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October 09, 1932 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-10-09

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, OCT. 9, 1932

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, OCT. 9, 1932

Sinologist Links
Natural Science
With Art Study

U. S. Army Chief Of Staff Meets King Carol

Museum Curator
Scientific Trend
In Art Research

Notes
Taken

Photo Test Is Used
Conducts Work In Study
Of Celadon Specimens
From Far East
Contrary to general belief, the
study of art and natural science have
much in common, according to Ben-
jamin March, sinologist. Mr. March,
who divides his time between the po-
sitions of curator of the Division of
the Orient in the University Museum
of Anthropology and curatory of as-
iatic art at the Detroit Institute of
Art, has discovered this from his own
rather unusual combination of work.
"Once the particular province of
the vague esthete, art history is tak-
ing a definite scientific turn," Mr.
March said in an interview. "Re-I
search is carried out in a scientific
spirit, often requiring historical and
even chemical analysis."
Mr. March has been an honorary
member of the museums staff for
four years. This, however, is his
first year of active work. At present
he is devoting his time here to the
development of objective methods for
classifying Chinese art, especially of
porcelains brought back by Dr. Carl
E. Guthe, also of the museums, from
the Philippines in 1922. He is mak-
ing physical tests of hardness and
also attempting to develop criteria of
glaze texture by photographic means.
Mr. March's more particular study
is devoted to specimens of the cela-
don, a gray-green porcelain popular
in China from the eighth century to
the present day, and probably reach-
ing its"heighth in the twelfth and
thirteenth centuries. Remains of ce-
ladon found in the near East, Tur-
key, Persia, and Egypt, as well as in
the Philippines, serve to show how
far-flung was Chinese commerce,
since ethnologists now agree that all
celadon was produced in China. Silk
and celadon were ancient China's
chief e x p o r t s, according to Mr.
March.
Four years residence in China,
from 1923 to 1927, and a special re-
search trip to the Orient in 1931
under the auspices of the American
Council of Learned Societies, serve as
a back ground to 'Mr. March's pres-
ent work.
A gain of 52 students over last
year's enrollment is reported by thel
University of Florida.

Crusaders To
Open Victoriy
Fund Campatiign
Depend On 'Pocket-ook
Interest' Of Citizens To
Put Campaign Over
CLEVELAND, Oct. 8-- Men and
women want jobs. They want, to
retain their homes. They want low-
ered taxes. They want money to
spend.
This "pocket-book i n t e r e s t" of
American citizens is dealing the final
blow to prohibition,
The Crusaders' national comman-
der-in-chief, Fred G. Clark, in pre-
paring for the, opening of the Vic-
tory Fund Campaign for $500,000
October 10, revealed the results of a
survey of the more than 90 Crusad-
er battalions in the country, the most
important fact of which is the link-
ing of repeal with the return of some,
degree of prosperity in the minds of
increasing numbers of voters.
"Those who study the history of
prohibition since 1920 and the sta-
tistics on drinking and the money
spent for drink annually cannot help
but come to the same conclusion:
that (1) the greatest single indus-
try in the United States produces
no federal income by way of taxes;
(2) this means a heavy added bur-
den on tax payers; (3) while millions
are unemployed and many losing
their homes, bootleggers continue to
line their pockets with gold; and (4)
repeal and the subsequent estab-
lishment in the various states of
liquor control that will protect those
who wish to remain dry is the mostJ
important immediate step available
in the return of prosperity," said
Clark.
"The legitimate taxin gof spirits
and beer, based on the 1917 con-
sumption which was relatively small
because of the war, and of wine, on'
the estimated minimum consuump-
tion of 1931, would produce more
than $1,500,000,000 in tax revenue.
'This would be sufficient to pay the
interest on the bonded indebtedness
of the federal, state, county and
municipal governments and leave a
$200,000,000 balance.
"Relief of the tax burden is un-
questionably the most important fac-
tor in bringing about a new pros-
perity.".
The Crusaders are sure of gaining
a majority of wet members of Con-
gress in the lower house in the com-
ing elections, Clark said.

Economists Can't Stop
Lawnnowers' Putt-Putt
EVANSTON, Ill., Oct. 8.-Eco-
nomic theorizing on the North-
western campus suffered a hu-
miliating set-back today at the
hands of a determined lawn
mower operator. Approaching the
rostrum to deliver his lecture to
an eagerly waiting group of eco-
nomic students, an eminent pro-
fessor of the University became
aware of the steady putt-putt of
a law mower, the staccato efforts
of which effectually drowned out
his comparatively puny vocal
efforts.
A husky individual was depu-
tized to silence the offender. The
noise ceased a moment and then
cheerfully continued. Amid the
cheers of the class another com-
mittee of reconciliation was leav-
ing to enter into negotiations
when the first crusader returned.
In answer to the baffled profes-
sors appealing look he announced,
"he says you economists have
stopped enough machines, but
you can't stop his.

