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October 05, 1932 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-10-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY,

5,

... . .. ,.w

(Associated Press Photo)
Daisy and Violet Hilton, Siamese twins from San Antonio, Tex.,
are Thown in Chicago as they began steps to obtain naturalization
papers. They said England was their birthplace.

Zoologists Makin
Models Of Animals
Found In Michigan
Models of six Michigan animals,
the timber wolf, bobcat, coyote, bad-
ger, woodchuck, and fox, are being
made in the University Museum of
Zoology by the sculpture-taxidermy
method, it was learned yesterday
from H. James Wood, museums pre-
parator.
First introduced by Dr. Carl Ake-
ley of the Field Museum in Chicago,
the method has been widely adopted
by museums because of the greater
accuracy and detail made. possible,
according to Mr. Wood, who is do-
ing the taxidermical work. Carle-
ton W. Angell, University artist, is
the sculptor.
Clay Model Made
Complete measurements of the
carcass are taken, and the leg bones,
pelvis, and skull are also used in
making up the armature, over which
the clay model is constructed, Mr.
Wood said yesterday. From the clay
model a plaster cast is made, and
from that in turn a papier-mache
cast is formed. When properly
pieced togethed, the final result is a
light, hollow manikin, ready to re-
ceive the skin, which has been pre-
pared and tanned in the usual way,
and is stretched over the manikin
and glued in place. This is in dis-
tinct contrast to the common meth-
od of "soft-filling," and makes for a
degree of detail that would not oth-
erwise be. possible, according to Mr.
Wood.
An example of this type of work
is the recently completed model of
the Australian race-horse, Phar Lap,
by James L. Clark, of the American
Museum in New York City.
Part of Series
The animals being modeled by Mr.
Wood and Mr. Angell will probably
be on exhibition in the Museums by
the middle of winter as a part of the
synoptic series of Michigan mam-
mals, it was announced. Small ani-
mals in the series, with the exception
of the badger and woodchuck, will
be done by the old means of soft-
filling. Models of these two will be
done by sculpture-taxidermy because
of their extremely thick skins.
"The clay models of the animals
are not harmed in any way during
the process, and Mr. Angell is plan-
ning on adding additional clay and
finishing them, thus forming a sec-
ond series for the Museum," Mr.
Wood said.
Hoosier Gridders Must
Keep Off Politics, Is Edict
(Big Ten News Service)
BLOOMINGTON, Ind., Oct. 4.-
Making political footballs of issues
is an old practice but making a po-
litical issue of football is something
new. However, the fortunes of the
University of Indiana's football team
and of its other athletic aggregations
are seriously menaced by campus
politics are to be believed.
These protesting g r o u p s claim
there is great danger in the possi-
bility that candidates of rival fac-
tions will be members of the same
team.
Even the coaches have expressed
their willingness to prevent the
threat of politics in the realm of
sport while student opinion has
flared up with indignation at the
possibility of dissension.
Somerset, Ky., celebrated the 55th
anniversary of the first passenger
train running in and out of the city.
Cleveland numbers 16 murders
among its unsolved crimes so far
this year.

College
Beauty Shoppe
300 So. State St.
Announcing Our New
and Reasonable Prices
Sharpoo and
Fingerwave . . . . 75c
Shampoo and Marcel . . $1
Manicure . . . . . 50c
Eyebrow Arch . . . . . 35c
PERMANENTS
Scott's Oil Wave . . . . $4
Frederic's Vita Tonic . . $5
Gabrieleen . . . . . . . $6
Open evenings, Ph. 2-2813

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
7:30 in room 302 of the Michigan
Union. All members are requested to
be present for election of officers.
Harris Hall: Open house at the
Hall this afternoon from four to six.
Tea will be served during the after-
noon. All students cordially welcom-
ed, especially those who are entering
the University for the first time.
Mu Phi Epsilon: Meeting at the
League, Wednesday at 7:30 p. m. All
members urged to be present.
COMING EVENTS
Riding for Women: W.A.A. Riding
Club is holding its first ride on Fri-
day, October 7, at 3:30 p. m. Stu-
dents interested in going please call
Miss Elizabeth Cooper, 3318.
Varsity Debate: Men's Varsity de-
bate tryouts will take place Thurs-
day, October 13, at 1 p. ln. in Room
4003, Angell Hall. Complete infor-
Chicago Drops To
Fifth In Population;
New York Second
NEW YORK, Oct. 4.-'OP)-The of-
ficial and unofficial standings in the
population race of the world's great
cities were upset in the last week
by new totals announced from New
York and Tokio.
New York's unofficial metropolitan
population reached the huge flgigre
of 12,055,187, while Tokio, on the
other side of the world, came up
from the ruck officially to third place
by announcing its population at 5,-
312,000, jumping ahead of Berlin,
Chicago, Paris and Moscow.
Officially, New York, with a popu-
lation of 6,981,915 in its five bor-
oughs, plays second fiddle to metro-
politan London with 8,202,818; but
the Merchants' association of the
A m e r i c a n metropolis announced
there are more than 12,000,000 hu-
man beings in the city proper and
23 adjoining counties of New York's
trade territory.
Tokio, which had counted its pop-
ulation as 2,500,000 and its area as
31 square miles, went on an annex-
ation spree, absorbed 82 villages and
towns, increased its square mileage
to 233 and its population to more,
than 5,000,000.
The official standings now are:

