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January 25, 1933 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-01-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY iv

Bell Explains
Women's Gym
Requirements
Many Receive Corrective
Exercises, Others Play
On Intramural Teams
(Continued from Page 1)
runs through the day and into the
evening so that students may elect
the desired activity at a suitable
hour. Many of our students are work-
ing for pay and special arrangements
are made for these students in every
known case.
The purely elective program with
competition in both team games, in-
dividual sports and various types of
dancing is carried on from 4 to 6
o'clock each day, three evenings a
week and on Saturday morning.
Our program at present is only
limited by the facilities available in-
doors.
Statistics of Participation in Inter-
class, Intramural and Elective Sports
through January 24, 1933:
Interclass hockey ......85
Intramural hockey .....180
Archery..............27
Golf....... ......30
Tennis..............75
Interclass Basketball .,.. 60
Swimming ..... ....76
Bowling.............50
Rifle................47
Outdoor. ...........75
Dancing.............14
Riding ..............50
Elective Archery.......10
Elective Golf...... ..12
Elective Posture .. ..20
Elective Tap Dancing ... 20
Elective Swimming .... 75
Elective Bowling......100
1005*
* No effort is made to check indi-
vidual students using the equipment
at other times than in tournament
play or in elective classes.
There has been a progressive in-
crease in intramural participation

Dean Of 'Hobo College' Explains Technocracy

Depression, Not Climate, Calls
Einstein To Ca lifornia On Visit

-Associated Press Photo
Students and "graduates" of Chicago's "hobo college" took the
problem of technocracy into their own hands as James McBeth, dean
of the college, mounted the rostrum and explained technocracy as he
understood it. - .

PASADENA, Calif., Jan. 23.-UP--
The depression and not relativity is
the problem that pulled Albert Ein-
stein to the United Sattes for his
third annual visit to California.
This was made known today in the
completion of plans for a mass meet-
ing tonight devoted to the problem
of the depressoin primarily from the
phase of "German-American rela-
tions."
The Berlin professor of relativity
is to appear on a program with
Henry M. Dobinson, banker who
served on the supreme allied eco-
nomic council and the Dawes repa-
rations commission; Dr. Robert A.
Millikan, cosmic ray hunter and
philosophical leader, and Dr. Wil-
liam B. Munro, professor of history
and government at California Insti-
tute of Technology.
Einstein has disclosed that his dis-
cussion is by commission of the Ob-
erlaender trust of the Carl Schurz
foundation of Philadelphia, which is
bearing the costs of this, his third
visit to the United States. He like-
wise has made known that the theory
of relativity is not applicable to the
problems of the world today.
Just what has caused the unsettled
conditions in the world today and
what steps should be taken to settle
them is the subject upon which the
pacifist-relativist,ethe banker-eco-
nomist, the cosmic ray hunter the
political-economist will bend their
intellectual energies.
In the educational world each of
these speakers is recognized as a
leader. Each has spent considerable
time in the cultural centers of other
nations and their names are promi-
nently identified with international
cultural exchange relations.
The program, entitled "A Syinpo-
sium on America and the World Sit-
uation," will be held in Pasadena
Civic Auditorium. It is avowed for
the purpose of interesting public
opinion on the subject.
The leaders who have made the
program possible have arranged for*
its presentation under auspices of the
Southern California Student: Body
Presidents' Association.
Dr. Millikap will introduce*' Ein-
stein. The German professor's topic

will be "On German American Agree-
ment." Einstein will be followed by
Robinson, who will discuss the con-
ditions leading to the economic upset
in the world today, with his sugges-
tions for their remedy. Prof. Munro
will close the discussion with a re-
view of the politico-economic ques-
tions involved.
Audiphone For Deaf
To Be Demonstrated
The Audiphone, a, recent develop-
ment of the Western Electric Com-
pany to aid defective hearing, will
be demonstrated by William M. Pee-
ple, of the Michigan Bell Telephone
Company, from 6 a. m. to 9 p. m.
Thursday at Quarry's Drug Store.
Consultations will be given free
of charge by calling Quarry's and
making an appointment. Private
rooms will be at the disposal of those
who wish consultations.
FORMER WOLVERINES STAR
Norman Daniels, captain of the
1931-32 basketball team, and Al
Shaw, reserve guard on the same
squad, are playing with the Simpson
team of the Detroit Semi-Profes-
sional Court League. Both men are
among the leading scorers in the
circuit.

.. ,
,. f ,
'V
>f:

Students' One-Week Special
Be Photographed in Your New
Formal Frock
One Large Size Opal Portrait .... , . . .. .;..$1.00
One Oil Painting ........... . . ....... .75
One Cellophane Frame.............. .1.00
Total...................... .....$2.75
APPLICATION PHOTOS 3 for $1, 12 for $1.75
REMBRANDT STUDIO
121 East Liberty, First Floor
(Formerly of Mack and Co.)

