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October 06, 1932 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-10-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Columbia Pape'
Charges Upheld.
By Investigation

Republican Insurgent

Play Production Will Presen t
Elmer Rice's 'Adding Mcichine'

John Jay Dining Hall Is
Found 'Tyrannical' In
Attitude To Employees
New Probe To Start
To See That New Regime
Is Administered Under
Precepts Now In Force
NEW YORK, Oct. 5-Three of five
maladministration charges directed
against John Jay dining hall by the
Columbia Spectator, Columbia Uni-
versity student n e w s p a p e r, last
spring, have been upheld by an in-
vestigation committee composed of
faculty and student members, ac-
cording to the Spectator.
Attacked Dining Hall
Then edited by Reed Harris, stor-
my petrel of university newspaper-
dom, the paper alleged that the din-
ing hall managerial staff "tyran-
nized student employees," that "lack
of co-ordination" regarding to du-
ties and functions was present, that
foreign substances were found in the
food served to the students, that the
halls were run for personal profit,
and that the quality of the food was
unsatisfactory and the prices too
high.
The first three of these charges
were upheld; the last two denied.
Inspection of the investigating
committee of the bank accounts and
income tax returns of two prominent
employees of the dining hall failed
to reveal any appreciable income
"over and above that received from
the university as salary."
Eduard Panchard, food expert, was
summoned by the committee for a
test of the food. Panchard pro-
nounced it satisfactory, and called
the menu "well-balanced." T h a t
foreign substances were present in
the food is admitted, however.
Receive Recommendations
Recommendations for a new re-
gime were advanced by the commit-
tee, which advocated that "more at-
tention be given to the preparation
of foods and ways of serving them,"
and that food-checking and account-
ing systems be inaugurated. Fur-
ther clauses in the report urged med-
ical inspection of employees and that
"to avoid any appearance of favor-
itism, the proportion of students par-
ticipating in inter-collegiate sports
employed in the dining rooms be lim-
ited to the approximate proportion
of such students in the student
.body."
To Consider Report Further
The university commons commit-
tee will organize a group in the near
future which will further consider
the report and will take added ac-
tion, it was announced.
The attacks begun upon John Jay
dining hall attracted nation-wide in-
terest to Harris as the inaugurator
of the crusade. Action finally was
deemed necessary and Harris was
expelled only to be later reinstated.
He then resigned immediately, and
has published a book .entitled "King
Football, the Vulgarization of the
American College."
Y. M. C. A. Celebration
In Honor Of Founding
Observance of the eighty-eighth
anniversary of the founding of the
Young Men's Christian Association is
planned by the local chapter of that
organization for Tuesday night.
Ferdinand N. Menefee, professor of
engineering mechanics, will be in
general charge of plans for an an-
niversary dinner, while Prof. I. L.
Sharfman of the economics depart-
ment will be in charge of tickets and
publicity. . _ ._

"The Adding Machine," Elmer
Rice's noted expressionistic play of
a decade ago, will be the first offer-
ing on the 1932-1933 Michigan dra-
matic season, which begins on Oct.
28, it was announced yesterday by
Valentine B. Windt who will start
his fifth season as director of Play
Production which will stage the play.
Casting and rehearsals have al-
ready begun. The play will be pre-
sented in the Laboratory Theatre
which begins its third year as the
showhouse for the dramatic classes.
"The Adding Machine," one of the
first successful American expression-
istic plays, was first played in New
York in 1923 and enjoyed a highly-s
successful run. Since it has left the
boards it has proved popular with
little theatres, its uniqueness of plot
and setting being looked upon as a
precedent in the American theatre.
The story is a swift and poetic
treatment of the experiences of Mr.
Zero, an office drudge. His life is all
figures interrupted only by the nag-

ging of his wife. He has worked 25
years as a clerk in the office of the
boss who fires him to make way for
the newly-invented adding machine.
In a fit of temporary insanity he
kills the boss and after having given
himself to the police when they call
at his. house and proclaiming his
guilt in court, he is sentenced.
He is transported to the Elysian'
fields where life and characters there
are portrayed through his eyes.
After he has been put to work on
an adding machine and had his soul
cleansed he is ordered task to earth
despite his protests. T is in the
Elysian fields that he learns "the
mark of the slave is upon him" and
that he will commence life over
again and again with that mark.
Tickets for the performance of the
plays will be placed on sale at the
Laboratory theatre .box-office soon.
Tulsa University is operating un-
der the freshman rule in football
I this season for the first time.

