dicated by a light beside his name, or the passer, re-
ceiver, or kicker is shown in the same manner.
Another series of lights indicates to the audience
what the play is - a forward pass, a lateral, a
kick, etc.
Finally, on the center square of the device, the
field itself is shown, and watchers are able to tell
at once where the ball is in play and how far it'
must be carried to either a first down or a touch-
down - the latter an element that is invariably1
omitted by announcers.
Last week more than 250 students attended the'
inauguration of the device on the occasion of the
Michigan-Chicago game at Chicago, and were un-
animous in their praise of the Grid Graph as
something that fills a long-felt need here
The showing this afternoon is expected to
attract an even greater crowd of students and
others interested in the team who are not able to
go along when the schedule takes them from home.
Ambitious plans to make the Grid Graph more
and more of a success are being made by the
Union and the Alumni Association, co-sponsors. It
will be a football game in the Union Ballroom,
with all the fun and music and cheers. And ad-I
mission will be only twenty-five cents.
Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disre-
garded. The names of communicants will, however,
be regarded as confidential upon request. Contribu-
tors are asked to be brief, confining themselves to
less than 300 words if possible.
A LITTLE EXPLANATION
To the Editor:
A little explanation to the article "Student Says
War Is Expected, Aroused By Students in China,"
published in The Daily, Oct. 31, 1933.
She - Miss Louise Van Evera, '37 - said, "The
Majority of the Chinese people are so used to
war-." We all know that the farming portion of
the human race is the most inert to any change
of thought and habit. The majority of.the Chinese
population are farmers. The Chinese have been a
peace-loving Mace for the past five thousand years.
Referring to the student agitation toward anti-
Japanese feeling, it is true that the students are
more or less sensitive toward Japanese invasion.
Following every new Japanese mistreatment of
China, such as the insulting Twenty-One Demands
or more recently the unwarranted Shanghai mas-
sacre, there always has been an anti-Japanese
movement of some kind. You can see that these
actions are reactions to the outside stimuli. In
a true sense these actions are aimed at nothing
more than "Let us alone." So the reactionary
anti-Japanese feeling can not very well compare
with that between France and Germany which
Miss Evera feels very "bad" about.
If that is the kind of anti-Japanese agitation
by the Chinese students to which she refers then
I am quite proud of it. For it is the only resource
China has left with which to meet the ruthless
Japanese invasion. If China lets Japan have
Manchuria without a word from even the stu-
dents, and the U.S.A. lets Japan take California
without a scrap, what will happen? I shall leave it
to the reader's imagination.
Both France and Germany have territorial am-
bition and a superiority complex. How can these
be compared with the reactionary self-preserva-
tion, which is the so,-called anti-Japanese feeling
of the Chinese!
Therefore, I do not think it is as bad as Miss
Evera thought. Sixteen years in China, if she had
been of more mature age and in the right position
might have made her an authority on some
Chinese affairs. I presume, however, that the
major part of those sixteen years were spent in
childhood.
As concerns Pearl Buck's "The Good Earth,"
the authoress has admitted herself, a few months
ago, that her book does not represent the true
picture of Chinese peasant life of today. I sin-

cerely hope that the readers of the recent article
will accept this as an added explanation.
L. H. Lee, Spec.

kel). a foreign prince (Ivan Lebedeff) and her
suitor and press agent (Lee Tracey).
Miss Harlow is vivacious and confident, al-
though her job is not notably brilliant. Tracy
never had such an opportunity for fast-thinking;
it is difficult to imagine anyone else in his role.
"Bombshell," highly exaggerated mirror of
Hollywood life though it is, provides an unusual
amout of material for one to conjecture over.
Even the casual newspaper reader will recognize
the source of most of the author's story.
" 7ING for a night" is, for about two-thirds of
its footage, a good comedy about a minister's
son who becomes a prize-fighter. Then it unex-
pectedly develops into terrific prison death house
drama.
Chester Morris is the fighter who takes the
blame for the murder of John Milian, although
his sister Helen Twelvetrees, has killed him. Alice
White has a small role, that of the fighter's girl.
The actual star of the film is Grant Mitchell,
playing the minister-father of Morris. Here is an
elderly character whose sincerity, in this as well
as in the recent pictures, is noteworthy.
A Washington
BYSTANDER

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VICTORY BALL
NEXT FRIDAY
ALL-CAMPUS FLOOR SHOW

By KIRKE SIMPSON
WASHINGTON - Secretary Hull looks forward
hopefully to his Pan-American tour. He is
the first American secretary of state in many a
day to have projected such a mission for himself.
The fact that he planned it long before Presi-
dent Roosevelt moved to initiate the Russo-Ameri-
can conferences served to relieve the trip of the
interpretation which otherwise might have been
placed upon it.
It was whispered, of course, that Mr. Hull's
pride of office urged him to absent himself while
highly important diplomatic negotiations, the
most important to date of the Roosevelt ad-
ministration, were conducted by the President di-
rect instead of through his secretary of state.

