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October 02, 1932 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-10-02

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[CHIGAN DAILY
Established 1890

I

I I I

By Kathleen Murphy

--- =.

,.
Y=
----y

Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
tion and the Big Ten News Service.
. -MEMBER OF THE -ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
riot' otherwise credited in this paper and the-local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rateof postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
. Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
mail, $4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann' Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publishers Representatives,
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylston Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 492x'
MANAGING EDITOR..............FRANK B. GILBRETH
CITY EDITOR.........................KARL SEIFFERT
SPORTS EDITOR..................JOHN W. THOMAS
WOMEN'S EDITOR.................MARGARET O'BRIEN
ASSISTANT WOMEN'S EDITOR........ELSIE FELDMAN
NIGHT,-EDITORS:' Thomas Connellan, Norman F. Kraft,
John W. Pritchard, Joseph W. Renihan, C. Hart Schaaf,
Brackley Shaw, blenn R. Winters.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Fred A. Huber, Albert Newman.
REPORTERS : Edward Andrews, Hyman J. Aronstam, A.
Ellis :Ball, Charles G. Barndt, James, Bauchat, Donald
R. Bird, Donald' F. Blankertz, Charles B. Brownson,
Arthur W. Carstens, Donald Elder, Robert Engel, Ed-
ward A. Genz, Eric Hall, John C. Healey, Robert B.
Hewett, Alvin Schleifer, 'George Van Vleck, Cameron
Walker, Guy M. Whipple, Jr., W. Stoddard White,
Leonard A. Rosenberg.
Eleanor B. Blum, Miriam Carver, Louise Crandall, Carol
J. Hannan, Frantees Marichester, Marie J. Murphy,
Margaret C. Phalan, Katherine Rucker, Marjorie West-
ern and Harriet Speiss.
BUSINESS STAFF
T'elephone '24214 '
BUSINESS MANAGER.............BYRON C, VEDDER
CREDIT MANAGER ...................HARRY BEGLEY
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER........DONNA BECKER
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Advertising, Grafton Sharp;
Advertising Contracts, Orvil Aronson; Advertising Serv-
ice, Noel Turner; Accounts, Bernard E. Schnacke; Cir-
culation, Gilbert E. Bursley; Publications, Robert E.
Finn.
ASSISTANTS: Theodore Barash, Jack Bellamy, Gordon
Boylan, Charles Ebert, Jack Efroymson, Fred Hertrick,
Joseph Hume, Howard Klein, Alen Knuusi, George
Laurie, Charles Mercill, Russell Read, Lester Skinner,
Joseph Sudow and Robert Ward.
Betty Aigler, Edna Canner, Genevieve Field, Ann Gall-
meyer, Doris Gimmy, Billie Griffiths, Helen Grossner,
Kathryn Jackson, Dorothy Laylin, Virginia McConb,
Caroline Mosher, Helen Olson, Helen Schume, May See-
fried, Kathryn Stork.

