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January 13, 1933 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-01-13

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HE MICHIGAN DAILY

1 2 .

~;

they have the.opportunity.to.reside in the frater-
nities, the upper classmen in the houses have
no way of forcing them to do so,
The administration should be satisfied because
it is keeping first year men with poor grades out
of the houses, a procedure which it has always
advocated, and also because the responsibility for
deciding where first year men shall live has been
given to the parent.
Lastly, the parent should be satisfied because
he, in. the last analysis, can determine what his
.on is to do.
nity Council for it's very sane compromise and
we urge the Senate Conimittee to pass a meas-
ure that will make all factions content.

except Monday during
r Session by the Boar

.tasct with those in the acute or convalescent stage,
It is quite a human and charitable act to visit the
sick, but in this disease, it may be reasonably ex-
pected that you will contract the disease by the
visit to the sick room.
The "chronic cougher" is also too prevalent and
careless in association with other not afflicted. He
should stay at home,, until this symptom is alle-
viated, obtain competent medical advice, and at
least cover the mouth and nose when coughing.
Sleeping rooms are most comfortable at tem-
peratures not higher than 65 degrees Fahrenheit.
Living and working rooms are found to be most
comfortable at temperatures of about 70 degrees
Fahrenheit for the normal human. Temperatures
higher than this cause undue perspiration, thus
going immediately out-doors from over heated
air to a low temperature causes a mechanical
thermal irritation to the mucous membranes of
the nose and throat, and outer surface of. the
body. In this way a predisposing condition is set
up for the more ready development of germs
causing infections of nose and throat.
Some thought should be given to the weight
of clothing; in variable winter temperatures, it
should be of sufficient weight to prevent chilling
of the skin surfaces of the body. To increase re-
sistance, obtain adequate sleep, regulate habits,
avoid fatigue, and partake of an adequate bal-
anced diet.
-Health Service

the
d in

Do you realize that this would be +a poor
world without FLOWERS; that there would
he no joy, nothing but a barren waste-
It's FLOWERS that brighten your life and make things
worth while. Your table, without FLOWERS looks cold
and desolate, no matter how good the food. . . Your
rooms are cheerless if no Flowers are in evidence to
brihgten them . . . Flowers are often the means of help-
ing cure the sick. . . Flowers express your sympathy for
the bereaved more than words . . . Flowers express your
congratulations for the new arrival . . . Flowers are
necessary at all times. (
The University Flower Shop, Inc., is always supplied
with the freshest of the season's blooms at reasonable
prices. Seasonable plants fresh from the hothouses.
THEY GROW THEIR OWN
T HE U NIVE RSITY F LOWE R SHOP, INC.
Phone 9055 606 East Liberty St.
MEMBER OF THE FLORIST'S TELEGRAPH ASSOCIATION-
Flowers wired anywhere any time.

11

ee Editorial Associa-

r
P 12
P% .

The. ,Theatre

ER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
;ed Press is exclusively entitled to the use
on of all news dispatches credited to it or
credited in this paper and the local news
in. All rights of republication of special
reserved.
he Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
natter. Special rate of postage granted by
t Postmaster-General.
during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
lent Publications Building, Maynard Street,
chigan. Phone: 2-1214.
ves: College Publications Representatives,
Thirty -Fourth Street, New York City; 80
et, Boston; 812 North Michigan Avenue,
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
)ITOR...............FRANK B..GILBRETH
...........KARL SEIFBT
O ...........JOHN W. THOMAS
TOR.................MARGARET O'BRIEN
OMEN'S EDITOR........MIRIAM CARVER

THE AUTHOR OF "ANNA 'CHRISTIE":
HIS LIFE-BY MORTON FRANK,
Recognized peer of American playwrights is Eu-
gene O'Neill, author of Anna Christie. which is to
be present-ed at 8:30 tonight and tomorrow night
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre by The Hillel
Players. Winner 'of the Pulitzer prize for his
Beyond the Horiton, author of internationally
produced plays (Anna Christie was his first play
to be produced on the Continent and in England),
seaman, prospector and newspaper reporter
among other occupations, he has lived the ma-
terial for his drama.

