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October 26, 1933 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1933-10-26

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

CHIGAN DAILY
Established 1890

Screen Reflections
Four stars means extraordinary; three stars definitely
recommended; two stars, average; one star, inferior;
no stars, stay away from it.

The Theatre
AT THE LYDIA MENDELSSOHN:

" ~'

'* r

II

r:, ;

hed every morning except Monday during the
ty year and Summer Session by the Board in
of Student Publications.
r of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
the Big Ten News Service.

Ate reo
K 3934

1933

MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rateaof postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail.
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $3.75; by
mail, $4.25.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1l214.
Represe)-tatives: College Publications Representatives,
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylston Street, Boston; 612 NorthNMichigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL S AFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR.........THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR................C. HART SCHAAF
CITY EDITOR... ... .......BRACKLEY SHAW
SPORTS EDITOR...... .......ALBERT H. NEWMAN
WOMEN'S EDITOR....................CAROL J. HANAN
NIGHT EDITORS: A. Ellis Ball, Ralph G. Coulter, Wil-
liamG. Ferris, John C. Healey, E. Jerome Pettit, George
Van Vleck, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara Bates, Eleanor Blumn,
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret Phalan.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Donald R. Bird,
Arthur W. Carstens, Sidney Frankel, Roland L. Martin,
Marjorie Western.
REPORTERS: Ogden G. Dwight, Paul J. Elliott, Courtney
A. Evans, Ted R. Evans, Bernard H. Fried, Thomas
Groehn, Robert D. - Guthrie, Joseph L. Karpinski,
Thomas H. Kleene, Burnett B. Levick, David G. Mac-
Donald, S. Proctor McGeachy, Joel P. Newman,, John M.
O'Connell, Kenneth Parker, Paul W. Philips,:George I.
Quimby, Mitchell Raskin, William R. Reed, Robert S.
Ruwitch, Marshall D. Silverman, A. B. Smith, Jr., Arthur
M. Taub, Philip T. Van Zile.
WOMEN REPORTERS: Dorothy Gies, Jean Hammer,
Florence Harper, Marie Held, Eleanor Johnson, Jose-
phine McLean, Marjorie Morrison, Rosalie Resnick, Mary
Robinson, Jane Schneider, Margaret Spencer.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER............W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER.............BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER.................
...............................CATHERINE MC HENRY
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Fred Her-
trick; Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Contracts, Jack Bellamy; Advertising Service, Robert
Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circulation, Jack Ef--
roymson.
ASSISTANTS: Meigs Bartmess, Van Dunakin, Carl Fib-
iger. ilton Kramer, John Ogden, Bernard Rosenthal,
Joe Rothbard, James Scott, Norman Smith, David Wink-
worth.
WOMEN'S BUSINESS STAFF
Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell, Winifred Bell, Mary Bursley,
Peggy Cady, Betty Chapman, Patricia Daly, Jean Dur-
ham, Minna Giffen, Doris Gimmy, Billie Griffiths,, Janet
Jackson, Isabelle Kanter, Louise Krause, Margaret
Mustard, Nina Pollock, Elizabeth J. Sihonds.
NIGHT EDITOR: RALPH G. COULTER
Tragedy At The
First Methodist. .
T HERE was a tragedy enacted at
T the First Methodist Episcopal
Church last night. It was a hard, bitter, cruel
tragedy; the tragedy of an old man who was
admitting the defeat of something he had worked
for all his life - and yet never realizing that his
own attitude of mind was instrumental in that