Ruth Pfohl, who has joined the faculty of the
School of Music as instructor in Harp, will make
her first public appearance in ;Ann Arbor, at the
faculty concert in Hill Auditorium, Sunday after-
noon, October 2. Others on the program will be
Arthur Hackett, tenor; Wassily Besekirsky, Violin-
ist, and Joseph Brinkman, Pianist. An interesting
and varied program of songs, harp numbers and a
Sonata for violin and piano, by Cesar Franck, will
be given.
Miss Pfohl comes from North Carolina, where
she has made a fine reputation, as harpist. She
was educated in Boston and other eastern cities
and has also done special work in music at the
University School of Music. Her coming to Ann
Arbor will expand the School's general music fa-
cilities.
Professor Hackett, who has been at the head of
the voice department for two years, is a renowned
a r t i s t, having toured extensively throughout
America and Europe. Professor Besekirsky has
won distinction as soloist, ensemble player, and
orchestral player, while Joseph Brinkman, as
pianist, is well known by reason of his many ap-
pearances.
Other faculty concerts will be announced from
time to time.
Recit. "Deeper and Deeper Still" fron
"Jephtha"..,.....................Handel
Aria, "Waft Her Angels" from "Jephtha"
..........-. ..'... Handel
Arthur Hackett
Prelude in C Minor ..................... Chopin
Mirage ................................Salzedo
Lamento ........................ Hasselmans
Ruth Pfohl
La Fontaine De Caraouet ..............Letorey
Trois Jours De Vendanges ................ Hahn
La Procession ...... .................Franck
Sur La Mer ........................... Gaubert
Le Ciel Est Gai. ................ Gaubert
Arthur Hackett
Sonata for Piano and Violin .......Cesar Franck
Allegretto ben moderato
Allegro.
Recitative-fantasia
Allegretto poco mosso.
Wassily Besekirsky and Joseph Brinkman
THE THEATRE=
B3yGeorge Spelvin
WOULD YOU MIND REPEATING
THAT STATEMENT, MR. FRIEDBERG?
A General Rebuttal, Though
Goodness Knows Mr. F. Didn't Get
Around To Saying Very Much, Somehow
To our public, we must issue a warning at the
beginning: don't expect anything about drama-
ties in today's column.
You'd better turn to something else. This is a
private argument between Mr. Saul Friedberg (a
former Daily critic) and your Uncle George about
'Mr Friedberg's Campus Opinion letter of Sat-
urday. Private-because I suspect Mr. F. and I
were the only people on campus that read what
he wrote all through.
If any of you really did read it, you might tag
along, though, and see how things come out.
It ,must be admitted that I feel somewhat at a
disadvantage in a debate against Mr. Friedberg-
because what Mr. Friedberg says is so often in-
coherent and because what I say is so often clear.
If I am a fake, it will not be hard to discover.
Mr. Friedberg's case will take an amount of exca-
vation.
Hence, I intend to disarm Mr. Friedberg by
summarizing, briefly and impartially, what he
said-though perhaps I am rather unkind in ex-
posing what he has spent so much time covering
up.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY-
lieve whimsy expresses a certain philosophy that
Mr. Friedberg hasn't hit upon yet.
3 At this point I must paraphrase from mem-
ory a paragraph of George Bernard Shaw's. Mr.
Friedberg may not accept Shaw as a reputable
source (Mr. Gorman once said to me his very own
self that Shaw was a failure, and Mr. Friedberg
is well known as the St. Steven of the Gorman
cult on campus). But here it is, anyway: people, '
when confronted with a dangerous truth, will
laugh and call the author of it a droll fellow (in
this case the word is the more vehement "don-
key"). The amused shrug-of-the-shoulders atti-
tude will, I hope, hardly be accepted by intelligent
people as a complete dismissal of this case. I
might have passed Mr. Friedberg's irrelevant let-
ter off with the statement that it was its own re-
buttal;'* it is. I didn't, partly because as Shaw
points out that sort of defense is usually a sign
that the defender has been wounded. The real -
reason was, I'm afraid, that Mr. Friedberg offered
such a splendid opportunity for all this fun.
4 I doubt that my views on those blood-thirsty
Socialists or those luxury-jaded Capitalists can be
gotten into a dramatic column. Suffice it to say
that Mr. Gorman has never come very close to
them.
5 There is no way of proving to Mr. Friedberg
that he's wrong about my rosy outlook and the sP
clambake and whatnot. He'll simply have to take
my word for it, I'm afraid. My quarrel, as I re-
member, was not with Mr. Gorman's individu-
ality. He should have had more.
SP *.
And the children voted it the loveliest picnic
Miss Murgatroyd's class had ever, ever had.
Student HealthMR
Fri
SKIN TEST FOR TUBERCULOSIS
By Dr. Margaret Bell

Attend The Union
Political Forums .. .

WHEN HENRY T. RAINEY comes to
the Union on Wednesday' to ad-
dress a luncheon and student forum, he will in-
augurate for this year the series of political dis-
cussions started a year ago by the Union.
Rainey is the Democratic floor leader of the
House of Representatives, and if the Democrats
win the November election he will in all probabil-
ity be the next Speaker. A man in his position
should be interesting to a student audience in any
year, but in this election year what he says is of
the utmost importance.
In England and on the continent students are
not so blase about their political affiliations as
most American students. The most famous de-
bating club in the world is the Oxford Union,
an organization that heatedly argues political
policies of the British Empire and on the floor
of which many of England's greatest statesmen
have made their maiden speeches...,
In France, as well, political affiliation is not a
casual matter to the student. In such Univer-
sities as the Sorbonne in Paris, students choose
their rooming houses by their political viewpoints,
the socialists, liberals, conservatives and other
parties.
In a country where a great part of the citizenry
do not know that they cannot .split their ticket
on a primary election ballot and cannot under-
stand why they are not allowed to-as happened
in the recent Michigan primaries--there is cer-
tainly room for a little more of this rabid parti-
sanship on the part of the students.
The Union, in bringing to Ann Arbor these men
prominent in the political limelight, is attempting
to arouse on the campus a little more interest and
enthusiasm in government and its efforts deserve
the co-operation of the entire student body.
An intelligent interest in the government is the
duty of every citizen and the only method of de-
veloping such an interest is to gain a knowledge
of the problems that face the law-makers. Rainey
is here for the express purpose of informing the
students what these problems are.
Attend the Union political forums!

