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November 23, 1932 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-11-23

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A~l 14" IV! 1 C, 11.DAG AY

_1,a

MICHIGAN DAILY
Established 1890

N l -
9 ,q I - . u T ' I f n_ } r
Published every morning except Monday during the
University yerad nSPbi aneSession by the Board in
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
tion and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published ereir. All rights of republication of special
clispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General,
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$150. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by.
mail, $4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Bulding, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publishers Representatives.
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylston Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STARF
Telephone 4925

Mississippi (except Louisiana and Arkansas) as
well as all of the Middle West. This year Roosevelt
did the same thing.
The unmistakable conclusion is that our elec-
torate is tending toward decisive shifts in political
temper. The entire nation is beginning to think
in the same terms. The old political entities, "the
Solid South" and "rock-ribbed New England," are
still distinct from the rest of the country, but are
by no means separate sections. This is plainly
indicated by Hoover's southern strength in 1928
and the Democratic victory in two New England
states four years ago as well as this year.
It is no mere coincidence that this development
has come at the same time as the utilization of
the radio for political purposes. When a politician
speaks for an hour on a nation-wide hookup, he
cannot afford to make appeals to sectionalism.
He addresses himself to the entire nation and he
is desperately anxious to please every part of it.
When millions hear such a speech, lacking in sec-
tional appeal, they will all form the same reaction
to it. Hence Iowa and Florida received much the
same impression from Hoover's Madison Square
speech; California and Maryland each supported
Roosevelt.
Chain banks, chain stores and similar national
enterprises of a national character have come
to dominate our business life. Now the chain
newspaper and the national hookup are beginning
to control our thinking. This tendency toward an
American mass mind is full of meaning for every
aspect of national life. Nothing will be more
vitally affected than politics. The radio's political
possibilities were plainly indicated in 1928; this
year we have seen them fully exploited. The results
lead us to think that radio's appearance on the
scene is the last decade's most significant develop-
m'ent in political publicity.

MANAGING EDTTOR.............PRANK E. fFERETH
CITY EDITOR.........................KARL SEIFFERT'
SPORTS EDITOR.................JOHN W. THOMAS
WOMEN'S EDITOR.................MARGARET O'BRIEN
ASSISTANT WOMEN'S EDITOR.......MIRTAM CARVER
NIGHT EDITORS: Thomas Connellan, Norman F. Krafn,
John W. Pritchard, C. Hart Schaaf, Brackley Shaw,
Gllenn R. Winters.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Fred A. Huber, Albert Newman,
REPORTERS: Hyman J. Aronstam, A. Ellis Ball, Charles
Q". Barndt. James Bauchat,Donal lR. Pird Donald F.
Blanbkertz, Charley: B. Brownson, Albert L. Burrows,
Arthur W. Carstens, Ralph G. Coulter.
William G. Ferris, Eric Hall, John C. Healey, Robert B.
Hewett, George M. Holmes, Walter E. Morrison, George
Van Vleck, Guy M. Whipple, Jr., W. Stoddard White,
Eleanor B. Bluim, Louise Crandall, Carol J. Hannan
Prances Manchester. Marlee:i. 1Murphy, Margaret C.
Phalan, Katherine Rucker, Marjorie Weston, Harriet
Speiss.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
)BUSINESS MANAGER................BYRON C. VEDDER
CREDIT MANAGER.................HARRY BEGLEY
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER ........DONNA BECKER
OPARTMENT MANAGERS: Advertising, Grafton Sharp;
Advertising Contracts, Orvil Aronson; Advertising ferv-
ice, Noel Turner; Accounts, Bernard E. Schnacke; Cir-
culation, Gilbert B. 13ursley; Publications, Robert E.
Finn.
ASSISTANTS: Theodore Barash, Jack Bellamy, Gordon
Boylan, Charies Ebert, Jack Efroymson, Fred Hertrick,
.Joseph Hu. mp, Allenl Knuusi, Russell Read, Lester Skin-
ner, Joseph Sudow and Robert Ward.
Elizabeth Aigler, Jane Bassett. Buelah Chapman, Doris
Gimmy, Billie Griffiths VirginiaHartz, Catherine Mc-
Henry, Helen Olson. Helen Schiuce, May Seefried,.
Kathryn Stork.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 23, 1932
Should Michigan Accept
A Rose Bowl Invitalion?