i
5
1

1, Norman F. Kraft,
tan, C. Hart Schaaf,

TANTS: L. Ross Bain, Fred A. Huber,
n, Harold Wolfe.
Hyman J. Aronstam, Charles Baird, A.
rles G. Barndt, James L. Bauchat, Donald
;harles B. Brownson, Arthur W. Carstens,
ilter, William G. Ferris, Sidney Frankel,
n C. Healey, Robert B. Hewett, George M.
oer E. Morrison, Edwin W. Richardson,
iGeorge Van Vleck, Guiy M. Whipple, Jr.,
White.
ning, Barbara Bates, Marjorie E. Beck,
um, Maurine Burnside, Ellen Jane Cooley,
all, Dorothy Dishman, Anne Dunbar,
Carol J. Hanan, Lois Jotter, Helen Levi-
J. Manchester, Marie J. Murphy, Eleanor
;aret D. Phalan, Katherine Rucker, Harriet
e Western.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
GER....... -..BYRON C. VEDDER
sER.......... ... ...HARRY BEGLEY
NESS MANAGER........DONNA BECKER
MANAGERS: Advertising, Grafton Sharp;
ntracts, Orvil Aronson; Advertising Serv-
er; Accounts, Bernard E. Schnacke; Cr-
ert E. Bursley; Publications, Robert E.

Born the son of the romantic actor James
O'Neill, he spent the first seven years of his life
touring the United States, after which he schooled
for six- years in various Catholic boarding schools
and for four years at Betts Academy in Cincin-
nati; He entered Princeton with the class of 1910,
only to be expelled after a year's study for an in-
fraction of college discipline.
Followed years as secretary of a mail-order
house, prospecting as companion of a mining en-
gineer in the Spanish Honduras, and managing
his father's travelling show. When his urge for the
sea, strengthened by the reading of Conrad and
Jack London, asserted itself, he sailed for Buenos
Aires on a Norwegian barque., After two years in
South America, he returned to New York, where
he lived at "Jimmy-the-Priest's," a liquor resort
on the waterfront that he used as his locale for
the first act of Anna Christie. Came then his last
experience on the sea, as a seaman on the Amer-
ican steamers New York and Philadelphia.
Advancing the school of experience as the best
school of writing, O'Neill does give some credit to
Baker's famous "47 Workshop" at Harvard for the
maturity of his early writings. Like some con-
temporary American playwrights, his first plays
received production in the theatre of the Prov-
incetown Players, laboratory of the "higher"
drama.-
O'Neill's most recent play, Mourning Becomes
Electra, has created a stir in literary circles. His
Strange Interlude broke records for length of per-
formances, while his Beyond the Horizon won him
the Pulitzer prize. Other plays of his include
The Hairy Ape, = The Great God Brown, Dynamo,
and Desire Under the Elms..

Sicre en, Reflecti ons
Four stars means extraordinary; three stars very
good; two stars good; one star just another picture;
no stars keep awvay from it.
AT THE MAJESTIC
"SECOND HAND WIFE"
* *A MEDIOCRE TYPE OF
A LOVE TRIANGLE DRAMA
Carter Cavendish ........ Ralph Bellamy
Alexandra Trumbull ........ Sally Eilers
Betty Cavendish .......... Helen Vinson
Little Patsy... ...........Karol Kay
The story is'a whirl of marriage, divorce, birth,
death, in modernistic executive offices and around
tea tables in palatial mansions. Alexandra Trum-
oull is a typist and winner of a popularity contest
whose affections are directed toward her boss,
Zarter Cavendish. On the other hand, Cavendish,
for the sake of his lovely daughter, has been
trying to escape a divorce from his wife. How-
ever, when he is found too often in the company
of "Sandra," a separation is inevitable. Caven-
dish carries' on a half-hearted fight to get his
daughter away from her mother and a rigid rou-
dine of violin practicing.
A little girl, 11 years old, comes through during
the last 30 minutes of "Second Hand Wife" and
almost steals the show away from Ralph Bellamy
and Sally .ilers. It is almost worth seeing the
picture if only to watch diminutive Karol Kay act.
Added attractions: "Sherlock's Home," a fair
,omedy with Jack Haley, who is a cross between
Harold Lloyd and Ed Wynn; Hearst News; "Pass-
ing the Buck" with Alexander Gray, and others.
There is some fair singing and good tap dancing
by four brothers. Alex Gray is hardly noticeable.
-A. E. B.
STARS

CUT PRICE SPECIALS
FOR FRIDAY AND SATURDAY

: { ..

