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January 05, 1933 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-01-05

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

UILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
ation in the Bulletin is constructive notic to all members of the
rsity. Copy received at the office of the Assistant to the President until
11:30 a. m. Saturday.

W. E. Lay Will
Present Paper
Before Society'
Association of Autolmotive

War Clouds, Crime Wave, Highlights 0

r

. L II[

THURSDAY, JANUARY 5, 1933

N6. 72

Past Year Is Marked By
De-nocratic Landslide,
Crises In Germany And

NOTICES
Faculty Concert: Maud Okkelberg, Assistant Professor of Piano of the
School of Music, will give the following program in Hill Auditorium, Sunday
a4ternoon, January 8, at 4:15 o'clock, to which the general public with the
'eception of small children is invited: Bach-Busoni: Chaconne; N. Medt-
'net: Sonate-Ballade, Op. 27, Allegretto, Introduzione Finale; Chopin: Bal-
lade, Op. 52; Ravel: LaVallee des Cloches; Liapounow: Terek.
Air.Transportation: Students who purchased air transportation from
W. K. Richards, Michigan Southern Airways Company, or the Detroit Air
Charter Service prior to the Christmas holidays, and who have not already
reported the matter to this office are requested to call at Room 2, Univer-
sity Hall, as soon as possible. J. A. Bursley, -Dean of Students
Summer Session Abridged Announcement: Copies of the Campus Edi-
tion of the Abridged Announcement of the courses to be given during the
summer of 1933 may be 6biafie~d at the iegistration offices of all schools
anl colleges.
School of Education Comprehensive Examination: The next compre-
hensive examination in Education will be held Saturday morning, January
21, at 9 o'clock sharp in the auditorium of the University High School. All
students expecting to take the examination at that time should leave their
nes immediately with Miss Clark in the Recorder's office of the School
of Education, Room 1437 U. Elementary School.
C. 0. Davis, Secretary
Sophomore Cabaret: All women who took part in cabaret dances may
receive a refund of their deposit at Miss McCormick's office in the League
today between 4 and 5.
ACADEMIC NOTICES
English 245. (L. 1. Bredvoldi): This class will meet on Friday, Jan. 6,
at 3 p. in. in.Room 3227 A.H.
Geology 31: Bluebook Friday at the lecture hour. A-L (inclusive) meet
in Room 25 A.H. M-Z meet in Room 2082 N.S., the Mineralogical Lecture
Room. All laboratory sections will meet next week,
EVENTS TODAY
Special Assembly for all students enrolled in Education classes in the
University High School Auditorium at 4:10, Thursday, January 5. The pro-.
am will be presented by students in the Correlated Course.
Observatory Journal Club will meet at-4:15 in the Observatory lecture
roomh. Dr. A. D. Maxwell will speak on the subject "Some Innovations in
Orbit Methods." Tea will be served at 3:45.

Engineers Will Meet
Book-Cadillac

Tn

Far Eastern Countries

"The Air Resistance of Motor Ve-
hicles" is the title of a paper to be
presented by Prof. W. E. Lay, of the
mechanical engineering department,
at the annual meeting of the SocietyI
of Automotive Engineers which will
be held Jan. 23 to 26 at the Book-
Cadillac hotel in Detroit.
The paper is the result of more
than a year's research by Professor
Lay and various graduate students
who assisted in the work. Over 30
wooden models were tested in the

Historic events in the Far East and'
in Germany and the sensational
Lindbergh -kidnapping and niurder
coming as the climax of a crime wave
which sent America's leading "pub-
lic enemy." Al Capone, to a cell in a
Federal prison marked 1932 as a year
of great importance both to histor-
ians and journalists.
The great depression continued
into its fourth year. sending Herbert
Hoover into political oblivion and;
elevating Franklin Roosevelt and the
Democratic party to unparalleled
power. The war debt debacle came to
a crisis with the default of France.
Following is a chronological ac-
count of the year's events.
NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL
EVENTS;

