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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 02, 1933 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

!losson Speaks
Over Radio On
European Crisis
tates That Our Salvation
Lies In Complexity Of
Foreign Situation
Powers Not Divided
-ompares Present S t a t e
Of Affairs To That Of
Twenty Years Ago
"Perhaps in the very complexity of
he European situation today lies our
alvation," declared Prof. Preston W.
losson of the history department in
talk over the University Broadcast-
ig Service last night.
"There is a marked difference be-
veen the situation in 1914 and that
xisting today. There is no such fa-
%I division of the European powers
to two camps," he said.
Professor Slosson said that this is
11y in part reassuring, and that if
,ar came at this time it would be
ecause poverty and discouragement
ave reduced nations to a state of
oral anarchy in which almost any-
iing may happen.
Were Sliding in 1914
"In 1914 we were sliding down a
recipice and knew that unless we
)uld stop our accelerating speed
>mehow we would go over the edge.
'he exact nature of the danger was
ain before us for at least a decade
efore it happened," he said.
"Now we are not so much sliding
wn a sloperas wandering in a fog.
i that fog strange and unexpected
llisions may take place. Peace is
1 too much at the mercy of chance
id accident."

Detroit Riot Results In Wreckage And Injuries

-Associated Press Photo
A sample of damage done to property in Detroit when strikers
rioted, these broken windows were only part of wreckage resulting
from a month-old tool- and die-makers' strike. Five were injured and
six arrested in a fight with police following the melee.'
First Interfraternity Council
Formed To Control Wild Parties
EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the first of a series of articles on the history of
campus institutions, this one dealing with the early history of the Inter-
fraternity Council.

British Radio
Control System
Argued On Air
Authorities Participate In
Debate; Is Broadcast On
Country-Wide Network
The advisability of adopting the
British system of radio control and
operation was debated over the
coast-to-coast radio networks yester-
day under the auspices of the Na-
tional University Extension Associa-
tion Committee on Debate Materials,
under which the University spoisors
the interscholastic, debates in Mich-
igan high schools.
Upholding the affirmative of the
question were, Prof. E. C. Buehler, of
the University of Kansas; Dr. H. L.
Ewbank; of the University of Wis-
consin, and Prof. C. C. Cunningham,
of Northwestern University. The neg-
ative team included, Dr. Harry W.
Chase, president of New York Uni-
versity; Prof. C. H. Judd, of the Uni-
versity of Chicago; and Prof. T. V.
Smith, also of Chicago.
Public Interest Not Protected
The affirmative pointed out that
radio had sprung up over night, and
had developed in a hit or miss man-
ner. Professor Cunningham stated
that the public interest was not ade-
quately protected from quacks, for-
tune tellers, and the like, while only
one-twentieth of the stations in the
United States are educational in their
scope.
"We already spend over a half
million dollars a year to settle com-
mercial disputes," Professor Ewbank
stated, and added that this might be
used to a better advantage, as edu-
cational programs are used only as
filler for unsold time.
64 Per Cent of Time Not Used
Professor Judd retaliated for the
negative by pointing out that 64 per
cent of the radio time was not used
for commercial purposes, and was de-
voted to the better type of programs.
The negative also showed that the
American system is flexible and is
readily changed to fit the need.
Dr. Chase iridicated the results
that might come from political con-
trol, pointing out the suppressing of
the radio in Germany and Russia,
and showing that "there were less
than 25 men on the air in England
during the first six months of this
year on anything even resembling
public issues," while over 430 hours
were given free to government offi-
cials in America last year.
Pharmacy Students To
Visit Eli Lilly Company
Thirty student of the College of
Pharmacy and four members of the
faculty are leaving tomorrow for a
trip to Indianapolis, to visit Eli Lilly
& Co., manufacturers of pharmaceu-
tical products. They will return Sat-
urday.
The party is under the supervision
of Professors Clifford C. Glover,
Charles H. Stocking, and Justin L.
Powers of the College of Pharmacy,
and Edward C. Watts, assistant chief
pharmacist in University Hospital.
Plans include a trip to Lilly Co.'s
biological farm at Greenfield where
serums and other drugs are manu-
factured.

