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November 01, 1933 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-11-01

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THE MICHIGAN DAIY

CHIGAN DAILY
Established 1890

at directing is, of course, almost nullified by con-

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Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
t ion a~ I the Sig Ten News Service.
$zzodItftId 91 ate $rgez
- ?=1933<NIONAi- 4 verAGC3934
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to itor
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein.:,eAllrrights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscrption during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail.
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $3.75; by
mail, $4.25.
Offices: Student Publications Builing, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 21214.
Represeitatives: College Publications Representatives,
Inc., 40 Est Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylston Sreet, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL S 1AFF
Telephone 4925
MANAG NG EDITOR.........THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
'EDITORIAL DIRECTOR ...............C. HART SCHAAF
CITY EDITOR...................BRACKLEY. SHAW
SPORTS EDITOR...............ALBERT H. NEWMAN
WOMEN'S EDITOR ................... CAROL J. HANAN
NIGHT EDITORS: A. Ellis Ball, Ralph G. Coulter, Wil-
liam G. Ferris, John C. Healey, E. Jerome Pettit, George
Van Veck, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Donald R. Bird,
Arthur W. Carstens, Sidney Frankel, Roland L. Martin,
Marjorie Western.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara Bates,-Eleanor Blum,
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret Phalan.
REPORTERS: Ogden G. Dwight, Paul J. Elliott, Courtney
A. Evans, Ted R. Evans, Bernard H. Fried, Thomas
Groehn, Robert D. Guthrie, Joseph L. Karpinski,
Thomas H. Kleene, Burnett B. Levick, David G. Mac-
Donald, S. Proctor McGeachy, Joel P. Newman, John M.
O'Connell, Kenneth Parker, Paul W. Philips, George I.
Quimby, Mitchell Raskin, William R. Reed, Robert S.
Ruwitch, Marshall D. Silverman, A. B. Smith, Jr., Arthur
M. Tcau, Philip T. Van Zle.
WOMEN REPORTERS: Dorothy Gies, Jean Han.mer,
Florence Harper, Marie Heid, Eleanor Johnson, Jose-
phine McLean, Marjorie Morrison, Rosalie Resnick, Mary
Robinson, Jane Schneider, Margaret Spencer.
BUSINESS STAFF,
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER...........W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER. .........RADBERNARD E.: SCHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER................
......................... CATHERINE MC HENRY
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Fred Her-
trick; Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Contracts, Jack Bellamy; Advertising Service, Robert
Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circulation, Jack Ef-
roymson.
ASSISTANTS: Meigs Bartmess, Van Dunakin, Carl Fib-
iger, Milton Kramer, 'John Ogden, Bernard Rosenthal,
Joe Rothbard, James Scott, Norman Smith, David Wink-
worth.
WOMEN'S BUSINESS STAFF
Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell, Winifred Bell, Mary Bursley,
Peggy Cady, Betty Chapman, Patricia Daly, Jean Dur-
ham, Minna Giffen, Doris Gimmy, Billie Griffiths, Janet
Jackson, Isabelle Kanter, Louise Krause, Margaret
Mustard, Nina Pollock, Elizabeth J. Simonds.
NIGHT EDITOR: GEORGE VAN VLECK
Public Opinion
And Cartoons...
RECENTLY in the editorial columns
of The Daily there was printed
a discussion of a Chicago Tribune cartoon which
was intended to teach an economic lesson - a
reactionary economic lesson, it may well be added.
It is entirely correct to judge the Tribune by this
cartoon, just as it is entirely correct to judge
any paper by its manifestations in the cartoon
field.
Now there has been called to our attention a
cartoon in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, a paper
widely known and widely read because it sets
forth a progressive and liberal point of view. The
cartoon under consideration depicted a bloated
giant, sloppy and unshaven, slouching against
the marble pillars of the Missouri State Capital
at Jefferson City. On the facade of the capital
were the words - cynical now - "Salus Populi
Suprema Est."
This is constructive picturization of an alto-
gether too widespread prostitution of government.
The Tribune's cartoons, on the other hand, are
almost subversive in content, and add up to -
"trash."
Th T e Theatre

