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November 23, 1932 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-11-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Hapgood ites
Administration
Of HisFactory
Conserve Company Head
Tells Forum Of Model
Care Given Employees
"No man has ever been discharged
from our factory, no worker has been
dismissed during times of depression
except for bad conduct, and there
have only been 16 or 17 cases of this
sort in 15 years" declared William
P. Hapgood, president of the Colum-
bia Conserve Company, at the forum
held in Lane Hall this week on An
Experiment in Industrial Democracy.
"Our company," saidhMr. Hap-
good, "is one in wich the workers
determine the policy of the business.
In 1917 we started to turn the oper-
ation and control of the business
over to the workers. They now own
64 per cent of the common stock as
an asset of the firm which bought
it through the surplus profits that
would ordinarily go to the capital-
"We take care of our old workers,"
Mr. Hapgood continued, "and the
company maintains a dentist and
doctor to take care of its workers."
He also explained after the first
year the dental care offered little
trouble or expense, but that the doc-
tor's bill for one person sometimes
amounted to as much as $1,500 for a
year, all of which is paid by the co-
pany.
"Giving the workers a share in the
business has increased production ef-
ficiency to a remarkable degree," said
Mr. Hapgood, "and we have not only
survived up to now, but intend to sur-
vive through the present economic
depression w1hout having to bring
about any reduction in the number
of our workers, for the workers them-
selves have declined to benefit them-
selves by any proposals to dismiss
some of the recently acquired la-
borers.'
State Official Commends
Radio Music Instruction
Special commendation was extend-
ed to the Broadcasting Service of the
University by the advisory council on
music of the State Department of
Public Instruction, it was announced
yesterday.
In a letter to Prof. Waldo M. Ab-
bot, director of the service, Ada Bick-
ing, who is in charge of music edu-
cation throughout the state, express-
ed the appreciation of the council for
the "~music instruction now being
rendered to the schools of the state
who are not favored with regular
music instructors," and made a plea
for the continuation of the lessons.
The music instruction of the
broadcasting service consists, of a
program of instruction in the playing
of band instruments every Monday
afternoon. The series of lessons is
conducted by Prof. James E. Maddy,
of the division of fine arts, whose
lessons are followed by more than
5,000 students throughout the state,
according to Professor Abbot. l
A total of 546,433 telephones was
installed in Sweden at the end of
1931.

Schorling Discusses
Choosing Of Teachers
Full responsibility foi the selection
of teachers in local schools should be
delegated to the superintendent of
schools, who should be made entirely
responsible for his choice, according
to Prof. Raleigh Schorling of the
School of Education, who spoke Sun-
day on the subject "What Part
Should the Public Play in the Selec-
tion of Teachers?" over the facilities
of the University Broadcasting Serv-
ice on a program broadcast from sta-
tion WJR, Detroit.
Professor Schorling outlined sev-
eral principles which he said are det-
rimental to the choice of good teach-
ers. The first principle which he at-
tacked was the principle of looking
at a vacancy on the teaching staff
of the local school as a convenient
device for giving livelihood to some-,
body. "The school should not be re-
garded as an instrument of welfare
or charity," he said.
"The second practice which cuts
down the chances of getting the best
teacher for the money," said Profes-
sor Schorling, "is the tendency to
give preference to local candidates.

There is a growing sectionalism de-
veloping in many communities. Even
if we assume that localism in busi-
Iness is a desirable practice, it is ob-
vious that on educational matters we
must learn to co-operate in large
units. We dare not built an empire of
each small city with a high protec-
tive tariff on cultural and educa-
tional matters.
"The third objectional practice is
allowing teachers to underbid each
other. In normal times the law of
supply and demand for teachers is
no doubt the best principle, but un-
employed teachers, like others, tend
to become panicky. Your community
should make up its mind what it is
going to pay and then secure the
best possible teacher for the money
from the open market."
COTTON TO REPLACE OPIUM
SIANFU, China, Nov. 22.-(R)-!
Farmersarebeing urged by the
Shensi provincial government to plant
American cotton instead of the
opium poppy. Formerly Shensi grew
6,000 tons of cotton annually but
production has dropped by two-
thirds.