SIOULD Michigan,
she receives an
part in the annual Rose Bowl
played on New Year's day?

in the event Lhat
invitation, take
football classic,

Under ordinary circumstances, we believe the
Michigan athletic authorities, as well as the fac-
ulty, would oppose the proposal. The Western
Conference has in the past taken a strong stand
against post-season games, although the restric-
tion was released last fall in view of a strong pop-
ular sentiment in favor of charity contests. The
faculty conference, which imposed the regulation,
represents, in general, the opinion of Michigan
faculty men as well as those of other Big Ten
schools.
However, the situation this year seems to be
sufficiently unusual to merit special consideration.
The 1932 Michigan football team is undoubtedly
one of the strongest east of the Pacific Coast.
section. It has gone undefeated through a sched-
ule that will bear comparison with that of any
team in the nation. Its record is not only a credit
to the players but also a new climax in the career
of Harry Kipke, who is completing his fourth year
as coach of the Wolverines.
Three other eastern teams claim recognition for
going through the season without a defeat: Brown,
Colgate, and Auburn. Of these, Brown, Colgate,
or both will be eliminated when the two teams
meet on Thanksgiving Day.
While de do not deprecate the right of other
schools to the honor of playing in the famous
New Year's day classic, we believe there are points
in favor of opening the way for Michigan to accept
an invitation if it is extended.
Post-season games would ordinarily require that
the members of the football team take a con-
siderable amount of time from their studies in
preparation. A game on the West Coast, in addi-
tion, requires a long trip, and would under the
usual circumstances take the players away from
classes for a week. The New Year's day contest,
however, eliminates those objections, since the
game is played in the middle of the vacation
period.
Football players get little in return for their
work. There is some fame, but it is generally
temporary. And playing football is, after all, a
great deal of work. The Rose Bowl game would
givethe Wolverine squac a well deserved reward
for this year's great performance: a trip tLo the
Pacific Coast--a vacation tour opportunity that
many members of the team might never have
again.
As for precedent . . . a Wolverine team played
in the first Tournament of the Roses 31 years ago.
It was one of Fielding H. Yost's early champion-
ship elevens. Thousands of western alumni from
Michigan and other Big Ten schools would wel-
come the occasion.
- 1