65c Pond's
COLD
CREAM
49r
50c
ProphylactIc
Tooth Brushes
39c

KLEENEX
1 oc.

25c Johnson's
BABY
TALCQM
12c'

65c Pond's
VANISHING
CREAM
49c
1.00
AUTO STROP
BLADES
79c
35c William's
SHAVING
CREAM
27c
packages for 25c

'
I

.Find your new room for
the second semester with-
out interfering with your
exams ... Let the Classi-
fied columns of the Daily
find it for you . .

C ALA
The Ad.-Taker

cordon Boylan; Allen Cleve-
Efr'oymson, Fred' Hertrick,
Russell Read, Fred Rogers,
tdow, Robert Ward.
tt, Beulah Chapan, IDoris
dina Hartz Catherine Me-
Schmude, May 'seefried,

50c Kolynos100
Kooyh PsASPIRIN
39t TABLETS
49c
CAMELS, CHESTERFIELDS, OLD GOLDS
and LUCKY STRIKES............2

at

2 -1214

FRIDAY, JAN. 13, 1933
r'. Comstocks Answers
ie Will Of The People ..
A SHORT TIME AGO a lame duck
Congressman, who had been dis-
ed in the November elections, yielded up his
in favor of his successor, in order that the
res of his constituents might be furthered as
kly as possible. Now comes another example
wift accommodation of the people's will: Gov-
ir Comstock will parole first-term dry 'offend-
in deference to the overwhelming wet senti-
t as expressed at the Michigan polls.
ie Governor had promised to do this imme-
ely upon learning of his election. He has
ed no time in carrying out his proposal. "The'
e," he says, "should not hold liquor law pris-
s in view of the repudiation of this law in
November election. I ntend to free those in-
es of Jackson, Ionia, and Marquette prisons as
i as possible."
)me persons may ask whether this move is as
as, at first glance, it appears to be. Those
risoned violated a standing law of the state;
fact that the law has since been repealed
not in the slightest degree alter that fact.
laws of the state of Michigan, or of any
r state, so long as they are existent, should be
ected in fact if not in sentiment; and any
sncy extended to a violator of a law, no mat-
how unpopular that law may have been, is
iucive to disregard of other laws by persons
may erroneously conceive them to be un-;
alar.
appears, however, that the governor recog-
s this element of the situation. He has limited
paroles to first-term prisoners who have no
r law violation on their records. It is conceiv-°
that, in many cases, these offenders were not
.ly aware of the significance of their offense.
his connection, it is a further credit .to the
'etion of Governor Comstock that he will act
ach individual case on its merits.
a the basis of its intrinsic advisability, per-
this act of the governor's should not be par-
arly lauded; but he is doing a wise and meri-
us thing in so promptly following the wishes
e majority as expressed in the elections.

SWIFT'S DRUG STORE
340 South State Street

% i

WE DELIVER,

PHONE 3534

y.