6
lini
9
to
1
fee
1
ma
at
ed.
un
de
r
Sn
J u
Ce
tei

-Attempt to assassinate Musso-
-Fr. Cox arrives in Washington
lead veterans.
0-Fr. Coughlin gives $5,000 to
d veterans.
3-England protests death of
id in Lindbergh case.
4-Republican convention opens
Chicago.
16-Hoover and Curtis renominat-
17-Senate rejects bonus, 60-18.
21-Sharkey gets boxing title in
ipopular decision.
2-Sharkey fight investigation or-
red.
27-Democratic convention opens.
29-Democrats adopt repeal plank.
30-Names of Roosevelt, Gamer,n
pith given convention.
ly
1-Roosevelt wins nomination.
2-Roosevelt flies to Chicago, ac-
pts nomination.
6-Versailles debts scrapped.
11-Curtis gets one-year prison
:m in Lindbergh hoax.
13-Fire sweepshConey Island.
20-Government troops take Ber-

5-House ddfeatsi'epeal by six
votes.
6-Hoover urges sales tax in mes-
sage.
14-France votes to default on
debt.
15-Burns, chain gang fugitive., ar-
rested again.
20-G. 0. P. leadership goes to
Cduzens. .
21-Governor Moore, New Jersey,
refuses to extradite Burns.
28--Roosevelt says "no" to sales
tax.
DEATh S
January-Julius Rosenwald, Lyt-
ton Strachey, Eddie Stinson, William
Wrigley.
. Febiuary-Edgar Wallace, Minnie
Maddern Fiske.
March-John Philip Sousa, Aris-
tide Briand; IvarĀ° Kreuger, George
Eastman, Henry M. Leland.

April-William Burns. Gen. Uri-
Euru.
May-Paul Doumer, Charles A.
Lildlergh. Jr.. Tsuyoshi Inukai,
Capt. Robert Dollar. Edward F.
Swift.
Junc--Hugh Chalmers, Alexander
Winton.
July-Smith Reynolds, King Gil-
lette, Jules Jusserand, Florenz Zieg-
feld.
August-Msgr. Seipel, Ray Gra-
ham. James Francis Burke.
Scpteniber--Jesse Pomeroy.
October- Representative Linthi-
cuin, Jessie Bonstelle. -
November-William S. Brock, Sen.
Wesley L. Jones.
December-Norman Mack.
Black bear in sufficient number to
eliminate the necessity of restocking
have been found in the Great Smoky
Mountains national park.

wind tunnel of the East Engineering
Building in the attempt to design an
automobile that would combine prac-
ticability with minimum air resist-
ance.
The sessions will include papers
and discussions on such subjects as
transportation and maintenance,
motor coaches and motor trucks, die-
sel engines, aircraft engines, air-
planes, passenger cars, chassis de-
velopment, and other technical
phases of automobile mechanics.
The annual dinner of the S. A. E.
will be held on Jan. 11 at the Penn-
s ylvania hotel in New Yorkcity,
Charles Kettering, prominent engi
Ineer, will act as toastmaster.

I

I

.CLASSIFIED 'DIRECTORY

I

i
}

January
4-Japanesearmy enters Chin-
chow.
7-Ritchie announces presidential
candidacy.
9-Al Smith, John W. Davis, and
James M. Cox speak at Jackson Day
banquet.
22-Justice Holmes resigns.
16--Coxey announces candidacy
for Presidency.
20-House passes Reconstruction

3I

s.