tober 6, at 8 p. m. sharp. Open for
members only.
Delta Epsilon Pi Fraternity: First
regular meeting next Friday, 8 p. m.
at the Michigan Union.
Pi Lambda Theta: All Pi Lambda
Theta members, whether of Xi chap-
ter of Michigan or any other chap-
ter are cordially invited to a Wel-
coming Tea to be held in the Library
of the Elementary School, corner of
E. University and Monroe, from 3:30

be served. All members of Sigma Xi,
whether actively affiliated with this
chapter or not, are invited to this
meeting. Members and Associates
new to the campus are urged to reg-
ister with the Secretary.
British Universities Dinner will be
held in the Michigan Union on Fri-
day, October 14, at 6:15 p. m. Those
who are intending to be present are
requested to send their names to Mr.
C. W. Collins at the Department of
Library Science.

1, _ U

CHORAL UNION SERIES

mation concerning these tryouts is Ito 5:30 Thursday, October 6. We
posted on the bulletin hoard next should like to meet all Pi Lambda
to the office of the Department of Theta women who are on the cam-
Speech and General Linguistics, 3211 pus.
Angell Hall.
Polonia Circle invites all students Sigma Xi: The first meeting of the
of Polish extraction to their first Michigan Chapter will~be held Fri-
meeting on Thursday, Oct. 6. at the day evening, October 7 at 8 o'clock
Michigan League. in Room 348 West Engineering Bldg.
The research programs of the several
Latin American Society: First departments in this building will be
meeting will be held in Room 304, at discussed and some of the laborator-
the Michigan Union, Thursday, Oc- ies will be visited. Refreshments will

Oct. 25, BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Conductor. Only Mich-
igan concert of America's premier orchestra
Nov. 2, LAWRENCE TIBBETT
PRINCE OF BARITONES.
Nov. 30, DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
OSSIP GABRILOWITSCH, Conductor. Only Ann
Arbor appearance this season
Dec. 12, EFREM ZIMBALIST
DISTINGUISHED RUSSIAN VIOLINIST.
Jan. 16, NATHAN MILSTEIN
SPECTACULAR RUSSIAN-SOVIET VIOLINIST.
In Ann Arbor debut.
Jan. 27, MYRA HESS
Acclaimed "World's foremost woman pianist."
Feb. 8, BUDAPEST STRING QUARTET
Jose Roisman, first violin; Alexander Schneider,
second violin; Stephan I polyi, viola; Mischa
Schneider, 'cello. Ann Arbor debut of "Europe's
finest quartet."
Feb. 15, SEGRI D ON EGIN
Ann Arbor debut of outstanding contralto, both
in opera and concert.
Mar. 6, VLADIMIR HOROWITZ
Eminent Russian pianist in third Ann Arbor
appearance.
Mar. 15, PADEREWSKI
"King of Pianists" in eighth Ann Arbor concert
during a period of 41 years, beginning Feb. 15,
1 893.
Season tickets may be ordered by mail, or orders may be
left at the School of Music, Maynard street (10 concerts)
$6.00 - $8.00 - $10.00 - $12.00. Please make checks
payable to "University Musical Society" and mail to
Charles A. Sink, President.

Greater London .......
New York City ... .. .
Tokio ................
Berlin ................
Chicago . .............
Paris (within walls) .,.
Moscow ..............

8,202,818
.. 6,981,915
... 5,312,000
4,296,000
.... 3,376,438
2,871,039
2,745,000

BRIGHT SPOT
802 Packard Street
Today 11:30 to 1:30
Ham and Cabbage
Breaded Veal Cutlets
Vegetable Plate with Hard-Cooked Egg
Roast Beef
Waldorf Salad with Cold Pork
Sandwich
Baked Apples - Cake -Ice Cream
Coffee - Milk
30c
5:30 to 7:30
Soup
Baked Ham Orange Sauce
Lamb Chop, grilled with Sausage
Bacon and Tomato
Meat Loaf
Irish Stew
Roast Beef
Pork Chops, Apple Sauce
Mashed or French Fried Potaoes
Green Beans- Creamed Cabbage
Spinach
Pie, Chocolate Ice Box Cake
Ice Cream - Jello
Coffee - Tea - Milk
40cJ

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Unusual Program - New Low Priees
-Also
Will Durant,
Frederic William
Wile,
William Butler
Yeats,
Dr. Raymond L.
Ditmars
WELL THOMAS CARVETH WELLS
Cnhinn. 11hpect:

11

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are NOW ON HAND

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