-Mnnesota Daily
Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
daily. Anonymous eommne1ncatxons will be disregard-
ed. The names of communicants will, however, be re-
garded as confidential upon request. Contributors are
asked to be brief, confining themselves to less than
300 words if possible.
DR. ONDERDONK'S FAMILY
TREE AND FILIBUSTER
To The Editor:
After Dr. Onderdonk's scholarly filibuster I can
say with Agrippa: In modico suades me metricum
fieri. A genuinely convincing argument is afford-
ed by the family tree. The assurance that the
highly progressive State of Tennessee as well as
the Republic of Bolivia are in favor of the metric
system also has its weight as an argument. But"
most convincing of all is the crisp sentence: "As
a result of that conclusion, all by legal enactment
confirmed the adoption of the republics of
Central America and Soah America metric units."
As to the opinion of Hen drik van ford I must
raise an objection. This evidence is irrevelant,
immaterial and incompetent, he forgot to register
and consequently has no voice in our political af-
fairs. Moreover he has the flippant inconse-
quentiality of those who vote dry and drink wet,
Zor the specification book of my Elizabeth uses
feet and inches.
I note with some astonishment that no refer-l
ence has been made to the American Society of1
Mechanical Engineers, who gave the matter some
aareful attention at the height of the metric agi-
tation some ten years ago.1
That the late Glenn H. Curtiss is still "urging
gradual metric standardization" is somfewhat un-
usual and certainly proves his lasting interest in
the matter.
At all events I still am far enough from com-{
plete conversion to make an objection or two, as
your headline artist might put it, "The Eliza-..
bethan Kid is a glutton for punishment."9
First as to the matter of the anachronism. If
Dr. Onderdonk knew (as he seems to imply) that
the American dollar originated in Joachinstal ca
1518, while the metric system was first established!
by the French Republic in 179, it seems to me
that he was guilty of an anachronism in calling
the coin-metric.
Secondly as to the equivalence of metric and
lecimal I am not quite convinced by the reference?
to Webster, since Dr. Onderdonk (inadvertently,
f course) omitted a few words. He quoted very
accurately "pertaining to the decimal system of?
:neasurement" but failed to give the rest of the
sentence: "of which the meter is the basis." Per-
haps he had been reading the story of the thief,
who justified himself by quoting: "Let him who
stealeth go and steal," although the original con-
tained the additional words "no more."
Thirdly, I must admit that I was guilty of sub-
scribing to the common fallacy that adopting the
metric system would involve putting it into use.
Now I know better, since Dr. Onderdonk assures]
us "it will not change the size of anything, but
will merely be a modification in the terms of de-
scription." I see that we should only change the I
name of our present units, and I must admit that
allium sativum by another name would smell as
sweet. We should still be using our dear old
Elizabethan measurements but should call them
by other names. The gauge of our railroads
would still be 4 feet 8 /2 inches but we should call
it simply and fluently one meter, four decimeters,
three centimeters and five and one-half milli-
meters.. The locomotives might still run on ninety
pound steel but we should refer to it officially as
forty kilograms, seven hectograms, two dekagrams
and four grams.. We should call up the bootlegger
as usual, but instead of saying: "Jerry, bring me
around a quart of Scotch tonight," we should con-
vey the idea by nine decileters, four centilleters, six
and nine-tenths milliliters of disrespect for the
Eighteenth. This arrangement, I can readily see,
would have the merit of simplicity in its favor
and its efficiency would save us "billions" of dol-
lars annually.
To show my hearty good-will toward the pro-
posed official adoption I should like to suggest
designations for the unnamed decimals between

advocate the name henricometer after the great
Henry, who sells his products for "metric" money
but makes no further use of the metric system.
I must, however, decline my support of the opin-
ion attributed to me: "In Prof. Willey's opinion
thousands of dollars are wasted each year in
Architects' offices by our adherence to the English
system." Perhaps Dr. Onderdonk had in mind my
distinguished namesake, Weary Willie, or just the
willies in general.
Yours for bigger and better metric dollars.
-(Prof.) Norman L. Willey
THE DAILY IS INSJRED
BY HORATIO A. ABBOTT
To The Editor:
"Ann Arbor East Side Votes Straight," an edi-
torial in The Daily of November 19, and apparent-
ly inspired by an outburst of a Mr. H. J. Abbott,
as reported on the front page of The Daily, issue
of November 11, is an outstanding example of
what seems to me to be a persistent tendency on
the part of successive generations of Daily edito-
rial writers to seize upon any idea, no matter how
flimsy or ridiculous, provided it appears to afford
an opportunity to imply something discreditable
about the University of Michigan.
Boiled down, and couched in somewhat less
abusive terms, the editorial in question seems to
state as follows:
The fact that the sixth and seventh wards
in the City of Ann Arbor went Republican
in the recent election, and "time after time"
have gone Republican in the past, demon-
strates that the members of the faculty of the
University of Michigan, contrary to what
might be expected, are an exceptionally blind
and unintelligent group of voters, as it is
apparent that in general they regularly vote
a straight Republican ticket regardless of the
merits of the various issues and candidates,
thus in effect depriving an equal number of
the more thoughtful voters of the county, who
are "really interested in the election of local
officials," of their franchise. The amusing
sidelight on this practice is that in so insisting
on voting Republican the members of the
faculty sometimes vote against their own per-
sonal interests, as in the case of the votes cast
for Andrew Moore, "notorious" advocate of
property tax limitation.
Aside from the matter of judgment and good
taste, this statement is entirely unwarranted for
the following reasons:
(1) The Daily has no evidence that faculty
members constitute a majority of the voters in the
sixth and seventh wards, the so-called "East
Side." '
(2) The Daily has no evidence that any sub-
stantial number of faculty voters, much less a
majority, voted a straight Republican ticket (I
have so far been unable to discover a single in-
stance, although I have raised the point with a
number of faculty members known to have Re-
publican leanings.)
(3) It is quite possible for all candidates of a
particular party to be defeated in a particular
ward even if there are few if any "straight" votes,
either Republican or Democratic, provided a ma-
jority of the voters favor a majority of the can-
didates of one party. In fact, the more the in-
dividual voter tends to discriminate according to
his or her personai nmpress ons the less likely is it
that the "splits" will be concentrated on particular
candidates. It must also be remembered that
voters with Democratic leanings have the oppor-
tunity to discriminate in favor of particular Re-
publican candidates (and it is noticeable that The
Daily seems to assume that we have no problem
of straight Democratic ballots to worry about)
and in this lies a further possible offsetting influ-
ence.
I am not trying to suggest that criticism by
The Daily of the University as a whole, or of
any of its elements, is improper. However, in
view in particular of the extent to which such
criticisms are n6ted and relished outside of Ann
Arbor it would seem to be obvious that critical
discussion in Daily editorials of the University
community should be solidly grounded as to facts,
should be temperate in tone, and should ivolve
matters of some consequence. Certainly there is
no justification for an ill-natured attack upon the
faculty as a whole which has nothing more sub-
stantial for a foundation than the careless re-
marks of a local politician-remarks which it is