i
i

A. T. CU.. E., Student Branch regular meeting at 7:30 p. m. in Room
3205 E. Eng. Bldg. Dr. Malcolm Soule will talk on "Bacteriology" which be-
Sides its general interest, is of special interest in many fields of chemical
.egineering. The A. I. CH. E. award for highest scholarship during fresh-
manyear will also be made at this meeting.
Varsity Glee Club will meet promptly at 7:30.
Rifle Team Meeting: Important meeting of all the R. O. T. C. rifle
'tear members and prospective members in the R. O. T. C. building at 7:00
p. m.
Mrs. Frederick B. Fisher will speak at the Fireside Hour discussion
group at 4 o'clock in Wesley Hall. All those who are interested are cordially
:nvited.
Michigan Dames: The Music-- Group will meet at the home of Mrs.
David Clinger-Smith, 1004 Forest Avenue, at 8 p. m. Music of the British
sles will be the theme of the program.
Comedy Club: Important meeting for all members at 4 o'clock in the
League. Look on bulletin board for the room.
COMING EVENTS-
Sigma Xi will meet Tuesday, January 10, at 8 p. it. in the Geology Lec-
ture Room, 2054 Natural Science Bldg. After informal talks by Dean Kraus
and Professors Hobbs and Ehlers, exhibits prepared by the Departments of
deology and Mineralogy will be inspected. Refreshments.
Philippine-Michigan Club banquet and program in honor of the na-
tional hero, Jose Rizaly Mercado, Friday, January 6, at Michigan League,
630;p.im.
Liberal Students Union: Discussion on modern social conditions in Rus-
sia, led by Mr. Maurice Sugar of Detroit. Unitarian church, 7:30 p. m.,
Sunday, followed by refreshments. At the morning church service Mr. Mar-
le will speak on "How Sacred is the Bible?"

Bang-Up Train
Stopper Quits
Goober Special
ATLANTA, Jan. 4.-(/P)---The glory,
of the Goober Special, an accommo-
dating accommodation, has been
written in time tables and now comes
B. H. Morris, who pulled its throttle
for 35 years, with a claim he started
ad stopped it about 4,000,000 times
during its life. That makes him the
champion train stopper, or some-
thing.
The Goober Special-so named be-
cause its passengers just about ate
their weight in peanuts-ran between
Atlanta and Social Circle, Ga. It
made almost a hundred stops in a
hundred miles, or 200 stops per day a
round trip. The Georgia railroad has
discontinued the fussy little train
and retired Morris-its only pilot.
Funny Whistle
It was one of those friendly little
trains with a funny whistle that toot-
ed for every farm. Morris often held
the special if they were a bit late.
When cows or mules strayed on the
tracks, Morris would halt the train
until his fireman drove the stock to
safety by heaving coal their way.
Once his cow catcher hit a yearling
and tossed it on the right-of-way
where it struck and killed two cows.
Morris likes to tell about the time
he helped a friend who wanted to get
a keg of beer home without his fath-
er-in-law knowing about it. The en-
gineer agreed to slow the Goober
Special and let the fellow kick off
the keg at an isolated spot. The spe-
cial was slowed all right and the fel-
low kicked the keg but it bounced
down an embankment and tore
across a cornfield. The beer ruined
the corn. The two never would mix.
lie Had to Jump
Morris was nosing his train
through a fog one day when a freight
engine loomed before him. He cut his,
steam and jumped. He says he heard
the collision as he tumbled down an
embankment and looked up just in
time to see a pair of pilot trucks
start down the incline after him. The
trucks chased him for 50 yards. Back
at the wreck he discovered the en-
gineer of the freight train was his
brother-in-law and the two firemen
also were brothers-in-law. None was
hurt.
He began railroading in the days
of the wood-burning locomotives.
Firemen then handled the wood with
bare hands because the splinters cut
leather gloves to ribbons. Bare skin
was no tougher than leather, but it
was cheaper.
'Pir-suers' SocieLy

bill.
23-Reconstruction Finance Act
goes into force.
26-Eddie Stinson dies after plane
crash.
28-Crisis in <hina as Japanese
take Shanghai.
30-China mobilizes for war.

