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October 10, 1933 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1933

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pt

I

Races Open At
Fair Grounds
Track Tonight
Some of the most prominent trot-
ters and pacers in Michigan ,will
show their wares tonight when the
Night Harness Races open at the
Ann ArborFair Grounds.
Three races are scheduled: a 2.27
pace, a 2.22 pace, and a 2.24 trot.
The first race will begin at 7:45 p.m.;
the gates will be open at 7 p.m.
Probably the most famous horse
entered is Calvin May. Calvin May
is a pacer with a record of 2:031/4
and is owned by Crandal and Barton.
This horse lowered the track record
at Jackson, Michigan, pacing at
2:07%/ this year and has won every
start in Michigan except two in
which she finished second.
Shows Good Record
Diamond Dewey, a trotter, is an-
other outstanding entry, having come
in first or second in every start this
year. This horse is owned by Burt
Roach of Lansing, Michigan.
G e o r g e Lancaster, of Clinton,
Michigan, has a good horse in Harry'
Brooks. His record is 2:10. During
the past two years Harry Brooks has
been a very successful campaigner,
taking first or second in practically
every race.
Record Breaker
Deep Run Tod, another fine pacer,
has a record of 2:09/4. Mrs. Frank
L. Pierce of Detroit is the ow ter.
This three year old colt won the
Michigan Futurity at Hillsdale last
week and was driven by Mrs. Pierce
herself. Incidentally Mrs. Pierce
drove this horse as a two year old
at Adrian and set a world record of
2:18 for lady drivers with a two year
old hopple pacer over a half mile
track.
INSIST on
CAVALIER
PALE DRY GINGER ALE
and LIME RICKEY,
the only FULL Quart, 32-oz. @ 15c
(Plus 5c Bottle Deposit)
SOLD AT'OUR FAVORITE STORE

Saturday's Scores
Show Near-Upsets
For Favored Teams
By DON BIRD
Upsets are beginning to take their
toll of football teams in the coun-
try that figured in the pre-season
favored positions. The outcome of
last Saturday's contests provided
more specific proof of this fact with
the downfalls and near-upsets of sev-
eral outfits previously considered in
the upper section.'
Notre Dame narrowly scaped a ca-
tastrophe in its game with Kansas,
and the escape came only in the
form of a scoreless tie. Twice in that
game the Jayhawkers put the ball
on the Irish 10-yard line, but lacked
that extra something to score. The
Notre Dame team was not bad but
Kansas was better, and some inten-
sive defensive drill is on Hunk An-
derson's order list this week.
Heavy Line Wavers
The defeat of New York U by a
light but determined West Virginia
Wesleyan team to the tune of 3-0
was an upset that would make al-
most any coach blush. New York
has the heaviest line in its history,
but the southern Bobcats held their
own until an opportunity for a drop-
kick was utilized for the lone score.
One more major upset was the de-
feat of Texas Christian by Laforge,
13-0.
The spotlight of the near-upsets
is held jointly by Indiana and Min-
nesota. Although the Gophers out-
played the Hoosiers, a series of bad
breaks on both sides prevented a
score. Each is now a comparative
unknown to its next opponnt.
Favorites Clash Saturday
The game between Indiana and
Notre Dame this Saturday will be
somewhat unique in that each team
gained a scoreless tie last week-and
had to fight to do it. Minnesota
meets the Purdue team that put up
a weak offense against Ohio Univer-
sity for a 13-6 score.

Petoskey Works
On Passing In
Monday's Drill
Kipke May Use Star End
At Full In Attempt To
Bolster Aerial Attack
The question of which four men
will be in Michigan's starting back-f
field in the important games this
fall was farther from a solution than
ever yesterday after Coach Kipke1
started Ted Petoskey, All-American
end, working with the backs.
Evidently disappointed in the pass-
ing attack shown by the Varsity
against State Saturday, when Ren-
ner's highly touted heaves failed to'
connect by wide margins, Kipke hasc
selected the versatile end as a possi-
ble solution to his problem and had
him throwing passes all afternoon. '
Passes Are Good
Petoskey's throws had plenty of
distance and were becoming surpris-
ingly accurate toward the end of the
workout when he was teaming with
a second string backfiell in execut-
ing pass plays.
With Renner's stock reaching a
new low after Saturday's showing,
Johnny Regeczi, who has been re-
garded as a potential passing threat
all season, worked with a -veteran
backfield of Fay at quarter and
Westover and Heston at the halves
in working on aerial plays, also.
If Petoskey is used at fullback, as
he probably will be if he plays in the
backfield at all, it will improve the
team's defensive power but may mean
the benching of either Everhardus
or Heston, since Fay appears to be
an almost certain starter at quarter
and Regeczi's punting is sufficient to
earn him a starting position,
Putting Petoskey in the backfield
would not materially weaken the end
positions since Kipke has three capa-
ble flankers in Ward, Chapman and
Malashevich.
Kipke spent the entire session in
developing the team's offense. While
he stressed passing, he put the
guards through a long drill in com-
ing out of the line to furnish inter-
ference for the ball carriers, a de-
partment in which they appeared
weak during the last three quarters
of Saturday's game.
NEWMAN SCORES ON LONG RUN
After a spectacular run of- more
than 90 yards, Harry Newman, Mich-
igan's All-American quarterback in
1933, failed to make good on the
extra point and thus lost the game.
Newman, after losing 10 yards on a
flubbed lateral play, reversed his
field and ran 90 yards for the Giants
final touchdown to make the final
score Boston 21, New York 20.

