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October 01, 1932 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-10-01

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THE M ICHI GAN DAILY SATURDAY, .OCT

1,152,000 Enrolled
In Liquor Reformii
Group, Sabin Says
MINNEAPOLIS, Sept. 30-(A)-An
enrollment of 1,152,000 members in
the Women's organization for Na-.
tional Prohibition Reform was
claimed by Mrs. Charles H. Sabin of
New York to the executive commit-
tee of the group, which was formed
by 17 women in 1929.
She told the committee that a ma-
%jority of the members have been
added in the last year and that "this
clearly indicates the direction from
which opposition to the 18th amend-
ment is coming in increasing force,
from women who have lost their re-
spect for it and want it repealed."
She said the group now has a
larger membership in many states
than the Women's Christian Tem-
perance union.
"The reason is easy to under-
stand," Mrs. Sabin said. "We are
now the party of temperance, the W.
C. T. U. has become the party of in-
tolerance. Temperance is and always
will be the women's cause. But
temperance cannot be insured, as
these good ladies seem to think,
merely by preempting a claim upon
the word."
A committee met to discuss plans
for giving active support to candi-
dates for congress who favor repeal
of the amendment.
Thirty-eight states have legislation
providing for liquor control which
would become effective in event of
repeal, Jouett Shouse, president of
the Association Against the Prohibi-
tion Amendment, said in addressing
a mass meeting in St. Paul. He said
only ten states would have to enact
laws for liquor control.
at 10:45 a. m. upon "A Modern Phil-
osophy of Life"
President Ruthven will deliver the
first Wesleyan Guild Lecture for this
year at 7:30 p. m. Sunday upon the
subject: 'Education and Character
Training," at First Methodist Church.
Harris Hall: The first student sup-
per of the year will be held Sunday
in the Hall at 6:15 p. in. at a small
cost of 25 cents. The Reverend Henry
Lewis will address the student group
at 7:00 p. m.
Lutheran Student Club will meet
in the Zion Lutheran Parish Hall
Sunday evening at 5:30. A half hour
of fellowship will be followed by the
L u n c h e o n. The discussion on
"Church and University Life" will
open at 6:30. Dr. Carl Rufus of the
University Faculty with the student
pastor, will speak on the topic which
will then be opened for discussion.
Presbyterian Young People's So-
ciety meet for fellowship and supper
at 5:30 p. in. Sunday. Miss Margaret
Norton is to lead the meeting and
is to tell us of some of her experi-
ences working with the welfare or-
ganizations on the East Side of New
York City.
The Student classes meet at 9:30
a. m. at the Church House, 1432
Washtenaw.
Baptist Guild, 503 E. Huron St.
Sunday, 12:00 Discussion Group led
by Rev. Howard R. Chapman. 6:00
Guild Meeting. Address by the Pres-
ident, A r t h u r Bernhart, Grad.
Friendship hour and refreshments
following.
Liberal Students Union: Professor
John F. Shepard, of the department
of Psychology, will speak on "Athe-
ism on the Michigan Campus." Uni,.
tarian church, Sunday at 7:30
o'clock.
Hillel Foundation will hold a re-
ception for all Jewish Freshmen on
Sunday evening, Oct. 2, at 8:00. Rab-
bi B. Heller and Dr. R. Kahn will

speak. The reception is open to all
students new on the campus and will
be held at the Hillel Foundation,
corner of E. University and Oakland
streets.
Students' Wives (Called Michigan
Dames). The first meeting of the
year will be held in the Grand Ra-
pids Room of the Michigan League
Tuesday, October 4, at 8 p. m. This
club is yours for fun and friendship.
Come and get acquainted.