February
2-Powers demand end of fighting
tn China. '
3-Severe earthquake in Cuba.
5-Russians battle Japanese on
border.
9-Winnie Ruth Judd found guilty
'n trunk slayings.
11-Ford announces V-8 model.
l3--Stock~s soar on market.
16-Cardozo appointed new Su-
nreme Court justice to succeed
Holmes.
19-China rejects Japanese ulti=
matum.
24-Campbell sets new speed mark
7f 245 m. p. h.
March
1-Japanese drive Chinese back.
2-Lindbergh baby kidnapped.
6-Police give Spitale free rein in
Lindbergh case.
7-Four die in Ford riot.
9-Lindbergh baby reported home;
subsequently denied.
13-Hlindenburg swamps Hitler in
German election; falls short of ma-
jority.
16-Roosevelt wins in North Da-
kota urimary.
17-Germans nip Fascist plot.
30-House passes auto and luxuries
taxes.
April!
2--Seven Americans slain by Mex-
ican raiders.
10-Lindbergh pays so-called "kid-
nappers" $50,000.
18-Cardinal O'Connell rebukes
Fr. Coughlin, Detroit "radio pastor."
21-Toni Mooney denied pardon.
27-Smith takes Massachusetts,
2-1; Roosevelt has slight lead in
Pennsylvania.
28-Heflin loses Senate fight.
30-Four Honolulu defendants
found guilty of manslaughter.
May
2-Capone denied review by Su-
preme Court.
4--Defendants in Massie case par-
doned.
6-President Doumer of France,
shot by Russian, dies.
9--Japanese buy munitions in Eng-
land.
12-Lindbergh baby found dead.
14-New York beer parade; others
in other cities.
16--Premier Inukai of Japan as-
sassinated.
18-Arrest John Hughes Curtis for
Lindbergh hoax.
21-Bishop Gallagher defends Fr.
Coughlin,
21-Amelia Earhart crosses ocean;
Do-X follows.
30--German cabinet resigns.
June
1-"-Von Papen new German pre-
mier.
2-S c a b u r y demands Walker
ouster.

-SI
H
3'

epteniber
2-Walker resigns, assails Roose-
elt.
5-Gar Wood wins second heat of
[armsworth. retains trophy. .
.9--New York boat explosion kills
7.

lin.
23-Borah reverses stand on debts.
28-Riot breaks out in Washing-
ton; bonus marcher killed; martial
law declared.
29-Veterans driven from Wash-
ington.
31-Hitlerites fail to get majority
in Reichstag election.
August
7-Stocks rise rapidly on market.
11 - Hoover makes acceptance
speech; abandons. drys.
14-Hindenburg blocks Hitler; Na-
zis refuse coalition.
16-Farm picket in Iowa.
17-Piccard ascends to strato-
sphere.
22-Farmers stop trains in Iowa.
24-Farmers -release- xSioux City
livestock.
29-Smith spurns Roosevelt.
31-Total eclipse of sun.

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place adlvertisemnts with 6C1 lassified
AdvertisingDepartmnt. Pono 2-17l4.
The classified columns close at three
o'cloclk proviow to cday of insertion.
Boy zmbers Imay be secured at no
extra cliarge.
Cash in advane-11e per reading 1n0
(on bdsis of fire average words to
line) for one or two insertions.
Mi in un 3 line, pcr in'ertion.
10c per roading line for three or more
insertions.
Telephone rate-15c per reading line
for one or twlo inlsertions..
14, per readig line Loif three or more
insertions.
10'. discount 'If paid within ten days
from the tate of last insertion.
Minimum three hne per insertion.
By coutract, per line-2 lines daily, one
-n mn tl l................Sce
4 lines . 0. D.. 2 months.....,....c
2 lines daily, college year..........7c
4 lines . 0. D., college year........7c
100 ine u tsed a.,dclred..........c
300 tines used ;1 desired .,........8c
1,000 linus ed a:.dsrd ....7
2.000 lines used ~rtt ircd ., .. .6c.
The above rates are per reading line,
based on eight readiiig lines per inch.
Ionic typo;. "pper "w'd lower case. Add
6c per line to above mates for aI capital
letters. A1dd _ c per line to abaove for
h old Lace, upper and. lowter e ase. A(dd
10c per line to above rates for bold face
Th -ala o aites are for g : point type.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-First floor, four large
rooms refinished like new. Heat,
water, stove, electric refrigeration,
garage. 8311 S. Sta.te. 224
FOR RENT-Room $3.00 single or
$2.50 doUble. Near Angell Hall.
'Board if desired. Telephone 6404.
- - . -225
FOR RENT-Two attractive single
. rooms.' Well furnished and clean.
Steam heat, shower bath, south-
east section, for upperclassmen.
Board if desired, good variety and
fresh. , vegetables. Breakfast and
evening dinner. Phone 7796. 227