stant repetition; but his fine back-stage work
must be cited here, because it was one of five
things that prevented the performance from be-
ing totally dreary. The other four. were: Mr.
Henderson's acting, Francis Compton's acting,
Ainsworth Arnold's acting, and a particularly good
piece of dramatic exposition, on the part of the
author, which constituted the initial act.
In substance, the plot is this: a series of strang-
lings, of a decided East Indian odor, occur in the
ancestral park of the Lebanons, a noble English
family whose roots are lost in antiquity. Lord
Lebanon (Mr. Henderson), a hair-brained lord-
ling whose mother's apron-strings envelop him
like a straight-jacket, is affianced against his will
to Isla Crane (Thelma Paige), who is a protegee
of his mother (Margaret Anglin). Largely at Lord
Lebanon's request, Inspector Tanner (Mr. Comp-
ton) and Sergeant Totty (Mr. Arnold), of Scot-
land Yard, undertake an investigation of the
murders. The action is complicated by Two Un-
usual Footmen (Alan Handley and Charles Moy-
er) and A Mysterious Butler (Eugene Weber).
Edith Gresham also comes in for a moment dur-
ing Act II, but her purpose in the play was ob-
scure. Sergeant Ferraby (John Lucas) also is
involved to no apparent objective, unless Mr. Wal-
lace intended to use him for love interest and
then forgot about him.
Miss Angln was excellent as Lady Lebanon, the
tyrannical and essentially noble mother; but she
handled the role often in a manner that seemed
almost apathetic. The let-down from her work
last week was tremendous. We call her per-
formance excellent because Miss Anglin cannot
well prevent herself from being excellent; but cer-
tainly she lost countless opportunities in her in-
terpretation of the role.
Mr. Henderson's part, while fitted to his own
particular skill, nevertheless required a good deal
of care in order to be convincing. It was made
convincing. When Mr. Henderson is well cast, his
addition to the entertainment is almost always
noteworthy. The gradual transition in Lord Leb-
anon from mere fussy peculiarity to symptoms
of actual insanity was strikingly presented.
A colorless role was transformed by Mr. Comp-
ton into one of genuine appeal and sustaining
force. It was necessary for him to play against
the buffoonery of Mr. Arnold, and at the same time
retain both the dignity and the high courage of
Inspector Tanner. The latter quality was depicted
extremely well in the final sequence, when it fell
to Mr. Compton's lot to pacify a dangerous lu-
natic who menaced him with a revolver.
The peculiarly good casting of "Criminal At
Large" was a boon to Mr. Arnold, who found him-
self assigned to exactly the part for him - that of
the sergeant who thinks more slowly than the
occasion warrants. A number of times we were
tempted to condemn him for "mugging" a scene
- until it became clear that the business which
he was in the process of carrying out was written
into the script. This is a sufficiently eloquent
testimonial to his care in making all that pos-
sibly could be made of his assignment.
Among the secondary characters, Mr. Moyer
probably carried the honors as a Remarkable
Footman from America. Mr. Handley was not so
remarkable. Miss Paige was an agreeable in-
genue, but Mr. Lucas was decidedly stiff in a
part which called for more flexibility.
Elements in the play reminiscent of the Mauve
Decade included a sudden scream which woke
up the audience near the close of Act II, and
sleep-walking by Miss Paige. Better treament
was visible in the plot, which was flawlessly mo-
tivated, and whose outcome remained legitimately
uncertain until the moment for the showdown;
in Act I, which, in defiance of most laws of drama,
was the most entertaining of the three despite
the fact that it was chiefly occupied with expo-
sition; and in a highly tense climax, wherein the
criminal raved in gleeful but restrained madness
about the outrages which he had committed in
order to discover what it felt like to kill a man.
On the whole, one is distinctly under the im-
pression that Edgar Wallace has done better
work.
Editorial Comment