AT THE MAJESTIC
"GOLDDIGGERS OF 1933"
"Golddiggers of 1933," brought back for the
students, falls short of "42nd Street" as the pieces
do not have that "42nd Street" rhythm. But then
again several things about it are excellent; music,
dancing, and photography. Outside of these a
musical show seldom has much to offer as it is
enough in itself.
The opening song is "We're In The Money."
Ginger Rogers (introduced cleverly) sings well
and the close-up photography here will intrigue
you. But the best production of Ned ("Death
Valley") Sparks, who is the backer in the movie,
is "The Shadow Waltz" featuring a pretty tune,
clever stage set, swinging ballet costumes utilized
in various formations, tricky photography, and
remarkable chorus singing and direction. The
lights on the violins are made a feature. Dick
Powell sings the "Torch Song" and in the role
of a young composer writes the music for the
show. (While he is singing someone should stand
in front of his face!) "Petting In The Park," the
longest of the numbers, gives an account of what
to do while "walking back," and has a clever
change from one scene to another. Up to this
point everything is fine, but now Bulging Joan
Blondell steps forth and sings (rather talks)
"The Forgotten Man Number" which inserts a
bit of breadlining,; soldier parading, and heavy
sentiment. The rest of the show is rather hu-
morous and this final touch of weighty rhythm,
although .done very,-well at that, seems rather
unnecessary.
You won't forget Warren William when he
wakes up a different and kinder man. Then
there is Guy Kibbee and Aline MacMahon, who
team well on the comedy side, while Ruby Keeler
(who doesn't dance enough in this show and sits
and moons instead) and Powell introduce the love
element. Both Blondell and William are worthy
of the parts they hold. Best is the humor of
Sparks.
Someone remarked that a better supporting
program might have been procured for a picture
that has been to town before. True. Hear Presi-
dent Roosevelt talk, football crowds cheer, and
geese squawk in the Hearst Metro-tone News,
while we are again told that Roosevelt is a great
man via the NRA feature, and that was all .. .
there ain't no more.
-R.E.L.
Editorial Comment

I
P
-o
ti
t:
f
0
S!
S
c
n
t:
E
a
a
t

THE SCHOOL SYSTEM
MUST NOT BE CRIPPLED.
Michigan's Legislative Council, busy with pre-
paring a program for the expected special session
of the Legislature, is trying to figure out a way
to keep the schools running normally throughout
the regular school year. Most of the anxiety, so
far, grows out of uncertainty. The past session
of theLegislature appropriated $15,000,000 for the
schools with this curious provision that the money
should be available if the sales tax yielded suffi-
ciently after paying twelve million for welfare, 19
million for the State's regular budget, $500,000 for
the University. of Michigan, $200,000 for Michigan
State College and $100,000 for carrying out the
administration of the act.
This policy of taking care of the primary schools'
as a sort of afterthought and making appropria-
tions out of funds that may not exist, is something
new in Michigan. The Legislative Council is re-
ported to be working on a plan to get school
money without necessitating a revamping of the
sales tax during the special session. Gov. Com-
stock and the Council do not seem to trust the
Legislature with the task of fixing what is bungled.
After, all, the job belongs to the Legislature.
The sales tax seems to"be yielding revenue beyond
expectation. By the time the Legislature is con-
vened the Administration will know more of what
to expect in the way of revenues than was known
when the Legislature made its appropriations
last spring. If the Governor, aided by the Legisla-
tive Council will lay a definite program before
the special session of the Legislature, there should
be no difficulty in providing for the schools ade-,
quately.