THE FRIEDBERG PRONOUNCEMENT1
NOT A LITTLE CONDENSED
J An attitude of whimsical flippancy ap-
peared in Gargoyle two winters ago.
2 The Gargoyle aesthetes did not take ex-
aminations, Life, or Corman seriously, nor did ,
they understand their own peculiar philos-
ophy.
3 That attitude has spread to the Daily.
Splevin is a donkey and his recent essay on
Gorman is not worth refuting.
4 Gorman is really, being like him a loyal
child of Capitalism, partly an apostle of Spel-
vin's ideas and Spelvin therefore is silly in
fighting him.
.5 Spelvin is only an eccentric Babbitt,
thinks life is rosy, bows down to campus shib-
boleths, and dislikes Gorman for not doing so.
There is the whole business in a tenth of the
space. For the rest, Mr. Friedberg talked about
many things literary and political which seemed
beside the point. He also indicated that your
Uncle George is dishonest, plays bridge and at-
tends clam-bakes (all of which I indignantly deny
-imagine a dishonest person at a clam-bake);
that your Uncle George drinks tea and is lazy
(matters that I'd rather not discuss).
WILL SOMEBODY
HOLD OUR COAT PLEASE?
Though there is nothing your Uncle George
likes quite so much as talking about himself, I do
feel that Mr. Friedberg erred in putting the dis-
cussion on so personal a basis. Had he discussed
the value of my criticism rather than attempting
to invalidate it by calling names, I should be able
to fill the present column with a discussion on
dramatics. As it is, my only recourse is to refute
those personal references. I might, of course,,
come back with a discussion of Mr. Friedberg's
work on the Daily, if I could remember what it
was like. I can't seem to, though.
So you'll pardon me while I talk about myself.
The points are taken up as they are numbered
above.
F1 You bet it did. Mr. Friedberg (always the
past coming between!) wrote for Gargoyle at the
time, but the languid humorousness of it all
frightened him away.
2 "Aesthetes," indeed! If there was anything
aesthetic about Gargoyle under Paul Showers I'll
eat Mr. Friedberg's next Campus Opinion manu-
script.
Mr. Friedberg, in condemning the whimsical