*

I

JHE President recognized the existence of such
whispers when he asked Mr. Hull to postpone
his departure long enough to be here when For-
eign Commissar Litvinoff arrived.
There could be no other reason for the post-
ponement. Arrangements already had been made
for Assistant Secretary Moore, Hull's long time
friend and house colleague, to back-stop the Pres-
ident in the negotiations with Litvinoff.
The Virginian took over promptly as adminis-
tration clearing house on Russian matters. In his
case, however, political as well as other questions
involving Russia are centered. Henry Morgen-
thau's Russian clearing house function dealt only
with trade suggestions and proposals.

t
a
a
r
:
e
.

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* * *

'I

SECRETARY MOORE will have the aid of
Under-Secretary Phillips when it comes to
diplomatic niceties. That may be important. The
Roosevelt-Litvinoff conversations are not expected
to go beyond outlining principles of agreement,
if one leading to recognition of Russia is reached.

* #*.,

I

a might be noted that Secretary Hull is taking
a fhfron the book of a famous predecessor,
Elihu Root, in his Pan-American trip. After the
Spanish-American war, Latin-America looked
with jealous fear toward the colossus of the north.
Cuba and the far-away Philippines flew the Stars
and Stripes. Neighbors to the south wondered
what was coming next, how far an expanding
policy of imperialism at Washington might go.
Root, as secretary of state, went southward. His
trip bore fruit in years of comparative tranquility
for the south as to North American purposes.
The Pan-American conference, itself, was an out-
growth of his efforts.

-
1 i.

GET

RESULTS

7PR O OF

-_';

MICHIGAN

CLASSIFIED

DAILY

ADS

that Electric Cooking'
conserves precious minerals! '
The following table shows in actual figures why electric
cooking is more healthful. It shows the measured loss
of nutritive value in vegetables by STEAMING (water-
less electric cooking) vs. BOILING (the old-fashioned
cooking method):
LOSS OF NUTRITIVE VALUE IN VEGETABLES-
STEAMING VS. BOILING
(Journal of hogme Economics, Vol. 17, No. 5)
AVERAGE OF ALL VEGETABLES
Dry Matter Protein Calcium Magnesium Iron Phosporug
Lose Loss Loss Loss Lose Loss
Boiled .. 39,4 43.0 37.0 44.7 46.4 48.0
Steamed. 14.0 16.0 13.0 18.6 16.7 21.3
Electrically cooked vegetables are not only more health.
ful but taste better. Half-a-cup of water is ample to cook
them to melting tenderness. Because they cook in their
own juices, vegetables retain precious minerals and im.
portant food values. None of these elements are lost
through evaporation or poured down the sink when the
cooking is finished.
You can own a modern electric range for $89.50 installed.
See them on display at your dealer's or any Detroit
Edison office,
THE DETROIT EDISON co.

i

NOW, with another Pan-American conference
approaching, Secretary Hull wants to carry the
Roosevelt "good neighbor" doctrine into Latin-
America. The fact that he is a long-time cham-
pion of using trade relations and the free inter-
change of goods through negotiated tariffs to fos-
ter good will abroad should make him very wel-
come.

Re' ligious Activitiles

f

f

Collegiate Observer

A GOOD EXAMPLE of what real'
service the Interfraternity Council
can perform is seen in the Stewards Association
it has organized. Composed of house managers
from all fraternities, it has established for the
use of its members complete market infognmation
in the field of canned goods - what wholesale
houses carry what brands and at what prices.
The success of the plan cannot be measured at
present, and there is no doubt that it depends
almost entirely upon the amount of support it
receives from house managers and presidents.'
For the reductions in prices it hopes to obtain
will be achieved in proportion to the number of
houses that participate.. .
A discouraging lack of interest in this vital,
money-saving organization will convince the
founders that it is not worth continuing, whereas
a full enrollment on the part of all house man-
agers who are able to join will insure its success.
No blame for lack of interest will ever be
leveled at the stewards who have not signed up
to co-operate, and no attempt will be made to
force any house to join against its will. Since"
the more houses that co-operate in this project,
the greater will be the good for each, we strongly
urge all house managers to join the Stewards
a,.oa nr1 rmt ther hoard hills.

