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October 07, 1933 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-10-07

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, OCT. 7, 1933

PAGE SIX SATUUDAY, OCT. 7, 1933

YESTERDAY
LONDON-The British government
will not resume full payment of the
war debts, it was learned. "Token"
payments or a lump settlement would
be offered as alternatives.
HARRISBURG, Ill.-Nineteen per-
sons were shot in a raid by picketeers
on Peabody Mine No. 43.
HAVANA-A plea for support of
the new government was voiced by
leaders today after a conference
which was attended by U. S. Ambas-
sador Sumner Welles.
NEW YORK-John D. Rockefeller;
Jr., called for government sale of
liquor when the Eighteenth Amend-
ment is repealed. He said that the
profit motive in private sale would
defeat the. aim of the repeal move-
ment.
Dorothy Sands,
Impersonator,
Highly Praised
Performance Here Will Be
A Complete Review Of
The American Theatre

Detroit Alumni
Will Entertain
Twelve Seniors
Tapping, Anderson And
Watkins Also Invited To
Attend Banquet
In accordance with its annual cus-
tom of contacting campus leaders,
the student relations committee of
the University of Michigan Club of
Detroit will entertain 12 students at
a dinner Thursday, Oct. 19, at the
University Club in Detroit.
George C. Dillman, former Varsity
baseball captain and shortstop, who
is chairman of the committee, has
planned a program of entertainment
for the seniors who are to be in-
vited.
The three faculty representatives
who are to accompany the men into
Detroit are T. Hawley Tapping, gen-
eral secretary of the Alumni Asso-
ciation, Prof. H. C. Anderson, mem-
ber of the Board in Control of Phys-
ical Education, and Herbert C. Wat-
kins, assistant secretary of the Uni-
versity and business manager of the
Varsity Band.
Report Normal
Enrollment In
B. Ad. School
The enrollment to date in the
School of Business Administration is
within one or two of the number en-
rolled at this time last year, Dean
Clare E. Griffin said yesterday. While
the exact figures were not available,
the number of students taking
courses in business is slightly over
100. The number of students coming
into the school on the combined let-
ters and business curriculum has
dropped slightly as compared with
the figures of last year, Dean Grif-
fin said.
A possible cause for the drop in
the number of students entering on
the combined curriculum is the fact
that students with no prospect of a
job after leaving college find it more
to their liking to continue on in col-
lege as long as possible In contrast
to this is the fact. that parents have
found it harder and harder to supply
the necessary funds to enable their
children to stay in school. The fig-
ures, however, show that more and
more students are staying in college
an extra year, Dean Griffin said.
Union To Organize
New Student Clubs

Thousands Of State Rooters
Here For Annual Game Today

By CHARLES A. BAIRD
Thousands of Michigan State fol-
lowers will swarm into Ann Arbor to-
day for the annual battle ,of the
Spartans and Wolverines. All high-
ways between here and East Lansing
will be crowded with State rooters,
utilizing all means of transportation.
Several buses have been chartered by
dormitories and other groups, and
hundreds of hitch-hikers are already
on their way.t
Six thousand tickets have been re-
served by Michigan State students'
and faculty members alone, and the.
entire east side of the Stadium has
been set aside for State followers.
. The Michigan game has always

been the highlight of the M. S. C.
schedule. Students make plans for
the annual October trek to this cam-
pus weeks in advance, and for days
following it stories of the event are
told and retold.
The vanguard of State students
arrived in Ann Arbor Friday after-
noon and evening, prepared to make
a big week-end of it. Dormitories,
fraternities, and sororities were filled
to capacity with East Lansing visitors
The band will come to town at 10
a. m. today and soon afterward the
largest contingent of followers will
arrive. Saturday morning classes at
State will be dismissed early for the
convenience of those making the trip.