Musical Events
WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON
ORGAN RECITAL
Fantasie Triomphale...............Dubois
Sketch in D Flat ................Schumann
Cantabile...........................Franck
Fantasie in A ......................Franck
Fugue in D ......................Guilmant
In the Church ......................Novak
Impression, Op. 86, No. 9..........Karg-Elert
Passacaglia and Fugue ...............Diggle
Mr. Christian has given the prominent posi-
tion on this program to the two Franck numbers.
Franck was a French organist, modest and unas-
suming. His music is noted for its melody and
warmth of feeling.
Two transcriptions from orchestral music dis-
play the orchestral power that lies in the Hill
Auditorium organ. These are the first number,
which was written for orchestra and organ for
the opening of the Chicago Auditorium in 1893
and later revised for organ aloneby Dubois, and
the Novak "In the Church." This is part of the
Slovak Suite for orchestra.
Karg-Elert is an organ writer of the impres-
sionistic school, who uses pale, wandering effects,
or strident, staggering treament. He has kept up
with the change in the organ from a churchly,
austere instrument into the modern one of plas-
ticity and great color variety.
American talent is represented by the organist
of St. John's Church, Los Angeles, Mr. Diggle,
who has used a form made famous by J. S. Bach,
the Passacaglia and Fugue.
This program will be of interest to the lay aud-
ience as well as to the trained. Try to hear some
of it, if not all.
S. P.
A Washington
BSTANDEIR
By KIRKE SIMPSON
WASHINGTON, Oct. 31.-Two qualities in Pres-
ident Roosevelt have impressed themselves
profoundly on his governmental associates, par-
ticularly his cabinet officers. The fact that an
economic, or even a political experiment, never has
been tried is no argument against it at all in his
mind. And, once having decided on a course,
experimental or otheltise, the President demands
speedy action of his executive assistants to make
it good.
Some of his cabinet officers have found out that
last trait or are now in the process of learning
about it in a hard school of experience.
If, or when, there is a change in the Roosevelt
cabinet circle for other than health reasons, it
is quite likely to be traceable to slowness in the
up-take on the part of the outgoing official in
carrying out presidential policies.
THE speed with which Mr. Roosevelt reached
his gold-purchase policy decision, announced
it and put it into effect, is a striking example.
Less than 60 hours after he disclosed his purpose
the first made-in-USA gold quotation was out.
In the President's mind perfection of the ma-
chinery to determine the margin over world price
to be maintained, the setting up of methods under
which RFC joins the treasury as a government
gold hoarder, and all other details, were of se-
condary importance.
He wanted quick action to begin a test of the
theory of domestic commodity price regulation
through controlled fluctuation of the dollar value
of gold, and he got it. If he had not, somebody's
head would have been close to the decapitation
basket.
CANDIDATE McKee's new slogan in the may-
oral fight in New York City, "A vote for me
is a vote for President Roosevelt," may have left
the White House still outwardly maintaining a
hands-off policy in that fight.
It was notable, neverthless, that no Roosevelt
spokesman arose to combat that implication of
presidential support.

OMETHING else happened at the same time in
in New York which goes far to account for
McKee's confidence in claiming tacit Roosevelt
backing.
Chairman Macy of the republican state com-
mittee warned of what would happen if the party
lost its meagre majority foothold in ,the state
assembly.
"If we now permit a democratic assembly,"
Macy said, "we turn over to one party the business
of deciding how both parties may be represented
at Albany for many years to come."

TYPING
SHORTHAND
BOOKKEEPING
Day and Evening Classes
Starting Now
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Complete Courses in
General Business-Stenographic
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Secrtarial School
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ENSIAN
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Or $1. Down
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'Ensians and
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Directories
On Sale at
Student
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Building-.
CAMPUS
SALE
November 1st
and 2nd.

w
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MICHIGAMME
RESTAURANT
SPECIAL MEAL TICKET
Over $6.00 Worth for $4.50
Chicken and Steaks included
TICKET GOOD FOR 14 MEALS

TELE PHONE CO.

a Nw LIN
Of Dixon, "Artist," and
"Draftsman" Pencils at
302 South State Street
READ THE DAILY

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At 7 o'clock in the evening, and again at 8:30 P.M.,
substantial reductions in Station-to-Station long dis-
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Station-to-Station rates for three-minute calls, from
Ann Arbor to representative points are shown below:

DAY
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4

p.