By MARGARET D. PHALAN
The first of a series of two articles
on the method of handling Union
and League elections which appeared
yesterday described the petition
which each candidate for the posi-
tions of president and secretary of
the Union must fill out and present
to the electoral board. The applicants
are members of the executive council
of the Union, and have served three
years in the Union organization;
their petitions include a resume of
their campus and Union accomplish-
ments and state what each man
would do if chosen for the office.
Shortly after this each applicant
gives a brief report to the board of
directors at a luncheon meeting.
Thus all applicants speak before the
entire board. Following this, per-
sonal interviews are held by each
member of the electoral board with
each applicant for the positions of
president and secretary.
Officers Recommend
After all of the men applying for
the key positions have been inter-
viewed, the president and secretary
then in office hand in recommenda-
tions and report on each man ap-
plying.
The electoral board then meets,
considers the petitions, recommenda-
tions, personal appearances, and in-
terviews, which each applicant has
gone through, and the appointments
are made.
Those applicants for the offices of
president and secretary who are not
selected are sometimes given the po-
sitions of vice-presidents, which are
elected by the school or college in
which the candidate is a student.
There are vice-presidents for the lit-
erary college, engineering college, the
Medical School, the Law School, the
Dental school, and the combined cur-
ricula.
The League officers are elected by
all the women on campus and not ap-
pointed on the merit basis as are the
Union heads. The system is set in
motion 10 days or two weeks before
the election takes place in the spring;
the two representatives of each class
on the board request some third
member of their class to meet with
them, and that group makes the
nominations for the Ldague posi-
tions. The president and vice-presi-
dent of the League then in office
and the two senior representatives
on the board examine the first nom-
inations and approve the final slate.
Then, on a set date, all women on
campus vote for the women who are
to head the League through the com-
ing year.
The elective offices of the League
are those of president, vice-presi-

dent, recording secretary, treasurer,
two senior representatives, two junior
representatives, and two sophomore
representatives on the League Board.
Members of the Judiciary Council are
also elected at the same time -one
senior member and two junior mem-
bers. One of the juniors becomes
chairman of the council her senior
year and the other continues as a
class representative, acting with the
single senior elected as mentioned
before.
There are several appointive
League offices, and the women chos-
en to these positions are picked by
the newly-elected president shortly
after the regular campus elections
have been held. The business secre-
tary is appointed thus, as are the
chairmen of the Undergraduate
Campaign Fund, board of represen-
tatives, and point system, social,
world fellowship, and library com-
mittee. A chairman of the candy
booth committee is appointed each
yeardby Senior Society or Mortar-
board.
Public school teachers of Philadel-
phia are studying puppetry and mar-
ionettes in a special course at the
Moore Institute of Art.

Union, League Election Methods
Are Outlined InDaily Survey
(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the second of a series of two articles prepared
by The Daily to acquaint students with the importance of Union and League
elections.)

5th District Alumni
To Meet In Chicago
Word has been received mere that
the annual business meeting and
banquet of the fifth district of the
Alumni Association will be held in
connection with the national ban-
quet of University of Michigan grad-
uates on Nov. 24, the night before the
Michigan-Northwestern f o o t b a l1
game, at the Hamilton Club, Clark
St., Chicago.
Officials expressed the belief that
the combining of these two impor-
tant functions on that date would
insure the presence of a large num-
ber of students and alumni at both
of them,
Thomas I. Underwood, '21, a for-
mer president of The Union, is in
charge of arrangements for the na-
tional dinner, which this year is be-
ing sponsored by the University of
Michigan Club of Chicago. Mr. Un-
derwood has not as yet definitely re-
vealed the program for the celebra-
tion, but it is expected that Michi-
gan's Varsity band will be present
to furnish music. The list of speak-
ers will undoubtedly include promi-
nent alumni and coaches.
A NEW LINE
Of Dixon, "Artist," and
"Draftsman" Pencils at
RIDER'S
302 South State Street