Dorothy Sands, impersonator who
will open the Oratorical Association
lecture series Nov. 1, is not only a
brilliant mimic, but knows the back-
ground of the theatre as well and is
perfectly equipped to present such a
"one-woman show" as she will offer
here, according to Prof. O. J. Camp-
bell of the English department.
Miss Sands' performance here will
be a complete review of the history
of the American theatre, and the ac-
tress will present the climax scenes
of a number of prominent plays in
costume, impersonating the. leading
actress in each case.
Professor Campbell, who saw Miss
Sands in Tchekov's "The Sea Gull,"
is very enthusiastic about her work
and considers her an intelligent ac-
tress. Not content with mere acting
ability, he said, she has studied the
history of the drama extensively, and
consequently she can impersonate
starts from before her time as well
as 'those she has seen.
A graduate of Radcliffe College,
Miss Sands wrote, directed, and ap-
peared in many amateur productions
while there. After leaving school she
played a number of small roles in
Broadway plays.
It was not until she appeared in
various editions of the "Grand Street
Follies," however, that she quickly
began to win prominence as a bril-
liant impersonator and caricaturist.
Later, in her own show, "Styles in
Acting," Miss Sands toured the coun-
try. Drawing on melodrama, rural
and frontier plays, minstrel shows,
burlesque, and the most recent of the
native dramas, she soon gained her
present high repute as a mimic and
authority on$ stage history. ,
Dr. A. C. Cole, '07
Writes Third Book
Dr. A. C. Cole, '07, now professor
of history in the graduate school of
Western Reserve University, has just
written his third book, "The Irre-
pressible Conflict," which will be pub-
lished in December by the MacMillan
Co.
This book deals with the history of
the Civil War and the period from
1850 to 1865. Dr. Cole is also the
author of "The Whig Party in the
South" and "The Era of the Civil
War," and, in addition to his pro-
fessorial work at Western Reserve, is
the editor of the Mississippi His-
torical Review.
KLOETZEL GETS AWARD
A scholarship of $200 was awarded
to Milton Kloetzel, '34, yesterday
'afternoon. The reward came from the
Paul F. Bagley Scholarship Fund,
which is used each year for the bene-
fit of the most promising and worthy
student in chemistry.

Angell, Smith
Present PlIa n
To Legislature
Will End Bootlegging By
Governmental C o n t r o 1
And Taxation Of Liquor
(Continued from Page 1)
uor in the third class, he said, would
be valid only at the nearest liquor
store. In this way, there will be a
responsible man at the store who will
be in a position to keep track of
the consumers in his district.
The proposed plan would provide
for local option, in the sense stated
that the community may refuse to
grant licenses, Professor Angell de-
clared. If the community did not
want to issue permits it may refuse,
he pointed out; however there would
be no law governing the importation
of liquor from "wet" communities.
Local restrictions would not prevent
the use of consumer cards in the
"dry" localities, as the consumer
would be permitted to buy from his
nearest store.
As to taxation, the plan would levy*
higher taxes on Group Three than
on Group One. However, the tax
would not be so heavy that it would
foster bootlegging. The proposals
hope to do away with bootlegging
entirely, and by lowering costs to
such a level bootlegging would be-
come unprofitable. Also, the plan
would prohibit any advertising of
beverages in Group Three.
"The plan, after all," Professor
Angell explained, "is to deal with liq-
uor control from a social welfare
point of view. The plan aims to en-
courage the consumption of the low-
er alcoholic liquors, and to discour-
age the use of more spirited bever-
ages."

Fall Games Held On
Homecoming Day
(Continued from Page 1)
games will be offered by that body,
and his stand was echoed by leaders
in all prominent campus organiza-
tions.
Leaders for the two classes will be
chosen, and organization effected, at
class caucuses which Owen Crum-
packer, '35, in general charge of the
games for the Union, said yesterday
would be held about Oct. 17. At these
meetings of the men of the two
classes their "battle orders" will be
issued and general plans for the cam-
paign against their rivals will be
formulated. I
Leaders stressed the fact that par-
ticipation in these games by mem-
bers of both classes is one of the out-
standing events of undergraduate
years, and upon this they based their
belief that this year will find an even
greater rivalry existent and a more
enthusiastic turnout for the sched-
uled tests to determine class super-
iority.

