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October 12, 1933 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-10-12

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_THE MJCHIGAN DAILY

CHIGAN
Established 1890

DAILY

r --G
- ! t' -i I ..

love story is drawn when she finds another boy
and girl in a similar situation during her Gold
Star trip to Jim's grave in France. Suzanne and
Gary are in an embarrassing situation similar
to Jim and Mary's and again the mother, this
time Mrs. Worth, will not allow them to marry.
Hannah Jessop, of course, has repented her se-
verely Biblical righteousness and aids the two
in finding a happy solution to their dilemma.
Most significant in "Pilgrimage" is the first
Ann Arbor appearance of Heather Angel (her
real name), an extremely pretty and personable
young brunette, in the role of Suzanne, betrayed
girl no. 2.
Most boring are the repetitious sequences in
which the mothers bring to the fore, old griev-
ances and sorrows which are better left untold.
Most Hollywoodish of all his the shoulder-to-
shoulder crying of Hedda Hopper and Henrietta
Crosman near the fadeout.
Added attractions: Moran and Mack struggling
through comedy plot X-3-that of the magician's
house, with sliding doors, belching penguin, and
a newlywed couple, haha; Hearst Metrotone News
with the usual militaristic portrayal of U. S.
troops in Arizona and bombing planes in New
York-along with the gushing voice of the ecstatic
monologist. -G. M. W., Jr.

will be forced to consider, along with Mr. Morley,
whether he has not met the author somewhere.
Mr. Macdonell is, to this reviewer at least, obscure;
there is a certainty that he has never previously
written for general public consumption, under
his own name, at any rate. But there is an equal
certainty that the author is highly skilled at the
sort of work which he has done here. He spec-
ialises in what is known in baseball jargon as
"change of pace." Calm, evenly written irony al-
ternates with high comedy in a fashion that is
delightfully disconcerting. And at the close, there
is a startling bit of symbolism that is telling in its
decisive cloudiness; that is out of tune with the
book, and yet in harmony with it. The whole story,
in fact, is a living paradox, which laughs most
of the distance, but pauses occasionally for brief
reflection.
It is worth the price and more, even if the pur-
chaser reads only the chapter on cricket.
A Washingto
BYSTANDER
.451 is9

CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY

LAUNDRY

Published every morning except Monday during the
University year andSrumm er Session bytheBoard in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
tion a - the Big Ten News Service.
~szo daed &41e ite prQ'
1933 2TIQ~~ALJ A..CVG)13
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively' entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail.
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $3.75; by
mail, $4.25.
Offices; Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2'-1214.
Represetatives:College Publications Representatives,
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylston Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL S rAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR.........THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR .............C. HART SCHAAF
CITY EDITOR.........................BRACKLEY SHAW
SPORTS EDITOR............... ALBERT' H. NEWMAN
WOMEN'S EDITOR..............CAROL J. HANAN
NIGHT EDITORS': A. Ellis Ball, Ralph G. Coulter, Wil-
liam G. Ferris, John C. Healey, E. Jerome Pettit, George
Van Vleck, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara Bates, Elanor Blum,
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret Phalan, Marjorie

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place advertisements with Classified
Advertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
The classified columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advance-11c per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions.
10c per reading line for three or more
insertions.
Minimum 3 lines per insertion.
Telephonemrate-15c per reading line
for one or two insertions.
14c per reading line for three or more
insertions.
10% discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
By contract, per line-2 lines daily, one
month.......................Sc
4 lines E. 0. D., 2 months.........3c
2 lines daily, college year.......7c
4 lines E. 0. D., college year...7c
100 lines used as desired ........ 9c
300 lines used as desired ........8Be
1,000 lines used as desired.......7c
2,000 lines used as desired ........ 6e
The above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per inch.
Ionic type, upper and lower case, Add
6c per line to above rates for all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bold face, upper and lower case. Add
10c per line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 7% point
type.
WANTED
WANTED TO BUY MEN'S OLD AND
new suits and overcoats. Will pay
3, 4, 5, and 8, 9 dollars. Phone Ann
Arbor, 4306, Chicago Buyer. 5x
CANOES FOR RENT
SAUNDERS
Foot of Cedar Street
on Huron River