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The German republic, the League
f Nations, and the peace of Europe
re all victims of the present eco-
omic depression, Professor Slosson
;ated.
"Desperate men seek desperate
medies. The economic depression
iat made reparations and war debts
npossible to pay, changed Britain
'om the world's one great free-
-ade power into a protectionist em-
ire, and brought our own nation to
-y drastic experiments in the social
ntrol of private business, alone can
ccount for the transformation in
ae attitude of an apparent majori-
of the people toward liberty, de-
.ocracy, and international peace,"'
e said.
Nationalism Increased
"One of the effects of the depres-
on has been the strengthening of
rery force that makes for selfish na-
onalism and the weakening of every
rce that makes for international
iendship and understanding," Pro-
ssor Slosson said.
"Although clouds hang dark over
urope and the world today, there is
ill a good chance that behind them
e sun of prosperity is rising and
iat they may scatter before the
ghtning flashes in the thunderbolt
war," he concluded.
Dr. Ernest J. Abbott, research phy-
cist of the division of engineering
search, spoke on the same program
i "The Loudness of Sounds."
)iscuss Local
Government In
Meeting Here
A conference on local government,
e of a series of discussions on
vernmental topics being held all
er the country under the auspices
the sub-committee on political ed-
ation of the committee on policy
the American Political Science As-
ciation, will convene here Friday
.d Saturday. All sessions of the
nference will be closed to the
blic.
The conference will attempt to
emote the mutual acquaintance of
d the interchange of opinion
nong political scientists, public of-
ials, and interested citizens, al-
ough no attempt will be made to
aft programs of political reform.
Locally the conference is sponsored
the University and the Detroit
reau of Governmental Research.
ocal Government in Michigan" will
the main topic under considera-
n. This subject has been exten-
-ely explored recently in this State,
tably by the Commission of In-
iry into County, Township, and
hool District Government, whose
[ort and the reports made to i
members of its staff were pub-
ted early this year.

By GEORGE VAN VLECK
The Interfraternity Council, which
is now one of the most important or-
ganizations on the campus, had its
origin in a wild party, or perhaps it
was two wild parties, or perchance a
series of wild parties.
University authorities in 1912 be-
lieved that something ought to be
done about it, so they appointed a
committee of faculty members to look
into the situation.
Although records show that there
were meetings as early as January,
1912, of a group who called them-
selves the Interfraternity Conference,
official cognizance of the group did.
not come until later.
Ask Investigation
In June, 1912, the University Sen-
ate asked an investigation, by a com-
mittee, of the "house-clubs," the
general term used for national and
local fraternities and sororities, with
a view to "considering the question
of limiting social activities among
students, giving particular attention
to house-parties."
"This action was prompted," ac-
cording to the minutes of an early
meeting of the Senate, "specially by
reports of irregularities, a milder
word than some of the reports would
warrant, in the conduct of house-
parties."
On Oct. 18, 1912, the committee

announced that it did not want to
confine itself to the mere question
of limiting the social activities of the
students, but wished to treat the
questions and problems presented by
the house-clubs in general.
From Oct. 18, to March 7 of the
following year, the faculty commit-
tee, with usual faculty committeeJ
haste, debated the question and asked
leave to make a report, which was
in due time granted.
Many Charges Made
Among the charges which were lev-
eled at houses at that time, and it
would appear that anti-fraternity
agitators ever since have plagiarized
from them, were low scholarship, ex-
travagance, mismanagement, exces-
sive "student life" (whatever that
may be), bad taste, snobbishness, dis-
loyalty to the University by their ex-
clusiveness, serious dissipation of
time, and not infrequently even gross
immorality.
"Nothing seems more desirable," the
report continues, "than that our fra-
ternities and house-clubs generally
whether in one whole or in federated
groups should organize, not just out-
wardly and formally, but definitely
and really, for purposes of defense
against not only the opposition, but
also against the evils attendant upon
their own individualism."

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Lecture On Philosophy
Yesterday Well Attended
More than 50 students and faculty
members attended a lecture on "Pla-
tonic Philosophy in the Bible" given
by Dr. Alvin Boyd Kuhn yesterday
in Natural Science Auditorium. Dr.
Kuhn, long a student of theosophy,
presented the subject as scientifically
based on the wisdom of Greece and
Egypt, rather than on that of India
and then took up the evidence of
Plato's philosophy in the Bible.

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