PLAY'

& BY-PLAY

-By AL NEWMAN
Grind The Axes!.. .*
***

BEGINNING WITH THE FINAL
GUN of Saturday's combination
swimming meet and football game,
there has been a persistent under-
current of noise beneath the usual
extraneous collection of minor and
major hubbubs which make life in
Ann Arbor interesting but difficult at
times. This persistent note is the
noise of many, many people grinding'
axes, and by this ye may know that
the open season on Drug Store
Coaching has arrived.
It seemed after the game that I
could not turn in my tracks without
some gent inquiring what I thought
of the game. To all of which I re-
plied, "Fairly satisfactory under the
circumstances." Then I would watch
the fellow leap at least five (5) feet
(ft.) in the air, swallow his false
teeth if any, and tear his hair if
any. He would come down to terra
firma in the due course of events, his
eyes practically glazed with emotion,
and paw the air for some time for
sheer lack of articulation.
Finally, he would break out into
horrible curses about Michigan's
team, Michigan's Coach Kipke,
Michigan's system, and wind up with
a final Grand Imprecation upon any
blanked sports editor who would not
leap into the air along with him and
tear his hair at the mere thought of
Saturday's game.
All of which somehow gave me the
idea that these guys were somewhat
displeased with the exhibition.
* * *
THIS BRINGS UP THE QUES-
TION of just what Michigan men
expect from Michigan's football
team, and I was able to gather that
the score should have been at least
eighty to nothing, and that all three
of Michigan's scores were pure un-
adulterated good fortune, that the
Wolverine eleven should have com-
pleted upwards of twenty passes and
held the Spartans to a negative
yardage. Incidentally, these same
gents were standing upon their hind
legs and lustily attempting to ruin
their vocal cords after Michigan had
scored the twentieth point. The Wol-
verines were just world-beaters.
I might remind these people that
Michigan State is not renowned as a
set-up; their national ranking last
year was fourteen in the same rating
which gave the Wolverines second
place in the country. Their line from
one end to the opposite tackle is
heavy, veteran, and aggressive. Their
passing attack is decidedly above the
average, and their running attack is
likewise.
Understand that I am not positive-
ly frothing at the mouth with de-

light, but it seems to me that a wet
field may have had something to do
with the display of football. Also
the fact that none of these tricky lit-
tle ground-gaining plays were pulled
out of the bag by the Maize and
Blue. In fact, there was nothing
used but straight football. That
brings down the Michigan system to
nothing but Punt and Pray.
The guards were failing to pull out
of the line fast enough during the
second half as they ran interference
for the backs, who piled into their
interference and slipped on the field
which, with much treading, was
growing very slippery. The guards
failed to pull out for the same rea-
son. They were a bit tired, and it
would have taken a magician to pull
out of the line fast in that mud.
And again consider that Michi-
gan's team has practiced intensively
for three weeks, and both Dr. Lynam
and Coach Hoyt, judges of condition,
seemed to think before the game that
the boys were just a bit run out and
over-conditioned. They certainly
semed to lack that snap which means
getting the jump on the other fel-
low during. the second half. And
that same speed means more on a
wet field than on a dry one, because
if you are out-charged in the mud,
it usually means that you wind up
sitting around in the wet and watch-
ing the rest of the play go through
with a somewhat impersonal inter-
est.
All this will undoubtedly bring tor-
rents of abuse upon my had, but I
just had to write something as a jus-
tification for my characterization of
the game as "fairly satisfactory un-
der the circumstances." What's more
I still think so.

II

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including Beverage and Dessert
COMPLETE EVENING DINNERS
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One puff of BRIGGS tells why it became
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with or without sleeves
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I i- - ----________-- .<<

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
for
AN OFFICIAL RECORD
OF CAMPUS ACTIVITY

$7.50
WALK A FEW STEPS
AND SAVE DOLLARS
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YOUNG MEN'S SHOP
116 East Liberty St.

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i

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