Roberts Lauds
Indian Customs
And Cvilization
Says White Man's Duty Is
To Educate Indians In
The Existing Order
"Our country might profit greatly
from a study of Indian civilization,"
declared the Rt. Rev. W. Blair Rob-
erts, Bishop of South Dakota, in his
address which featured the Ann Ar-
bor Episcopal Regional Conference
held yesterday at Harris Hall under
the auspices of St. Andrews Church.
Bishop Roberts, who as missionary
bishop of South Dakota is the in-
timate friend and counsellor of more
than 5,000 reservation Indians, spoke
on "The Scope of .the Church's En-
terprise."1
The Ann Arbor region includes all
southwestern Michigan except De-
troit. The Rev. Henry Lewis, rector
of St. Andrews, was in general charge
of the conference. In addition to
Bishop Roberts, other church dig-
nitaries in attendance were the Rt.
Rev. Herman Page, Bishop of Mich-
igan, and Charles O. Ford, executive
secretary of the Michigan diocese.
Bishop Roberts, in his address,
stressed the type of work which the
Episcopal church. is doing among the
Sioux Indians of South Dakota. He
considers it "the white man's duty
to educate the Indian to enter the
complicated society which the white
has forced upon him."
To this end, under his direction,
the church is turning its efforts. Spe-
cial emphasis is placed on making
the Indian self-supporting by teach-
ing him a vocation in the trades
school. According to Bishop Roberts,
it is more important that a man learn
some definite trade than that he ac-
quire a vague assortment of knowl-
edge.

LOST
LOST: Notebook and Gas Analysis
Text. Place, Ferry Field; Tuesday
at five. Phone 3209. R. M. Waters.
81
LOST-Brown billfold Thursday, Hill
or Church Street. Personal cards,
bills. Reward. L. F. Richards, Phone
2-2513. 84
LOST-In Angell Hall. Ilarge cut
green ring surrounded by pearls.
Please call 7117. 85
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-One double room and
suites with cooking privileges. In
desirable location. 429 S. Division.
86
HELP WANTED
CAN PLACE a few students on de-
sired part time work. Apply 609
Packard. 76
TAXICABS
ARCADE'CAB. Dial 6116. Large com-
fortable cabs. Standard rates.
2x
BOARD
BOARD for Jewish students. Deli-
cious home cooking. Special chick-
en dinner, 50c. 611 E. Hoover. Ph.
2-3478. 31

CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY

1

LAUNDRIES carefully d o n e and
hand mended, satisfaction guar-
anteed. Called for and delivered.
Telephone 730F4. 1780 So., State
St. 79
WE DO your laundry work for one-
half the usual price. Phone 2-3739.
8x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 4x
LAUNDRY wanted. Silks, wools
guaranteed. Quick service. Call for
and deliver. 611 E. Hoover. Phone
5594. 32
Clip Coupon For Free
Football Game Tickets
Entries to Goldman Brothers'
"Lucky 13" contest for free tickets to
the Michigan-Northwestern game,
Nov. 25 at Evanston, can be obtained
only by means of the coupon which
is printed daily on Page 3 of The
Michigan Daily. No other paper has
been commissioned by Goldman's to
print these coupons.
The final results of the contest de-
scribed in detail in the coupon, on
Page three will be announced Nov.
21. The Undergraduate Council is su-
pervising the running of the contest.

J

~i

*1

NOTICE

LAUNDRY

TAXI-Phone 9000. Seven-passenger
cars. Only standard rates. 1x

WANTED

WANTED TO BUY MEN'S OLD AND
new suits and overcoats. Will pay
3, 4, 5, and 8, 9 dollars. Phone Ann
Arbor, 4306, Chicago Buyer. 5x
WANTED: Students laundry. Good
work. Very reasonable. Mending
free. Will call for and deliver.
Dial 4929. 83

MICH IGAND ECORATIONS
The best and most complete stock in the city of MICHIGAN BANNERS,
BLANKETS, PENNANTS, BOOKENDS, PLAQUES-

Also an attractive; line of Michigan Jewelry.

AT

WAHR'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

316 STATE STREET

Formation of plans for the estab-
lishment of clubs for men students
according to geographical areas is
now in process at the Union.
For the purpose of acquainting
students from the same sections or
localities, groups from Wisconsin,
Iowa, and the southern states are now
being organized. Also planned are
clubs for alumni of various prepara-
tory schools common at the Univer-
sity, such as Culver, St. Johns, and
Lake Forest academies.
There will be general get-togethers
and special luncheon meetings at the
Union for members of these groups.
Any students interested in joining
these activities are asked to report
to the co-operative committee at the
student offices in the Union.

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MtsgI.tseIag Fteoe.,mity Jewler,
Detroit, Michigan & Wallerville, Ontario
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Ann Arbor Store
A 603 Church St.
FRANK OAKES . Mg r.

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