UNCLE TOM'S CABIN"-- A Review
By JOHN W. PRITCHARD
On the whole, Play Production did excellently
by Uncle Tom. It was well acted, and directed
with nearly adequate efficiency (except for one
or two glaring spots); it is unfortunate that the
quality of the script did not measui'e up to the
standards set by the players, most of whom man-
aged to get a great deal out of very little.
"Uncle Tom's Cabin" is a play which cannot
be supported by one or two excellent individual
performances. It depends rather upon great co-
operative effort, in order to offset its. episodic
character. The only unifying elements are Uncle
Tom and the didactic theme itself. This needed
union of purpose was well accomplished by the
actors, but was not visible in the script, or in
direction which failed in its too great concentra-
tion upon individual scenes to the great detri-
ment of the whole presentation. Further, there
were a few isolated points in scenes themselves
which were so badly directed as to be decidedly
bothersome.
It is difficult to decide whether to give acting
laurels to William Halstead, as St. Clair, or to
Frederic O. Crandall, who played Uncle Tom. The
latter quavered through the play in a very con-
sistent manner, giving a realistic conception of a
religious, emotional, and very ancient negro; his
role was, of course, the choicest in the piece, and
he made a very great deal of it. But Halstead
gave one of the finest bits of restrained acting
that this reviewer has seen in a student pro-
duction. Without any opportunity to exhibit the
emotionalism that is the pevalent note in the
play, Halstead made the character of St. Clair
a very sympathetic one, which stood out as a
rather excellent bit of artistry.
Jay Edward Pozz and Sarah Pierce teed off
effectively as Eliza and George Harris; it was
noticeable, however, that Miss Pierce's high-
strung passion was somewhat forced, and conse-
quently was unconvincing even in a colored role.
She was better as Emmeline, when she said al-
most nothing. Pozz was good throughout, al-
though he tended to become confused in his dia-
lects.
Topsy and Eva, played by Frances Manchester
and Mary Pray, did not play off well against each
other. This was not the fault of Miss Pray, whose
Eva was nearly flawless, but rather of Miss Man-
chester, who evidently has a high regard for the
wbrk, of Rosetta Duncan. Unfortunately Rosetta
Duncan burlesques; so does Miss Manchester. Net
result: a performance which would be grand in
a comedy, but is horrible in a straight production.
Other acting plums must go to James V. Doll,
who skillfully handled his comedy relief as Law-
yer Marks; to Ruth Hussey, who was clever
enough to play down the constantly reiterated
word "shiftless"; and to the unidentified inter-
preter of a just-about-ready-to-be-spiffed lover
who yearned to cross the ice for reasons which
should be whispered. People who were pretty
awful included Dena Sudow. as Chloe, and Lester
L. Griffith, as Simon Legree.
A further word should be stated about the
script. It is true that the purpose was to revive
the play as it had delighted audiences decades
ago; but anachronism is generally sure to bring
a laugh, and a certain amount of modernization
is necessary in order to smooth out audience ap-
peal. This modification can be so subtly handled
as to make the play acceptable without robbing
it of the desired nineteeth century atmosphere.
In this the script failed miserably. Lines which
were bonanzas then are decidedly risible now, and
many of these could have been altered without
the smallest amount of damage to the structure
of the play.
The tone of the production was depreciated by
scenery which, for the most part, looked as though
it might have been attacked by an army of
marching ants. Victor Lampell must be given
credit for his display of careful lighting technique,
but unfortunately his good work did not eliminate
the peeled-canvass effect of the backdrops. Cos-
tuming was excellent, make-up spotty.
The choice of a "classic" problem melodrama
for its opening presentation was an unfortunate
one on the part of Play Production, as was
attested by a ridiculously small audience. Never-
theless the entertainment element was high, and
the efforts of the actors laudably successful.

PRICE REDUCTIONS
AT CASS
Beginning with "A Party", which opened Mon-
day at the Cass Theater staring Margaret Anflin
and Mlle. Irene Bordoni, all seats for dramatic
festival productions will be reduced fifty per
cent. The seat scale now ranges from 75 and
50 cents for all performances.
This step has been taken by the management
in an endeavor to meet current difficult times
Robert Henderson, manager, promises that the
high standard set up during his four years of
festival productions will not be cheapened in any
degree.
Thenext play, staring Mss Anglin, Lester Vail,
and Mr. Henderson, will be Edgar Wallace's last
produced in England and serialized in America
as "The Case of the Frightened Lady."
If you like' shudders you'll get them aplenty,
and if you like excitement you'll get that too .
and both in an intelligent and immensely effective
way.
In the firts act Chief Detective Inspector Tan-
ner of Scotland Yard delves into the mystery of
the singular strangulation at Mark's Priory,
family seat of the Lebanan, finds a suspect, and
lectures to his class of recruits, using the mys-
tery as an example and thus familiarizing the
audience with its details. And then comes news
of the similar strangulation of the prime sus-
pect, Inspector Tanner embarks for Mark's
Priory and high adventure, and the play is on.

Have You
Purchased
Your
MICHIGAN-
ENSIAN
or $1. Down
Payment
'Ensians and
Student
Directories
On Sale at
Student
Publications
Building.,
CAMPUS
SALE
November 1st
and 2nd.