To LectreTiih

tAssociatedPress Photo)
FRANK CROSSWAITH
resent Negro
Oraor Toni it
Frank (2romwaith To Ad--.
-es Pubi O~i 'The
Frank Crosswaith Negro candidate
for Congress from the Harlem dis-
trict, Manhattan, will speak at 8 p.
m. tonight in Pattengill Auditori-
um, Ann Arbor High School. His
address has been arranged by the
Socialist party of Ann Arbor and stu-
dent backers of Norman Thomas,
candidate for the Presidency. His
subject will be "The Next Emanci-
pation."
Mr. Crosswaith is id tA li. one
of the most briiant and consistent
records of service to the working pco
pie of ihis couuIry of any i)erson.
whether white or Negro.
Born in Friedricistad St. Croix,
Virgin Islands, he came to this coun-
try while still a youth. After an
early start as an elevator operator,
he was able to attend several schools
and is now a graduate of the Rand
School of Social Science, New York
City, where he is a teacher.
Union for Organizing Negro Work-
ers and has worked with most of the
union pertaining to Negroes since
that time. For the past two years
he has edited the Negro Labor News
Service.
Mr. Croswaith is noted as the
Socialist party's foremost orator.
Sro'iusl Pre pares
'Broadly Pleasig'
Co11cert Prograi
Broad f nd comprehensive, some-
thing to please everybody," were the
terms used yesterday by Prof. Pal-
mer Christian of the Music School in
describing the series of Wednesday
afternoon organ concerts he has pre-
pared for this year. The first of the
recitals is at 4:15 p. m. next Wed-
nesday in Hill Auditorium.
"In preparing these programs," he
continued, "one might follow a plan,
such as presenting a series of com-
positions grouped by schools or na-
tionalities. This has its advantages.
But here attendance is voluntary,
and in selecting. compositions one
must hit the nail on the head every
time."
The recital next Wednesday will
present one of the compositions of
Bach, characterized by Mr. Chris-
tian as "the livest composer today
because of his continued popularity,
although he died in the eighteenth
century." It will include several clas-
sical selections, and a modern, the
first three movements of Widor's
Sixth Symphony.
T Y P EWRI T E R S
MI~~~ 9r 2a adYrab 9
Sol te cagedRaire
Large choice stockl&.Veys,
0A Do 110 R RI LIL,

Will Bet Here
November 3,4,5
Program Will Be Best Of
Kind Yet Featured Here,
Dr. Henderson Claims
Kilpatrick To Speak
EnrollmientF or I ast Two
P. E. J. Meetings Greater
Than Was Expected
This year's Parent Education In-
stitute, to be held here Nov. 3, 4 and
5, will have the best program that
has been featured by any institute
of its kind at the University, ac-
cording to Dr. William D. Henderson,
director of the University Extension
Division.
"The high caliber of the men on
this year's program makes this prom-
ise to be better than anything we
have done in the past," Dr. Hender-
son said. Among those he mentioned
were Dr. William H. Kilpatrick, of
Columbia 'University, and Dr. W. E.
Blatz, psychiatrist from the Univer-
sity of Toronto.
Large Enrollment Expected
"The enrollment for the two Par-
cut Education Institutes which we
have held in the past has in both
cases been greater than that which
we have expected," Dr. Henderson
said, "and there is no reason to be-
lieve that this year will be an ex-
ception to the rule,"
Those who have attended these
institutes in the past, as well as the
Institutes of Adult Education and
Labor, have been most enthusiastic,
Dr. Henderson declared. Every year
scores of requests for information on
coming institutes are received, he
These istitutes .are important as
the means which the Extension Di-
vision employs to reach communities
to solve in an eflort to solve coin-
munity problems," Dr. Henderson
said. "We used to try to reach the
cons um ties by working through the
churches. 'The breakdown of com-
munity life in Michigan in the last
30 years made some other sort of
medium necessary.
No Political Affiliations
"It was about this time that Par-
ent-Teacher A s s o ci a t i o n s were
springing up, and we quite naturally
accepted them as a medium of ap-
proach to the newer communities,
They have proved most satisfactory,
since they have neither political nor
religious affiliations."
Three methods of contact between
the Division and the communities as
outlined by Dr. Henderson, are the
parent-teacher courses, the Parent
Hour radio series, broadcast at 2 p.
m each Sunday, and the institutes.
This is the first of three institutes
which are planned for the year, it is
announced. The others will be the
Adult Education Institute, to be held
in co-operation with the Michigan
Federation of Women's Clubs, and
the Michigan Labor Institute.
200 DEAD IN EARTHQUAKE
ATHENS, Sept. 30-IP)---The count
of victims of the week's earthquakes
at Chalcidice, set Thursday at more
than 200 dead, continued to rise to-
day as many dead and wounded were
being found under crumbled ruins.
2:00-- 3:40 -700 - 9:00
MAJESTIC
Today-the Great
Radio Drama!

4 : NL .0, I
T*X~ orMAIW
Nenr. Wital

LOST
LOST-Red plaid scarf belonging to
ensemble, probably in League cafe-
teria. Call U. Ext. 673.
LOST-Football ticket application.
Reward to finder. Notify J. E.
Bannasch. 621 Church St. Phone
7037.
NOTICE
STUDENTS' LAUNDRY by experi-
enced laundress. Prices reasona-
ble. Will call for and deliver. Call
116 and ask for 769F13.
ATTENTION! Have your shoe re-
pairing and hat blocking done at
Liberty Shoe Repair Shop. 622
E. Liberty.
STAYBROOK COUNTRY SCHOOL.
Washtenaw road. Full day rates
including lunch-$25.00 per month.
Half day rates-$12.50. Transpor-
tation proVided. Age, from infan-
cy to 8 years. Mrs. H. S. Mallory,
director. Tel. 23891 and 9806.
WALKER'S Home Laundry-Student
laundry a specialty. Terms very
reasonable. Dial 4776. We call for
and deliver.