Michigan Alumni Association

Few pe
that the
tion oper
facilities:
out any1
This b
in Octobe
only of
ulty, but
any onei
The bu
ing rapit
Many d
may be
through
Independ
ed tours
tion with
or hotel
Arrangen
and a p
features.
Sincei
S. Rand
couragin
travel, t]

Arranges Trips World Over
eople are aware of the fact prominent townspeople and members
Michigan Alumni Associa- of the faculty. Among these are Prof.
and Mrs. Orlando W. Stephenson,
rates a travel bureau with Dr. and Mrs. Vernon L. Hart, Prof.
for arranging trips through- and Mrs. Herbert D. Calvery, Prof.
part of the world. and Mrs. Hugo P. Thieme, Prof.
ureau, which was organized Eunice Wead, Mr. and Mrs. Walter
er, 1931, is at the service not A. Donnelly, Prof. William Clark
students, alumni, and fac- Trow and family, Prof. Dudley M.
may also be employed by Phelps, Prof. Arthur L. Dunham,
else desiring to travel. Prof. and Mrs. Benjamin F. Bailey,
ureau has grown with amaz- and Dr. A. Luvern Hays.
dity since its organization.
diversified accommodations Jewish Students Begin
conveniently a r r a n g e d
use of the travel bureau. Annual Service Sunday
lent, educational, or escort-
are organized. In connec- Jewish students on campus will
h these, steamship, railroad, join with Jews the world over in ob-
reservation will be made. serving Yom Kippur, the Day of
ments for baggage insurance Atonement, Monday.
passport service are added Orthodox services will be held in
the Beth Israel synagogue, 538 N.
its organization by Mr. Fred Division Street, with prayers begin-
all for the purpose of en- ning at 6:00 a. m. on Sunday, Atone-
g and promoting educational ment Eve and at 8:00 p. m. on Mon-
he bureau has served many day, the Day of Atonement.

(Associated Press Photo)
Gen. Douglas MacArthur, United States army chief of staff, who
made a tour of central European countries, was greeted by King Carol
of Rumania when he arrived in Bucharest. The king later bestowed
upon him the grand cross of the Rumania order of the star.

Future Wallpaper
To Be Made From
Photos, Predicted
Tomorrow's ultra-smart pent-house
will feature huge photographic treat-
ments of contemporary subjects ap-
plied, as wall paper panelling to re-
place the chromium-suede effect so
pronounced at present, according to
the latest plans of the American
Painters and Photographers Associa-
tion which is sponsoring an exhibit
at Alumni Memorial Hall opening
Oct. 10 and lasting two weeks.
The exhibit, which was organized
and first shown at the Museum of
Modern Art in New York, will in-
clude post-war subjects in murals by
the foremost American painters and
camera artists.
Wide-spread comment and some
criticism has been drawn by the un-
usual nature of the exhibit. The 11
photo-murals revealing the ability
ofI a photographer to transform a
bridge, a sky-scraper or a steel plant
into an artistic wall covering aroused
great interest in their first showings.

Get Numerous Lecture
Series Ticket Orders
Mail orders for season tickets to
the 1932-33 lecture series have been
received in exceptionally heavy vol-
ume, it was stated yesterday by the
Oratorical Association..
This was attributed partly to the
distinction of the six speakers en-
gaged, and partly to the move of the
board in control to make prices the'
lowest in the association's existence.
Distinction of mail order tickets
will begin Wednesday and continue
throughout the week. An over-the-
counter sale will be announced later.
-Lowell Thomas, noted author and
historian, will open the lecture series
on Oct. 29 with a travel-talk, "From
Singapore to Mandalay," illustrated
with motion pictures. The association
voluntarily released him from ap-
pearing on2the previously scheduled
date, Oct. 22, so that he might re-
main in New York to be presented
the Legion of Honor.
Twenty-three North Carolina cit-
ies reported no fire loss during Au-
gust.

Plan New Bond
Ssue; Retires
Maturing Notes
Seek $450,000,000 To
Pay Certificates, Interest
On Public Debt
WASHINGTON, Oct. 8-(P)-New
financing operations, putting govern-
ment borrowing for the fiscal year
past the $3,000,000,000 mark, have
been planned by the treasury,
Acting Secretary Ballantine an-
nounced that $450,000,000 of 3 per
cent 41/2 year treasury notes will be
sold Oct. 15. The money will go to
retiring $333,492,000 of maturing
treasury certificates and meeting
$155,000,000 in interest on the public
debt.
This transaction will make a total
of $3,228,570,362 in government bor-
rowings since July 15, and of $1,987,-
000,000 in outstanding securities re-
tired during that period.
Continued low tax receipts was
the explanation advanced for the
new financing. The federal deficit
on Oct. 3, was $404,710,415 and of-
ficials saw little prospect in its ma-
terial reduction for some months.

IF

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