PERSONAL laundry service. We take
individual interest in the laundry
problems of our customers. Girls'
silks, wools and fine fabrics guar-
anteed. Men's shirts, our specialty.
Call for and deliver. 2-3478, 5594.
611 E. Hoover. 9x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sax darned.
Careful work at low price. 4x
TAXICABS
ARCADE CAB. Dial 6116. Large com-
fortable cabs. Standard rates.2-
2x
WE DO your laundry work for one-
half the usual price. Phone 2-3739.
NOTICE
TAXI-Phone 9000. Seven-passenger
cars. Only standard rates. 1x
INSTRUCTION in original Spanish
and Hawaiian methods for the
guitar. Call 9450. 6:00 - 8:00 p. m.
Lewis Lloyd. 92.
NOTICE - Eleanor's Dressmaking
Shop. 302 S. State St. upstairs.
Coats, suits and dresses made and
remodeled. Prces reasonable. 102
LIRETTE'S shampoo and finger wave
75c every day. Dial 3083. 103

FOR SALE
TENOR banjo and case. Excellent
condition. Reasonable. Phone 3236.
101
FOR SALE: A good Xylophone. Call
22866 or write box i8A, Mich.
Daily.91
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Furnished 1st. floor apt.
for young couple. Also large dou-
ble. 426 E. Washington. Dial 8544.
98
LOST
GIRL who claimed wrong purse at
The Den please return it or call
6944. 95
LOST: Fraternity pin, set with em-
erald and pearls. Reward. Box 10,
Michigan Daily. 34
SOCIETY HOLDS SMOKER
Adelphi speech society held its an-
nual smoker for freshman last night
at which Prof. John Muyskens of
the speech department addressed 20
prospective tryouts on the subject,
"Old and New."
The speaker disclUssedi changing
values of the past and present and
traced the changes in literature,
a st r o n o m y, cheIistry, and art
through the centuries

AT THE WHITNEY
"WHEN STRANGERS MARRY"
TROPIC PASSION; UNDER PAR
Steve Rand ............. Jack Holt
Marian Drake .........Lillian Bond
Hinkle.............Arthur Vinton
Antonia........Barbara Barondess
"When Strangers Marry" begins in Paris and
ends in the tropics of Java in the town of Sara-
bong after much excitement and gun fighting.
Jack Holt, strong ma of the movies, is in
another typical role and Lillian Bond, the English
actress (so they say), in her first lead, does as
well as anyone might have. But the picture lacks
suspense, drama, good direction, and photography.
Micky Mouse goes fishing in his cartoon; Goose
Goslin hits a home run in the news reel, and
Lois Moran dresses up as a man in "No Women
Allowed" in the group of added attractions.
-R. E. L.

SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Donald R. Bird,
Arthur W. Carstens, Sidney Frankel, Marjorie Western.
REPORTERS: Caspar S. Early, Thomas Groehn, Robert
D. Guthrie, Joseph L. Karpinski, Manuel Levin, Irving
F. Levitt, David G. MacDonald, S. Proctor McGeachy,
John O'Connell, George I. Quimby, Floyd Rabe, Mitchell
Raskin, Richard Rome, Adolph Shapiro, Marshall D.
Silverman, L. Wilson Trimmer, William F. Weeks.
WOMEN REPORTERS: Frances Carney, Dorothy Gies,
Jean Hanmer, Florenc.a Harper, Marie Hed, Margaret
Hiscock, Eleanor Johnson, Hilda Lane, Kathleen Mac-
Intyre, Josephine McLean, Marjorie Morrison, Mary
O'Neill, Jane Schneider, Ruth Sonnanstine, Margaret
Spencer.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER...........W. GRAFTON SHARF
CREDIT MANAGER.........BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER.. . Y
.."......... .......... CATHIERINEMHNR
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Fred Her-
trick; Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Contracts, Jack Bellamy; Advertising Service, Robert
Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circulation, Jack Ef-
roymson.
ASSISTANTS: Meigs Bartmess, Willard Cohodas, Van
Dunakin, Carl Fibiger, Milton Kramer, John Mason,
John Marks, John Ogden, Bernard Rosenthal, Joe
Rothbard, Richard Schiff, Robert Trimby, George Wil-
liams, David Winkworth
v5aa
NIGHT EDITOR: E. JEROME PETTIT
They Don't
Fool Here ...
A N OFFICIAL, prominent in Wash-
1Ltenaw County law enforcing
circles, once made the statement: "I don't know
how they treat 'em where you come from; but
we don't fool down here in Washtenaw County."
This statement was made to a transient who was
on trial for a misdemeanor. The man was subse-
quently convicted. The public official was right.
The lion's share of the credit for Washtenaw's
quick apprehension of criminals large and small
must go to Jacob Andres, the county's able sheriff.
He has never yet failed on a case of any moment.
The Ann Arbor police have more than upheld
their end-keeping the city free from elements
breeding organized crime, and seeing that all in-
cidental crime is quickly paid for. These two law
enforcing agencies, along with Ann Arbor's two
justices and Circuit Court Judge George W.
Sample have all done an inestimable service in
keeping Washtenaw County, and in particular
Ann Arbor, free from the stigma of "wide-open."
In recent county history, from the celebrated
torch murders on down to the brutal killing two
days ago of an aged ironworker, this locale has
gone methodically about its business of scotching
crime. The killers of two days ago will get theirs,
too. There will be no appeals, no delays, no
"stays," unless such action is warranted beyond
the shadow of doubt. The killers will get stiff sen-
tences. Washtenaw will not banter with them.
Neither Sheriff Andres, Prosecutor Albert J.
Rapp, Judge Sample, or Chief of Police Lewis Fo-
hey sympathizes with, the stratum of society
which is brave only when armed with machine
guns, bootleg whisky, or binding straps and strong
arms, as was the case two days ago. We should
feel fortunate indeed, that, in an age given to
corruption and bribery of police powers, Ann Ar-
bor is honest, quick, and vigilant.
Screen Reflections
Four stars means extraordinary; three stars edfinitely
recommended; two stars, average; one star, inferior;
no stars, stay away from it.
AT THE MAJESTIC
"PILGRIMAGE"
GRIM STORY OF GOLD STAR MOTHER
Hannah Jessop... Henrietta Crosman
Suzanne ............ Heather Angel
Jim Jessop..........Norman Foster
Mary Saunders....... Marian Nixon
Gary Worth.......Maurice Murphy
Mrs. Worth..........Hedda Hopper
In rating "Pilgrimage" one star, it should be
borne in mind that this picture has an extremely
limited appeal. The stern set of Henrietta Cros-
man's lips, the tragedy which befalls Mary Saun-