FOR RENT-Furnished cottage close
to campus. Very reasonable. 7673.
FOR RENT-Eight room furnished
house,. with coal. Possession at
once. Phone 7794.
FOR RENT- Rooms $2. Separate
study and sleeping room. 1130
Oakland Ave. Phone 5746.
TWO ROOM apartment. Everything
furnished $22.50 a month. 1025
Vaughn St. Telephone 22251.

NEW HOME LAUNDRY-Liberty at
Maynard. Free mending and darn-
ing. Collars and cuffs reversed.
Opening special, 12c a shirt cash
and carry. Dial 8894.
STUDENTS' ATTENTION -- Nicely
furnished front suite. Family table
service. Home cooked meals $7.50
per week each. 612 Hill St.
ATTENTION Fraternities and So-
rorities: Piano tuning by the con-
cert artist tuner. Phone 6776. The
highest quality of piano repairing
and tuning, Exclusive tuner for
University School of Music. Not
with any music house,.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Room for 3 men stu-
dents. Do own roomwork. $1.50
per man,. Call 21864.
LARGE, well-located room reasona-
ble. Also nicely furnished home,
piano. fireplace, garage to right
tenants. 928 Oakland.
FOR RENT-A large restful room
for two persons. $2 each. Half
block from campus. Roommate
wanted to share suite. 219 South
Thayer.

CLASSIFIED IR ECTORY

FOR RENT-Attractive rooms for
men. Reasonable. 931 Green-
wood.
FOR RENT-Front room with fam-
ily of three adults. Breakfast op-
tional. Phone 8447.
WANTED
WANTED--College man, who has
had direct selling experience man-
aging crews on hosiery, dresses,
brushes, 6esmetics or similar prod-
ucts, Must be capable of organiz-
ing and supervising crew (men and
women) to sell a fast moving line
of wool sport jackets and rain
coats to college students and
townspeople in Ann Arbor and Yp-
silanti. The right man cannot only
pay his way through school but
make a substantial income in ad-
dit ion. No investment or long
hours required, but experience and
A-1 character references are es-
sential. Write giving details of past
experience and other qualifications.
General Garment Company, Three
Rivers, Michigan.
WANTED-Stidentlaundry. Good
work at reasonable r a t e s. All
mending free. Called for and de-
livered. Dial 4929.
STUDENT LAUNDRY Good ,iot
water. Will call for and deliver,
Sure satisfac tion. Telephone 4863.
LAUNDRY - -S^ft water,2 1044.Tow-
els free, Socks darned,
WASHING and ironing. Called for
and delivered. Silks and woolens
guaranteed satisfactory 223478.
611 Hoover,
W A N T E D-Student and family
washing, rough dry or ironed. Rea-
sonable, call for and deliver, Phone
5118,
STUDENT LAUNDRY-Done in pri-
vate home, good work at reason-
able rates. All mending free. Call-
ed for and delivered. Dial 4929.

I

A

19 T
SA D"LE STABLE~S
FAIR GROUNDS
Phone 7418
FIVE OUT-DOOR TRAILS
We feature again this fall our night riding-in the
Indoor Ring with music for 50c per hr.
Classes and Private Instruction.

S1 . S to St., An Arbor,

TODAY
PHILLIPS UOLMH$DOROTHY JORDAN
(RARLIE RUGGLE JOHN NY CKORQW
SCREEN'S FIRST FOOTBALL MURDER MYSTER'
Zalso -
ZAZU P ITTS and THELMA TODD

- '.
a.
l l
il it

Lights Out?
A Fuse Blown
Cait the
iietroit i son
Off'ice
Should a Luse blow in your lioine, office
or store; telephone. the Detroit 1'd'icon
office and a mlan -will be on hand InI a
Detr'oiit Edison ise and toble men lat
Ann Arbor are available ft-oln 7 -A, ยข1,to
10 P.M. to answer your call. They will
install a new fuse and make minor rya.
pairs to prevent the fuse blowvixg -agaill
T his is part of our general
customer service for which

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BEET WHEELER in i

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