-I ' ii

Student HeOafth.
ACUTE INFLUENZA
For the past five wee's, an epidemic (popularly
known as acute influenza or La Grippe) has
steadily spread over the country. The majority of
the cases are mild, but figures to date indicate
:pore persons affected than in recent years.
The disease gains entrance into the, body
Ljhrough nose and throat and may affect any'
portion of the respiratory system, from the nose
.o the lungs, where it causes an acute inflamma-
,ion.
The symptoms, most commonly complained of
>y victims, are cough, headache, general body
>ains and weakness. The body pains are de-
scribed as aching or soreness in the muscles and
joints. Sore throat and vomiting attacks are also
ommon symptoms. Fever usually is present, tern-
>erature often reaching as high as 101 degrees to
L03 degrees during the first two, days of the ill-.
less, but it quickly drops to normal in five or six
.:lays, providing the patient has reasonable medical
and nursing care, and develops no complications.
The disease itself is seldom fatal (except in the
;ery young and aged persons). However, it does
)ave the way for severe complications, and other
:liseases particularly pneumonia. Common compli-
rations are acute infection of the ears (otitis)
cute infection of the sinuses (sinusitis) and mas-
'oid bones (mastoiditis).
Complications frequently occur in those persons
who "try to stay on the job," "keep going" al-
hough suffering from the disease; also in those
vho resume their occupations, social functions,
.trenuous exercise too soon following an attack
:f the disease and before body strength has re-
turned.
The best treatment to date, for the victims of
;he ailment, is to go to bed, and stay there until
.ll symptoms subside. Treatment of the severe
symptoms and general care is best supplied by
'our physician, and is necessary to shorten the
duration of the disease and to support those who
are seriously ill Water should be taken freely,
at least a glassful every one or two hours. It re-
.noves toxic substances, -produced by the disease
from. the body. Liquid foods and drinks are also
given, orangeade, lemonade, milk, broths, malted
nilk, tea, coffee,:which also supply some nourish-
:ent. Later, soft foods are added, as the patient's
appetite improves.
Convalescence is usually rapid in the patient,
,ho has been under adequate medical and nursing
,are. Cough and weakness are the usual distress-
ing, symntoms. that nersist during convalescene.

&

STRPES

By Karl Seifer
Over in Indiana they want to legalize the sale
of beer and make home brewing illegal, Why don't
they hold out for complete repeal and see if. they
can't dry up the state entirely?
The beer control bill, says a dispatch, would
"follow in the wake of repeal." It'll be a wake,
all right, if' Congress doesn't make up its mind
about the thing pretty soon.
SENV1rE MOVES
TO STRENGTHEN
HOUSE BEER BIL
-Headline
The wringing wets would like to see some-
thing like that done to the beverage itself.
In order to satisfy the requests of Democratic
state officials that they be given the low auto
license numbers customary for the vehicles of of-
Tice holders, the secretary of state has ordered
a new series of plates made. There's going to be
in awful mess when they all try to get their
names first in the Lansing telephone book.
In Cleveland, Sheriff John M. Sulzman wants
,o know how he can keep prisoners locked up in
.he $2,500,000 county jail when the walls are so
soft that the inmates can dig out chunks. of con-
,rete with their hands. That's easy-feed them.
BANK'S 1-932 BUSINESS
THE BEST IN 54 YEARS
-Headline
We'd rather see that worked out on paper.
*' * *
A Georgetown, Ind., banker has installed an
electric door-opener 'on his bank, which is open
>nly to acquaintances of the president, You re-
nember me-I -was here with Joe Smith last
Tuesday.
A British railway is reported to have inaugu-
-ated "electrified service" on its main line. These
porters will do anything for a tip.
- * *
HOCKEY CROWD
TTS NEW nW

Bothered By
Borrowers,,,

You really can't blame them for wanting to read
your Daily... It's the best means of keeping up
with the titnes ... AssociatedPress News, Sports
News, Social News. . . in fact, everything that
the campus cares about... but you'll save yourself
some trouble and the borrower some money by
showing him this... The Daily is now...
DELIVERED FOR THE REST
OF THE YEAR
OP T ,V W% 1TP1 V 1M T" TT~v A 4- 1\TC9 nT IVY TTWT Y-

III

III

esolutio* That

Everyone.

" "

T HE 'RESOLUTION passed last
night by the Interfraternity Coun-
in regard to the ruling prohibiting first year
1 from living in fraternity houses should sat-
everyone.
he administration, the parent, the freshman.,
the fraternity man would be benefited by
h a successful compromise measure.
he resolution asks the Senate Committee on
dent Affairs to allow pledges to live in the

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