A strategic

point

in the, battle/or sales"
Today's intense competition calls for new and
more effective merchandising methods. Several
plans pioneered by Bell System men are proving
helpful.
For example: the "Where to Buy It" section
of the telephone book. Here localdealers are listed
beneath the trade-marks of advertised products-
such as Plymouth, Greyhound Lines, Exide,
RCA Victor. This service helps manufacturers
to reduce substitution, helps dealers to increase
sales, helps~you to locate the brand you want.
BELL SYSTEM

TShw N bee
FR '$ O VS tbH y.> 3t'd
t o firi Shoe
P@IlI S 81,tO 4 64,1 9
$1, C6t-7Z6

f/1

-4

TAKE A TRIP HOME BY TELEPHONE
- TONIGHT AT HALF-PAST EIGHT

f-

11

Leave Your Order NOW--for
Christmas Greeting Cards
Sample books now ready for your selection. They are more
attractive than before and priced reasonably.

WAHRS
STATE STREET

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE
MAIN STREET

defeat.
Bishop Cannon spoke on Prohibition. He re-
called the old pre-Prohibition days of the saloon;s
he traced the battle he and his rural followers had
made Tor a state Prohibition law in Virginia; he
recalled the fight for national Prohibition; he
remembered his triumph. And finally he -remi-e
nisced on the bitter struggle Al Smith had wagedt
agains the dry cause - in 1920,'24, '26, and '32.t
All of.-this he did a little sadly, wiping his face,
cleaning his eyeglasses, straining himse'lf in hisl
chair --,he did nt stand, It was pathos.t
The bishop offered nQ .solution tp the "after
repeal -what?" question. He even confused the
old issues, He said that- the American govern-
ment Should have appropriated $3,000,000,000, if
necessary;to enforce the 'Eighteenth'Amendment,"
but he never realized tha -such an expenditurec
would have made a balaficed budget impossible.
He said, the states did not help in law enforce-
ment, but he apparently did not wishi to under-
stand (that thosestates which repealed their lo-
cal enforcement acts were states in which the
majority of the people were wet and objected to
dry tyranny. He claimed that the Eighteenth
Amendment-smashed the saloon, but those qf us
who have grown up under the amendment know
that the saloon has merely gone upstairs, or
downstairs, or around ir the alley. He said that,
Michigan went wet by only ten per cent,, but he
used the figures in the November vote, not-the
four-to-one outright vote for repeal last spring."
And he offered not one constructive sugges-
tion' He, was for Prohibition, just as we have
had it, and just as he hoped w(- would have it
again. Even 3.2 beer was too alcoholic for him.
There was no- love, no toleration, no softness of
human nature in Bishop Cannon or his audience.
They were both tough. They were tight-lipped.
They smiled only rarely. They were lean-faced,
hungry, disappointed, beaten. Somehow, looking
at Cannon sitting there in his chair, pounding his
fist and raising his arms, one knew that this man
represented the agrarian poor-white South which
sprang to power after the Civil War and which.
only now is losing control; one knew that it was
this i.ntemperate hate which made people react
against -prohibition as much as any other. single

ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION TICKETS NOW ON SALE

II _____________________ 1_

Daily ClassifiedAds DO pay!

Of one thing they can be assured, the people
of Michigan do not want their school system
crippled for lack of necessary funds.
-The Detroit News.
vs
Collegiate Observer
By BUD BERNARD
Our nominee for the Hall of Fame this week is
A. and M. College of Magnolia, Arkansas for their
excellent sense of humor in selecting such a
suitable and characteristic name for their college
publication. In any college, paper, so 'tis said,
there is no way of escaping from having to "sling
a certain amount of bull," and consequently the
students have found the ideal name with regards
to "bull-slinging." The name of their paper is
The Bray and their trade mark is a jackass.
One of the new freshmen rules at Roanoke
College is that when a freshman speaks to a
co-ed on the campus he must keep both hands
well above his head. Most of the co-eds would
rather his hands went to his pockets once in a
while.
At Stanford University a super-doting parent
wrote to the dean of men requesting that a stu-
dent "who does not smoke, drink or dance," be
assigned to room with his son.

WILL gentleman who took brown re-
versible top-coat by mistake Friday
at 316 Rathskeller notify Daily Box
13. 119

Through the medium of Michigan Daily Class-
ified Ads alone, the above coat was returned to
its owner 24 hours after the first insertion. At a
cost of 33c CLASSIFIED ADS will do the same
for you. They will find your lost articles. They
will rent your vacant room. They will sell your
merchandise. They will perform hundreds of
services.
Call 2-1214 and give us YOUR ad.
Its results will prove its worth.
MICHIGAN DAILY CLASSIFIED ADS

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