FOUND
FOUND-Elgin watch. Owner call
Wilcox at 2-1517 or 2-3677 any
noon and identify. 228
LAUNDRIES
LAUNDRY - Soft water. 2-1044.
-Towels free. Socks darned. 13c
WASHING-And ironing. Called for
and delivered. Silks and woolens
guaranteed satisfactory. 2-3478.
611 Hoover. 15
NOTICE
HOME-Cooked meals $4- a week.
Tables for ladies. 609 E. University.
222.
SEASONAL SUGGESTIONS - Wall
paper, paint. Samples, estimates.
Home Decorators since 1905. Dial
8107 or 7600. 30c-
HAVE-Your snap shots developed
at Francisco Boyce. 719 N. Univer-
sity. Here fine work is the tradi-
tion. 19c -
S. U.-Shoe Repair Shop. Repairing
while you wait. Reasonable -prices.
Hats cleaned and blocked. Shoes
shined. Open evenings. 199c
BARGAINS-Overstuffed chairs $3
to $9. Davenports $10. Study tables
$2. Lamps $1. A & C Furniture,
325 8. Fifth Ave. .22c.
TYPING .
TYPING-Grad. theses a specialty.
M. V. Hartsuff, 9067.40c
TYPING--Notes, papers, and Grad.
Theses. C. Heckart, 3423. 35c

i

13-Maine goes Democratic in.
state election.
15-Legion drops Hoover censure;
demands bonus.
19-U. S. rebuffs German arms de-
mand.
20=Gar Wood breaks speedboat
record.
26--Schmeling knocks out Walker,
in 8th round.
29-Progressives organize cam-
paign group.
October -
2-Roosevelt speaks at Detroit;
Yanks sweep World Series.
5-Smith and.Roosevelt reconciled.
6-Smith, Roosevelt unite against{
Mayor James J. Walker,
9-Durant supports Roosevelt.
10--Lippmann supports Roosevelt.
13-Stagg resigns at Chicago. r
19-Ford broadcasts appeal for
Hoover.
22-Hoover talks in Detroit.
24-Smith's first speech at New-

FOR SALE
FOR SALE-.-Tuxedo suit, size about
36 or 37. Cheap and slightly worn.
Phone 8926. 229

I

aei
Now Playing!
Tiffany Tliayer't
Startling Noveil

I

ark.
28-Hiram Johnson assails Hoover
in declaration of Roosevelt Support.
31-Hoover says "grass will:- grow
in streets of 100 cities"- if Democ ts
win.

Matzek. Winner
Of Prize For
Goethe 'Essay
Work Termed So Mature
As To Cast Doubt On
Its Authenticity
An essay "so excellent and mature
in thought that the judges question-
ed the fact that it had been writ-
ten by an undergraduate won a prize
of $200 foir Thias F. Matzek, '33E.
The prize was, offered by the. Carl
Schurz Memorial Foundation for the
best 5,000-word essay on any one of
three assigned subjects relating to
the German poet, Goethe the hun-
dredth anniversary of whose death is
being -celebrated this year. Separate
prizes were given for essays in Ger-
ian and in English, Matzek's essay
was in German,
The judges had their doubts about
the authenticity of Matzek's essay, so
they, wired from New Haven, Conn.,
to Prof. John W. Eaton, head of the
German department, who proved to
be out of town at the time. They
then telephoned Dr. Louis A. Hop-
kins, secretary of the engineering col-
lege, who verified Matzek's record,
This is not the first essay contest
which Matzek has won, In 1390 he
woni the Thomas-Bronson German
prize of $50, with an essay on Theo-
dore Storm and his works.
Matzek's interest in Goche was
firs aroused by a course which he
took under Prof. Walter A. Reichart,
he explained. When he heard of the