Thieves Steal $50
From Sigma Alpha
Epsilon Fraternity
A possible resumption of last
year's epidemic of fraternity house1
robberies was indicated early yes-
terday when the Sigma Alpha Epsi-
lon house, 1408 Washtenaw avenue,
was entered and approximately $50
in cash stolen. It was the second
fraternity robbery of the semester.
According to members of the fra-
ternity, the outer door was left un-
locked and, as sleeping quarters are
in a dormitory on the fourth floor,
the intruders had free access to the
study rooms on the second and third
floors. Nothing else of value was
disturbed.
The first robbery occurred early
last week at the Alpha Tau Omega
house on Cambridge Road, where
$100 was obtained. The situation,
tending to provide ample opportu-
nities for prowlers, was the same as
at the Sigma Alpha Epsilon house,
according to members.
Ann Arbor police advised that all
houses keep their outer doors locked.

Reception For Wilbur
Stanford University graduates and
alumni who are now attending the
University of Michigan were layingj
plans yesterday to organize for the
presentation of a welcome to Ray
Lyman Wilbur, secretary of the in-
terior and president of Stanford, who
will speak here Oct. 13.!
If enough former Stanford stu-
dents are interested in the project,
the alumni plan to give a dinner for
Mr. Wilbur. Organization for the
welcome is being conducted by Daniel
D. Gage, 1207 S. State street, Tele-
phone 2-3369.

Signal Not Observed
Three persons were slightly in-
jured yesterday afternoon in a head-
on collision on U.S.-J12, seven miles
west of Ypsilanti.
The three were Agnes Wroben, 37,
Albert Wroben, 41, and W a l t e r
Kmieecik, 22, all of Detroit, passen-
gers in a car driven by Walter Bas-
tula, 27, of Dearborn. Bastula failed
to observe a flag signal from a steam
chovel operator and struck a truck
driven by Lester McComb, 41, Clin-
ton, officials in the sheriff's office
-aid. The cars met at the top of a
bridge.

ii

Safe!

SUITS AND OVERCOATS

(Associated Press Photo)
Senator George W. Norris, insurg-
ent Republican of Nebraska, will
make a campaign tour in behalf of
the Democratic presidential ticket.
First Woman
Named To Beta
Gamma Sigma
Business Administration
Honor Fraternity Elects
Edith V. Egeland
For the first time in the history
of Beta Gamma Sigma, national
scholastic honorary fraternity of the
School of Business Administration, a
woman has been elected to mem-
bership, it was learned yesterday
from Prof. Ernest M. Fisher. Edith
V. Egeland, '32BAd, has the distinc-
tion of being the only woman mem-
ber of the society.
Miss Egeland, who is employed at
present in the Bureau of Statistics in
the University, was graduated from
the School of. Business Administra-
tion last year at the head of her
class, automatically making her
eligible for membership to Beta
Gamma Sigma, which usually elects
the upper 10 per cent of the graduat-
ing class to membership.
According to Professor Fisher the
unprecedented election of Miss Ege-
land will probably serve as the stim-.
ulus for the future election of other
women who meet the scholastic re- I
quirement of Beta Gamma Sigma.
University Will Offer
Construction Course
A short, intensive course in bitu-
minous materials in road construc-
tion beginning Dec. 15 and continu-
ing through Dec. 24 has been an-
nounced by Prof. W. J. Emmons, as-
sociate professor of transportation
and director of the state highway
laboratories.
The course is similar to those held
in the last two years as a result of
requests from city and county en-
gineers throughout the state for fur-
ther instruction in highway con-
struction.
Mornings will be taken up with
lectures by Professor Emmons on
such subjects as tars, road oils, and
other bituminous road materials. The
afternoons will be taken up with
practical work in the l a b o r a to r y
where Professor Emmons will be as-
sisted by Mr. E. A. Boyd of the labo-
ratory staff.
Finding a man to replace Charlie
Cobb, tackle, will be Coach "Clip-
per" Smith's biggest individual prob-
lem at North Carolina State College
this season.