AT EIGHT
Who has not heard of "Dinner at Eight," George
Kaufman and Edna Ferber's outstanding success,3
just completing a solid year at the Music Box in
New York, and playing through the summer to'
capacity houses in Chicago? And who will not be
overjoyed to hear that Robert Hendersonafter
presenting the show next week at the Cass in
Detroit, is to bring it here to Ann Arbor for a
week's run at the Majestic?
Mr. Henderson tells us he is presenting the
original stage play as one of his outstan ing pro-
ductions. It will be done with a stellar cast, in-
clude Miss Blanche Ring in the leading role of
Carlotta Vance, a former musical comedy star.
"Dinner at Eight" has been the success of the
year, the only play to be favored by the public
equally with Noel Coward's "Design for Living."
It is a fast-moving satire of life in New York,
and has through the year won a reputation as one
of the most exciting entertainments in the Amer-
ican theatre.
HENDERSON AT DETROIT CASS
"CRIMINAL AT LARGE"
A Review
Rv JOHN W. PRITCHARD

WE RECOMMEND
THIS ONE-
It is the fate of most professors of, history to go
on for years casting their pearls before half backs
who would much rather be out tackling a dummy
than in a classroom tackling the theories of Gib-
bon, Plato, De Tocqueville and Henry George.
But Prof. William E. Dodd, now the American1
ambassador at Berlin, has survived some years of
labor in the academic vineyard and on Thursday
he indulged that secret ambition of every scholar
and told a "practical man of affairs" what was
the matter with his regime. Inasmuch as the
practical man of affairs is Herr Hitler and inas-
much as thousands, including several Americans,
have been beaten up for saying less, Prof. Dodd
must be conceded a coup.
There is small probability that Herren Hitler,
Goring andGobbels will send out immediately for
sets of Thomas Jefferson's works as a prelim-
inary to restoring freedom of the press, the right
to free speech and toleration of Jews. Never-
theless, the lecture will do them no harm, for if
there is one thing that dictators and authoritar-
ians need more than anything else it is an occas-
ional reminder that their racket has been tried
and has flopped years and years before Mussolini,
Hitler, and Primo Rivera (if you recall the name)
were ever heard of. In every age a small body
of men with a vested interest have sought to tor-
ture, persecute and harry the rest of humanity
into protecting their threatened position. Some-
times they have succeeded for a time, at the ex-
pense of everybody else, in maintaining a pre-
carious hold to their advantage, but their eventual
surrender has usually been more painful and
ruinous than it would have been in the first place.
Academic historians are perhaps the only indivi-
duals who remember important facts like these.
Most other people rush to join some new phase of
the ancient dictatorship racket as if they had come

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That is a fact, not a theory. It accounts for
the otherwise confusing situation as to the part
the Roosevelt administration is playing privately
if not publicly, in the New York mayoral fight.

WAHR
STATE STREET

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE
MAIN STREET

a
i
y

Collegiate Observer
Observings from here and there -- A young
married couple are studying biscuit making
and law together at the University of Wash-
ington -"Radio writing" is a new course
being taught in the Medill School of Journal-
ism at Northwestern University - Most coeds
do not know the art of making up, the men
at Seagle College recently voted.
At Connecticut College the use of rouge is
distinctly a senior privilege. That should be
one way of telling senior girls from freshmen.
FROM OUR CONTEMPORARIES
"Most co-eds have brains - they are afraid

ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION presents
DOROTHY SANDS,
in her costume program
"Our Stage and Stars"

4

TONIGHT 8

P. M.

11

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