Earth qake In
Alaska Is Felt
11 Washington
Seismographs Attempt To
Plot rfrem or's Course
Across Continent
SEATTLE, Jan. 4. - ) - Seismo-
logists of northwestern colleges
sought today to check the course of
a sharp earth tremor that frightened
citizens of Seward, Alaska, and was
felt in Washington state.
Gonzaga University of Spokane re-
ported the quake was recorded at the
Mount St. Michael observatory be-
tween 8:04 and 8:10 p. m. Tuesday.
Its center was estimated at a dis-
tance of 2,700 miles.<
Sevard reported a severe .jilocic of
20 seconds duration. It vibrated and
rattled portable objects, sending ter-
rifled residents into the streets. Di-
rection of the quake apparently was
west to east.
Seattle felt two distinct tremors at
about 5:20 and shortly after 10 p. m,
Residents said their houses were
swayed and furniture shaken up. One
man said pictures on the walls moved
visibly during the second shock.
L rofessor Pulblishes
Collection Of Lectures
Most recent among the publica-
tions of faculty members is the col-
lection of lectures on "The Engineer
In Modern Production" by Prof.

November
-2--Will Rogers, Lippmann assail
Hoover's "grass" statement. -
5-Roosevelt closes campaign.
8-Early , Rooseveltlead assumes
landslide. proportions; -Hoover .leads
in five states.
9-Democratic avalanche sweeps
country; Roosevelt carries,42 states.
13-Ford advocates free trade.
14--Hoover calls Roosevelt into
conference on wardebts. -
- 21-Hitler offered German chan-
cellorship.
24-Voodoo march staged in De-
troit in wake of sacrificial murder.
27--Ford undergoes major opera-
tion.
29-U. S. C. picked for Rose Bowl
game; Michigan favored as oppo-
nent.
December
2-Pitt picked to oppose U. S. C.
in Rose Bowl classic.

FOR SALE--Scottish terrier pup.
Ardmore strain. Phone 2-3462.
814 Hill Street. 221
FINANCE CO.-Is selling late model
ears for balance due. 311 W. Huron.
2,2001L 19c.
LOST
LOST - Brown gladstone bag. Re-
turn for reward 267 Jordan Hall.
226
LOST-Black cocker puppy. Answers
to, name "Skippy". -Reward. Dial
8125. 223

IS ANY WOMAN SAFE FROM
THE SPEl OF SUCH A WOMAN?

Michigan
NOW SHOWING

11

i

"CENTRAL
PARK"

Carries

On

ENFIELD, Conn., Jan. 4.-VP)-The
newly-elected "pursuers" have not
all provided "a fast horse" as speci-
fied il the ancient constitution, but
the EnficId Society for the Detection
of Thiev(s and Robbers is ready to'
carry on for its 111th year.,
The horse thief, whose activities
resulted in the organization's incep-
tion, is no longer a menace. Nearly
40 years have passed since criminal
pursuit activities were reported at
one of its annual meetings. Highly
organized police departments have
replaced the old citizens' detective
groups. But the local society con-
tinues.
Leaders of the community's busi-
ness and political life were elected to
the -"board of pursuers" at the recent
110th annual election. Activities of
the society are now almost purely
social.
It was organized Jan. 30, 1823, with

stolen from Thompson S. Grant, state
comptroller. That was one of the last
activities of that sort in which tIL
members participate d.
Many similar organizations were
formed in the state at the beginning
of the nineteenth century, but with
the passing of the horse thief they
have disbanded.
Ii- -

ii

,Corduroy
Pure Wool Lining
Slicker Innerlinng
Four Pockets -
Hockincycr Cord
CORDUROY SLACKS $2.45
SNAP BRIM HATS. .$2.95
TRENCH COATS. ..X.$2.95

JOAN WALLACE
BLONDELL FORD
GUY KIBBEE

Stirring Melodrama
- with

.Hollywood Runaround"
Monty - Collins comedy

rpm
F

"HI! HI! WESTERNER!"
Musical Brevity

LOUISE MARIE
FAZENDA PREVOST
"Hesitating Love"
ALEXANDER GRAY
"Red Shadow"
CAR TOON IN COLOR
HEARST NEWS

11

aNICKELETTE"
Novelty

Announcing the Opening of
-"tJE! e n fi kAW AIr1 I

II WALK A FEW STEPS Iill.

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