About Books

ENGLAND THEIR ENGLAND
A. C. Macdonell
(Macmillan, $2.00)
By JOHN W. PRITCHARD
These Scots! They can laugh at jolly old Eng-
land even more efficiently than can the English.
Futhermore, in their laughter there is not the
concealed bite that one finds in American cri-
tiques of the staid island, or the not-so-well-con-
cealed snap that the English themselves insert.
There is, instead, a sympathetic appreciation that
is bound up in sly dry chortles - chortles that
bound from page to page in a manner that is
nothing short of devastating!
The English are perfectly willing to rip their
nation to pieces (provided that the ripping is
done confidentially between Englishmen), but
they love their island. Mr. Macdonell, a Scot,
does no ripping; he merely laughs, laughs with
his whole body and soul - but he loves England,
too. With one or two notable exceptions, the
entire book is one huge chuckle.
The Story
Perhaps the book is a novel. The names of
principal characters, at any rate, are fictitious.
Donald Cameron, whose nationality is obvious,
makes his origin even more evident by allowing
himself to be blown nearly into the next world
by a shell which explodes near him as he stoops
to retrieve a franc from the bottom of a muddy
trench. This slight peccadillo proves fortunate,
for It is the start of a series of incidents that cause
him to become a free-lance journalist (starting
from scratch), with a side-motive of studing the
obscurities of English social life and writing a
book about them. As a result of several calls upon
London newspaper men of starting personal charc-
teristics, he quickly is introduced into the upper
circle of English life.
The people he meets proves more and more inex-
plicable to him as his acquaintance broadens. The
dominating figure - a sort of Duchess of Wrexe -
is Lady Ormerode, who has an ambition to cap her
series of munificent patronages by giving money
to "do up the Stones in that Henge of theirs that
they're always talking about." Others include Es-
meralda d'Avenant, nee Jukes (she is-unmarried),
a cinema actress who mistakes Donald for a film
magnate and conducts herself accordingly; Miss
Perugia Gaukrodger, whose novels "were mostly
about suppressed desires, and were written in a
style that made even the simplest of actions seem
perfect monstrosities of abnormality;" Patience
Ormerode, sister of the countess, who "had no
topic of conversation and only one adjective at a
time. At the moment the adjective was grisly';"
an American lady by the name of Mrs. Poop,
whose husband dominated the stockbroking firm
of O. K. Poop and Artaxerxes Tintinfass, Inc.;
and Rupert Harcourt, the poet, who spends most
of his time shocking the other members of the
party because he is the only human being pres-
ent. Sample shock, delivered as Miss d'Avenant
retires and directs her steps toward bed; "I wish
someone would tell me if this is the sort of week-
end party where I offer to come with you."
Donald, in the course of the book, manages to
find out almost everything about English customs
except a reason for them. He takes part in a
cricket game, and has his ideas of cricket seriously
revised. He acts as secretary to a delegate to the
League of Nations convention at Geneva, see
British diplomacy do practically what it will, but
is unable to discover just how the manipulation
is accomplished amid a perfect stew of transparent
stupidity. He attends a game of rugger between
Oxford and Cambridge, in company with 60,000
other spectators who cheer madly in a drenching
rain; a few days later he and 4,000 others silently