A Real
Thanksgiving Dinner
with "All the Trimmings"
12:00 - 7:30 P.M.
AT
CHUBB' IS
Ann Arbor's Largest Restaurant
E.stablished 1899
ROAST TURKEY, CHICKEN,
or LONG ISLAND DUCKLINGS, at c
and as usual
Our Regular 50c Dinner will be served.
Dance Orchestra at 11:00 and 6:00
ARDIS MAE CABARET
ENTERTAINMENT
Sunday Evening 6:00 - 11:00

III

Enjoy Thanksgiving

This Year

M

at

The Michigan Union
Members may reserve tables for themselves and
guests by calling 415 1. Dinner will be served from
1:00 to 3:00 and from 6:00 to 7:30. The follow-
ing menu will be served for $1.00.

Chilled Grape Juice
Fresh Shrimp Cocktail
Hot or Jellied Consomme
Cream of Fresh Tomato, Carolina

Branch Celery

Mixed Olives

Sweet Pickles

Spiced Watermelon
Fried Oysters, Tartar Sauce, Saratoga Chips

THANKS GIVING

FLOWERS

SENIOR PICTURES
By a Reliable Firm Producing
Quality Portraits for 43 Years

Graced by Flowers, no table is ever barren. When their subtle
fragrance is missing, the banquet becomes just an ordinary meal.
Flowers are as necessary to the enjoyment of your Thanksgiving
dinner as is the food you prepare for your guests, so be sure that
you do not neglect this item.
A Note to the Ladies-
Flowers move right up to the chin when worn on the street
this year. They cling smartly to high-throated collars, scarfs and
furs. The University Flower Shop, Inc., have a large assortment
of all the seasonable cut blooms. They will have a continuous
supply of Gardenias, Violets, Roses, Carnations and Sweetpeas.
They specialize in corsages, table centers and floral arrange-
ments for all purposes.

Roast Suckling Pig, Apple Dressing
Roast Native Turkey, Nut Dressing, Cranberry Sauce
T-Bone Steak Saute, Maitre D'Hotel
Orange Fritter, Sweet Sauce
Mashed Potatoes Green Peas in Butter
Candied Sweet Potatoes Mashed Squash
Steamed Onions
Frozen Punch
Hawaiian Salad, Mint Wafers
Hot Mince Pie
Pumpkin Pie, Whipped Cream
English Plum Pudding, Hard Sauce
Vanilla or Maple Nut Ice Cream
Corn Muffins French Bread Dinner Rolls
Sweet Cider Coffee Tea Milk
YouUr Unio

A!tc -Mww

THEY GROW THEIR OWN

Portraits from These Negatives
Make Ideal Xmas Gifts

Flowers Delivered Anywhere on Short Notice
Member of the Florist's Telegraph Association
UNIVERSITY FLOWER SHOP, Inc.
Flowers Fresh Daily fromOur Own Greenhouse
606 E. Liberty St., Phone 9055

Studio
319 East Huron

Since 1890
Dial 5541

THE DAILY CLASSIFIED ADS PAY

I.

_________ _______________ _________________________________

STATIONERY SPECIAL
For One Week We Are Offering -
1 POUND MONTAG'S CRUSHED PARCHMENT
WITH 2 PACKS ENVELOPES TO MATCH
49c

fing erie,'s

special

WAHR'IS

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

thanksgiving
dinners

316 State Street

PE ,i

.._ __..
__._ I

Th A tIYN Sh
524-53i E. Liberty StAMichigan Theatre Bldg.,

OUR 13th
SEMI-AN N UAL

Today!
Friday!
Saturday.

CHOICE
OF THE HOUSE
DRESS SALE

75c

75c

g

OVER 400 BEAUTIFUL NEW

BU.ILDING
GOODWILL

DRESSES

MAKING
NEW FRIENDS

$

80 CHOICE
OF THE

$

80

* if you want a real delightful home-cooked thanksgiv-
ing dinner, by all means go to fingerle's .
* here you will find a feast of good things with none of
the time-honored trimmings omitted and without'
the worry and work entailed in preparing a sumptuous
meal.
*whether you dine alone or with your family and friends,
thanksgiving dinner at fingerle' s will be even more
enjoyable and a lot less expensive than if you dined at
home!
e the tavern cafeteria serves a sixty cent thanksgiving
dinner . . . you save even more by waiting on yourself!

7

HOUSE

SPORT FROCKS - AFTERNOON FROCKS - SUNDAY NITES

i

1111

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