This article is written in an effort to make
clear to the students, especially the freshman
women who have had the advantage of this test,
its value in the prpevention of tuberculosis.
It is well to remember that the key-note of the
Health Service work is prevention. A very serious
and enlightened effort is made to use every device
to anticipate and eradicate disease. In such
a program it immediately becomes obvious that
the shortest course to success is the accurate
education of the student in preventive measures.
The skin test coupled with the x-ray is at
present the most refined and only way of recog-
nizing the very earliest stages of this disease.
Obviously this becomes an expensive method when
carried out on a large group of students and nec-
essarily is of great advantage to such a group.
This test was given to women students because
young women of college age represent the group
that is most susceptible to pulmonary tubercu-
losis.
For the first time in September, 1931, this skin
test was incorporated in the women's entering
medical examinations. The 871 entering women
were given this test and a preparation called
tuberculin was injected into the skin of the arm.
If a red halo appeared in 48 hours, the test was
read as positive. If no halo appeared or there
was no reaction, the test was read as negative.
Each individual who had a positive reaction, and
38% or about 300 of these women so tested, was
x-rayed. Of the total number x-rayed, six were
regarded as deserving special care as they had
had tuberculosis in the lung tissue in a mild form.
Twelve of the cases were set aside for observa-
tion and no diagnoses were made.
The meaning of a negative reaction is simply
that that individual has never been infected with
the Tuberculin Bacillus. There are certain rare
exceptions which do not concern this group. The
meaning of a positive reaction is that that indi-
vidual has at some time during life, from infancy
on, been infected with the tuberculin bacillus.
It does not mean tuberculosis, it does not mean
disease of any sort, it simply means previous
infection by one means or another. It may have
been from a bottle of milk from infected cows
taken during infancy, or the chance contact with
a carrier of the disease in school, the theatre
or elsewhere. It does not mean susceptibility to
this or any other disease; in fact. it may mean
a certain degree of immunity to tuberculosis. For,
on the face of it, if a person is known to have
been infected and is now known to be healthy,
that person must have sufficient immunity or
resistance to have prevented the infection from
spreading. The harmlessness of. the test has been
demonstrated over and over again on many hun-
dreds of thousands of children in this country
and the world over. Two or three weeks after
the infection takes place certain changes occur
in the body which makes the skin sensitive to
tuberculin and this sensitiveness persists through
life with exceptions. When infection takes place
we known that over 90% of it localizes in the
lungs and that lung disease is the most serious
aspect of tuberculosis. Therefore, in all positive
reactions, an x-ray of the lungs is taken and the
presence or absence, extent, localization, and
character of the infected focus is searched for.
In Dr. Chadwick's experience with school chil-
dren about 30 out of every hundred showed evi-
dence of infection, and about five had signs of its
localization in the glands in the chest, while one
in every two hundred had definite tuberculosis of
the lungs that needed immediate treatment. There
is no other way of being sure to find this one
diseased student among two hundred. In other
cases, one finds enough old healed tuberculosis
to be able to advise the student about her future
life, that she might avoid awakening a dormant
disease focus. This is simply taking the bull
by the horns, instead of waiting until the disease
becomes, disabling. It means that the healthy
have to go through a lot of seemingly unnecessary
examinations to protect the few. But there is no
other way of separating the many from the few.
It is found in the apparently healthy as often as
in the obviously diseased.
With these facts in mind, it is interesting to
realize that while relatively few infants present
readings of positive tuberculin that with each
added year an increasing number show positive
reaction.,
Now it is obvious that if the infection is found
in larger and larger percentages as students grow
older, it is not enough to content one's self with
one examination at the age of 18. If one is
negative at 18, one might as easily become posi-
tive at 19 or 20 as the other had become positive
before 18. In fact, the older one gets and the
wider contact one makes with life, the more op-
portunity there is for infection. Therefore, it is
important that those who are negative this year
be re-tested next year to determine if infection

Phone 2-2757
208 Michigan Theatre Bldg.

-i

24214
It's a good number
to keep in mind.
You'll want it
if you've
LOST
a book, or key
-i
or fountain pen,
then if you've
by chance
FOUND
a coat, a badge,
or hat
24214
will help to find the
owner. But that isn't
all. If you would
like to
RENT
a room, or have one
rented, the same little
number will do it.
A lot of other things
too . . . try it
Miehiaii
Daily
9(
Classfied

CONCERTIS
CHORAL UNION SERIES

Oct. 25, BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Conductor. Only Mich-
igan concert of America's premier orchestra

DAILY CLASSIFIED ADS PAY

Nov. 2, LAWRENCE TItBBETT
PRINCE OF BAR ITONES

Nov.30, DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
OSSIP GABRILOW ITSCH, Conductor. Only Ann
Arbor appearance this season
Dec. 12, EFREM ZIMBALIST
DISTINGUISHED RUSSIAN VIOLINIST.
Jan. 16, NATHAN MILSTEIN
SPECTACULAR RUSSIAN-SOVIET VIOLINIST.
In Ann Arbor debut.
Jan. 27, MYRA HESS
Acclaimed "World's foremost woman pianist..
Feb. 8, BUDAPEST STRING QUARTET
Jose Roisman, first violin; Alexander Schneider,
second violin; Stephan lpolyi, viola; Mischa
Schneider, 'cello. Ann Arbor debut of "Europe's
finest quartet."
Feb. 15, SEGRID ONEGIN
Ann Arbor debut of outstanding contralto, both
in opera and concert.
Mar.6, VLADIMiIHOROWITZ
Eminent Russian pianist in third Ann Arbor
appearance.
Mar, 15, PADEREWSKI
"King of Pionists" in eighth Ann Arbor concert
during a period of 41 years, beginring Feb. 15,
1893.

The Depression Hits
Collegiate Drinking. .. {
T HE depression has been used al-
most an infinite number of times
during the past year as an alibi for shortcomings.
It is with genuine pleasure, therefore, that we
point to certain improvements in social conditions,
brought about either directly or indirectly by the
modern under-dog.
..
We refer to the apparent lack of intoxication,
especially among students of high school and col-
lege age, at the football game yesterday. Never,
in recent years, has there been a more orderly

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