11

AT BARGAIN PRICES

Make your Food Cost fit your Budget.
Economy Combination Luncheons as low as 20c

Ties! Ties!

Included are Society Brand and other Good Makes;
all the Latest Fall Styles . . . Furnishings 20% less.

Ties!

The Best Porterhouse Steak that money can buy, at 90c

11

SPECIALS

A Wide variety in between-
Breakfast Specials, at . 25c
Also a la Carte

Luncheons, complete, at 35c
Dinners, complete, at. ... 50c

Treneh Coats
$2.85

Suede Jackets
$4.95

The largest and finest selection
of distinctive patterns and col-
ors are offered to you in three
low-priced groups.
New Fall Silks, Crepes,
French Warp Prints, etc.

Costs Less on a Ticket at

11

CHUBB' S

We also have an unlimited supply of FROSH POTS at 39c
WADHAMS & COMPANY

Ann Arbor's Largest Restaurant
Est. 1899
Seven Breakfasts and Seven Dinners on a Ticket.
Six Luncheons and Seven Dinners on a Ticket..

..
..

$4.60
$4.90

205 South Main St.

1st National Bank Bldg.

'!
es aisa ar

AU

La

f

CONCERTS
CHORAL UNION SERIES

25c
Each

Hand-Tailored Twills, Silks,
Persian Failles, etc.
(Silk-backed, pure wool-lined)
NEW SCOTCH PLAIDS

55
2 for $1.00

Heavy Silks, Moires, Twills,
and Italian Grenadines, beau-
tifully hand-tailored with
resilient construction.
$I.oo
THREE LOW-PRICED Rang
Three Low-Priced Ranges
25c -- 55c (2 for $1)l
and $1.00
T i e RA c k
300 B South State
(Near Corner Liberty)

Pointing the way to 'the

advertised

brand

Many a "sale" made by advertising has gone
to a 'competitor because the purchaser did not
know where to buy the advertised brand. Tele-
phone men evolved a plan to make it easy to find.
They created a "Where to Buy It" service in
the classified telephone directory. There-beneath
the advertised trade marks -Buick, Goodrich,
RCA Victor, General Electric and many others
now list authorized local dealers. Thus telephone
men complete the chain between advertiser and
consumer -increase the effectiveness of advertis-
ing - help manufacturers and dealers to increase
sales - help consumers to get what they want!
Because they apply vision to subscribers' prob-
lems, Bell System men continually increase the
value of telephone service.

Oct. 25, BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Conductor. Only Mich-
igan concert of America's premier orchestra
Nov. 2, LAWRENCE TIBBETT
PRINCE OF BARITONES.
Nov. 30, DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
OSSI P GABR ILOWITSCH, Conductor. Only Ann
Arbor appearance this season
Dec. 12, EFREM ZIMBALIST
DISTINGUISHED RUSSIAN ViOLINIST.
Jan. 16, NATHAN M ILSTEI N
SPECTACULAR RUSSIAN-SOVIET VIOLINIST.
In Ann Arbor debut.
Jan. 27, MYRA HESS
Acclaimed "World's foremost woman pianist."
Feb. 8, BUDAPEST STRING QUARTET
Jose Roisman, first violin; Alexander Schneider,
second violin; Stephan lpolyi, viola; Mischa
Schneider, 'cello. Ann Arbor debut of "Europe's
finest quartet."
Feb. 15, SEGRI D ONEGIN
Ann Arbor debut of outstanding contralto, both
in opera and concert.
Mar. 6, VLADIMIR HOROWITZ
Eminent Russian pianist in third Ann Arbor
appearance.
Mar. 15, PADEREWSKI
"King of Pianists" in eighth Ann Arbor concert
during a period of 41 years, beginning Feb. 15,
1893.
Season tickets may be ordered by mail, or orders may be
left at the School'of Music, Maynard street (10 concerts)
$6.00 - $8.00 - $10.00 - $12.00. Please make checks
payable to "University Musical Society" and mail to
Charles A. Sink, President.

;-M -

OKO S

-that were short last week
are NOW ON HAND

-at-

WAHR S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

BELL SYSTEM

316 State Street

A NATION-WIDE SYSTEM OF INTER-CONNECTING TELEPHONES

I

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IV

ICI

GAN

TNI

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AN

J

ES

TIb I (MT1 T ;ad 4. CFHTR A

11

III

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