By KIRKE SIMPSON
WASHINGTON, Oct. 6-Indiana not being one
of the 35 states to elect a governor next year,
the Chicago republican sound-off of former Sena-
tor Jim Watson was given quite a different mean-
ing on the political front than otherwise might
have been the case.
There are conditions in Indiana, by all accounts,
which might make it especially attractive to re-
publican eyes. A good, smashing republican gu-
bernatorial victory there in 1934 might go far
toward indicating where the party is to turn for
a presidential candidate two years later.
GOVERNOR PAUL McNUTT, democrat, is in
the saddle in Indiana until 1937. However
hopeful republican Indianans may be of beating
him or any other democrat then - and they are
hopeful - it is a post-1936 matter.
If there is to be a republican dark horse for 1936
groomed as a governor next year to break the
speculation market, some other state must trot
him out.
MUST FACE FIRE
DEMOCRATIC governors will be exposed to
attack next year as never before. Twenty-six
of the 35 governors whose terms expire are demo-
crats. Half of them, to be sure, are from congen-
itally democratic states, the south and southwest.
That leaves 13 as special republican targets in
usually republican or always doubtful surround-
ings.
Aside from the big eastern contests in New York,
New Jersey and Massachusetts, the interior offers
attractive opportunities for republican 1934 spade
work. Ohio, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri and
Nebraska presumably will have democratic gov-
ernors seeking re-election. All are proven terri-
tory for launching presidential booms.
Republican party history may well hinge on
what happens to one or the other of those 13
democratic governors next year. Every contest
will be worth watching for the politically minded.
SOLUTION BY STARVING
T He patronage snarl reached a point for the
White House in October where novel plans to
clear it up were in order.
One proposal was that all available jobs and all
politically important demands for them be listed.
There are many more demands than jobs. The
idea was to sit Chief Patronage Dispenser Jim
Farley and Presidential Secretary Louis Howe
down behind locked doors to put the jigsaw puz-
zle together - and not let them out, even for food
until they did.
Collegiate Observer
By BUD BERNARD
A Peanut penalty is levied upon members of
the physics department at the University of In-
diana who are tardy or who are absent without
an acceptable excuse. A member who commits
either of these crimes must treat the club to a
pound of peanuts.
Just think of the circus atmosphere that would
be created if many members were delinquent at
any single meeting. And we suppose that mem-
bers of the physics club are of college age and
mentality!
The two big honorary clubs on the Univer-
sity of Oklahoma campus are called the Ruf
Necks, and the Jazz Hounds.
Add this to your list of definitions -"A gen-
tleman farmer is one who loses money he has in
the bank --not money the bank has in him."
- Daily Cardinal
SO THEY SAY
"Louisiana was considered a bargain from
the French until Huey Long happened along
to cast a shadow of doubt."
- Ohio State Journal
"There are three types of men that go to
college today: those who are willing to be
educated, those who want to be educated, and
those who are determined to be educated."
-Newton D. Baker
Michigan's rushing chairmen may find some

doubtful satisfaction in the fact that the eight
nationals at Beloit College pledged the grand
total of thirty-four men.
The sale of beer has been prohibited on
Northwestern University's campus. Which
calls for the old slug about "misery likes
company."

-

JOE PARKER

ARBOR INN
Michigan Road
3 Miles East of Ypsilanti
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100 ENVELOPES
Printed with Name, Address, Town
$1,

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time-

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14 Nickels Arcade
225 East Liberty Street

500 SHEETS
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The Mayer-Schairer Coo
Stationers, Printers, Binders, Office Outfitters
112 South Main Street Phone 4515

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Formals -Long and Slinky - Sophisticated
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CREPES

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All the new high shades for Mid-Winter
Black -'white

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