TO THE EDITOR:d
I have read with interest your editorial of Octo-
ber 27 upon the "Last of a Great Line," the refer-
ence being to the Rev. Fr. William Gagnieur; S. J.
I note you overlooked to mention that for the
past two or three years, when not devoted to his
professional duties, he gave the most of his time
to revising, arranging, and adding to the volumi-
nous notes he had assembled during his life upon
the Indian language with which he was so familiar.
These notes under his own supervision by his own
secretary and in his own office, by our request,
were prepared systematically and are ready for
publication. The title of the volume is "The Ojib-
way Language or a Glimpse at Some Peculiarities
of the Algic Dialects," by Rev. William Gagnieur,
S. J. The manuscript consisting of nearly 100
pages was transmitted to this department of the
University Museum a few months ago and is filed
in the library. connected therewith together with
several letters appertaining to his linguistic stud-
ies.
H. B. Hinsdale
Screen Reflections
By HUBBARD KEAVY
HOLLYWOOD, Nov. 4. -(')- The more or less
private life of a movie star, with material drawn
from the semi-private lives of many stars, is the
story of "Bombshell," a picture kidding the pic-

i

06

By BUD BERNARD
Realizing that a large number of students enter
the university just to get by, a professor at Col-
olorado University proposes two degrees for arts
colleges. For those who just get by he would con-
tinue to grant A. B.'s.
Many others however, do greatly superior work
in the university and he claims that these people
should have more to show for it. He therefore
suggests another degree, an A. B. Q. A. B. Q. would
mean bachelor of arts with quality.

06

An enterprising Yale journalist is contemplat-
ing the printing of hitch hiker's guide for the ben-
efit of the Eli's who bum their way to New York
every week-end.

First Methodist
Episcopal Church
A COMMUNITY CATHEDRAL
State and Washington
Ministers
Frederick B. Fisher
Peter F. Stair
10:45-Morning Worsmp.
"My Personal Religious
Experience"
7:30- Evening Worship.
"LIFE AT ITS BEST"
Dr. Fisher, preaching at both
services
STALKER HALL
(For Students)
12:15 - Half-hour Forum on the ser-
mon with Dr. Fisher.
3:00 -International Student Forum.
6:00 - Student-led Devotional Serv-
ice.
St. Paul's Lutheran
(Missouri Synod)
West Liberty and Third Sts.
November 5
9:00 A.M. - Preparatory Service in
German.
9:30 A.M. - Service in German and
Holy Communion
9:30 A.M. - Sunday School and Bible
Class.

YOUR

10:30 A.M. -Service
the Pastor.

R ELIGIOUS
ACTIVITIES

The atheltic department at the University
of Akron has outlined a sportsman's code. It
is as follows:
1. Thou shalt not quit.
2. Thou shalt not alibi.
3. Thou shalt not gloat over winning.
4. Thou shalt not take unfair advantage.
5. Thou shaltnot be a rottenloser.
6. Thou shalt not ask odds thou art unwill-
ing to take.
7. Thou shalt always be ready to give thine
opponents the shade.
8. Thou shalt not under-estimate an op-
ponent nor under-estimate thyself.
9. Remember that the game is for the

N EGLECT

9:00 a.m.-Bible School. Lesson topic:
9:00 A.M. - Service in German lan-
guage.

Zion Lutheran
Church
Washington St. at 5th Ave.
E. C. Stellhorn, Pastor

with sermon by

w

The Fellowship of
Liberal Religion
(Unitarian)
State and Huron Streets
Sunday at 10:45 A.M.
"Fifteen Martial Years
of Peace"

5:30 P.M. - Student fellowship and
supper.
6:45,P.M. -Rolse Hothedt. a member
of the University expedition to
Egypt, will speak on "'Customs of
Egyptian People."
St. Andrews
Episcopal Church
Division at Catherine Street
Services of Worship
Sunday, November 5, 1933
8:00 AM.--Holy Communion
9:30 A.M.-- Church School
11:00 A.MI. - Kindergarten
11:0 A.M.-Holy Communion and
Sermon by the Reverend Henry
Lepwis

10:45:A.M. - Service in English.

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