nI

I,

f
T1:T-
I~ < _: rr~Ni

FIRST NATIONAL BANK
AND TRUST COMPANY
Est. 1863
COMMERCIAL - SAVINGS
TRUST - SAFE DEPOSIT

TRAVELERS' CHECKS

11

Member Federal Reserve System,
Under U. S. Government
Supervision

Age Of Fish Found
By Counting Scales
If you want to know how old a
horse is you look at its teeth. If you
want to know how old a tree is you
count its rings. And if you want to
know how old a fish is you count the
rings on its scales, on much the same
principle as it were a tree. Yes, fish
have rings too.
Because the scales tell so much
about the fish they come from, the
headquarters for Great Lakes inves-
tigation of the U. S. Bureau of Fish-
eries, located in the Museums Build-
ing here, keeps a huge filing cabinet
for nothing but fish scales, thou-
sands' and thousands of scales from
three summer expeditions in the gov-
ernment ship Fulnar on Lake Mich-
igan.
When the scales are made .into
microscopic slides and projected on
a screen the rings of development
can easily be traced and the annual
rings counted. From these tiny scales
the size of the fish at any time dur-
ing its life can be calculated, ac-
cording to Dr. Stillman Wright, of
the local staff, and from these fig-
ures recommendations for fishing re-
strictions are made.
Final scenes for a motion picture
story of the work of the local bureau
were recently made by Walter has-
tings, of the department of conser-
vation. These, together with earlier
pictures taken last summer on board
the Fullmar, will compose the con-

plete account of investigations being
carried on by the bureau. The pic-
ture will be shown here some time in
the future.
Special investigations being car-
ried out by the bureau include the
testing of fish-nets to determine the
values of various sizes of mesh, the
setting of 800 drift bottles to deter-
mine direction of currents, and the
taking of bottom samples and water
temperatures.
TOMATO JUICE DANGEROUS
BERKELEY, Calif., Jan. 24.- I
Drinkers of the popular vim-restor-
ing, alcohol-chasing beverage, to-
mato juice, are advised to take only
moderate doses by European med-
ical authorities who have recently
announced through experiments that
the juice contains matter liable to
create cancer of the stomach. The
investigators arrived at this conclu-
sion after numerous experiments
upon albino rats.

' II

I'

I

FOR THOSE "HORRID" EXAMS - You should have an
and a supply of WAHR'S FAMOUS BLUE BOOKS

11

Review and Reference Books at

WAH"R'S

UNIVERBOOKSTORE

e are now about 375 freshman
) sophomore women enrolled.
Senior year, only 150 of the
1freshmen will remain to
te. The same readjustment
in the Junior year to a lesser
The conclusion is obvious-_
ae senior class is over 600 and
nior class is the next largest
hirds to three-quarters of all:
assmen have never taken any

State Street

Main

11

sh
it

should not be
vidual's physical
a her physical
compatible with
be available at aI
,dequate time to
d dress so that a
is experienced.

Ott

.1'

afe, bie
of well bei

F

FREE FREE FREE
REE WEEK
at all
CALKINS-FLETCHER
DRUG STORES

4,

FREE w
F EE 5cwith
Colga
FREECOT
With
Coty

I FREE
r FREE

25cI
with
Haze
25c
With
Tek r

25c '
cake:
FREE HAWt
Bair
25McE
F"I'EWith
50cE
$1 R
FREE With
$1.00
JIGS
With
50c P
FREE PAR
With
durin
A beautiful Propelo
with e
ASTRIN

COUET'TE
the purchase of one 21Ci.
)ESS at.
TOOTHBRUSH
the purchase of two
ates Toothpaste .,
Y PERFUME0$1
the purchase of one t -
Face Powder
EHazeloin Tissue
the purchase of one
loin Lotion . . .......
M'anikew Stick
the purchase of one 49c m
Tooth Brush......
Woodbury Cream
h the purchase of three
s Woodbury Soap...
I COMB
the purchase of one
Brush ....... 9
EversharpLeads.
the purchase of one
Eversharp pencil.....
enaud Perf ime
te purchase of one 98c
Renaud Talc...
AW PUZZLE
the purchase of one 49c
?rophylactic Brush...
KER PENCIL (to match)
every Parker Pen purchased
ig this sale.
FREE
and Repel automatic pencil
very bottle of
GOSOL 57 c

All races of people since the beginning
of time, so far as we have been able
to read, have had some kind of a pipe
and have smoked something-whether
they called it tobacco or what not.
ND since smoking a pipe is so different
from smoking a cigar or cigarette,
we made a most painstaking, scientific
study in an effort to make, if we could,
a tobacco which was suited to pipes.
We found out, first, that there was a
kind of tobacco that grew in the Blue
Grass section of Kentucky called White

and we'd like
to talk with you
fabout i t

'9331
LIGGETT & MYERS
TOBACCO CO.

TEN CENTS

Burley, and that there was a certain kind
of this tobacco which was between the
tobacco used for cigarettes and the to-
bacco used for chewing tobacco. It is
this tobacco which is best for pipes.
We found out that Mr. J. N. Wellman,

The Granger pouch
keeps the tobacco fresh
- cut right. So we put
nsible soft foil pouch

Next was the cut. We knew that fine

- right process
Granger in a sc

tobacco

burnt hot because it burnt so

fast. You could hardly hold your pipe in
your hand, it got so hot at times. So
remembering how folks used to "whittle"

instead of an expensive package, knowing
that a man can't smoke the package.
GRANGER has ,not been on sale very

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