safe to say no well-informed person in Ann Arbor
would take seriously.
--W. A. Paton
Music and Drama

W E OF F E R

QYSTERS, qt....

Brief Intensive Courses
for Special Students
in

Typing
Shorthand
Bookkeeping

Spelling
Letter Writing
Penmanship

Competc Courses
General Busness -- Stenographic
Private Secretarial
ANN ARBOR
SECRETARIAL SCHOOL
205 South State -Tel. 3 30

1

Eat, Drink, And Be Merry!
Delicious food at price which will help you enjoy it

4
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ill

Keep Well Groomed
at
THE
GROOM WELL
BARBERS
WINNERS OF MICII-MINN.
Herman De Marco. ... ...3-0
H. D. Verdesco............. 3-0
F. W. W ilks ........ . . .....3-0
C. J. DePutron .............3-0
Free Guessing Contest will be
continued "on Basketbarla ts.
Don't forget, wactch 1for. toe
opening of our new shop on
State near Packard.
Free Manicure
with Baiter Work
615 E. Liberty
Near Michigan Theatre
Oh Boy, what a shoe shine
you get here

1

Celery and Olives

Soup (Cream of Turkey with Rice)

ROAST VERMONT TURKEY
with Chestnut Dressing, Cranberry Sauce and Giblet Gravy
Mashed or Candied Sweet Potatoes
VegeLa bles, June Green Peas
lead Lettuce Salad with Thousand Island Dressing
Plum Pudding with Orange Sauce
Hot Mince Pie Fruit Salad
Coffee, Te, or Milk
ESRESTAURANT
1201 So, University

F

11

1I

CLASSES
NOW FORMING
STENOTYPY
SHORTHAND
TYPEWRITINMG
B3OOKKEEPING
CALCULATOR
DICTAPHONE
SECRE'TARIAL
TRfkAILNING
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Business College
State & William Sts.
Phone 7831
17tih Yr.

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riii bALY CLASSIFIED ADS PAN

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11

These Aere the
Things Every Student
Is Needing Now.
Wool and Silk Hose
29C
4 pair for $L00
Made by the largest manufac-
turer of Men's Hosiery in the
world. Discontinued patterns
that formerly sold up to $1.00.
CORDUROY REEFERS
$4.95
NAVY BLUE P. REEFERS
$4.95

39e Baby Beef l'st 8%c up

C P G AN ELz
TELEPHONE CO.
7 5
rrwHUNDREDS OF PARENTS
ARE AWAITING, THIS
HOUR TONIGHT
8:30 p.m. is the hour when son or daughter, away
at school, makes the regular weekly telephone call
home. It's the bright moment of the week for both
parents and students, for hearing, each other's voices
s next best to actually being together.
At 8:30 p.m., Night Station-to-Station rates become
effective ... the lowest rates for Long Distance tele-
phone calls.
Station-to-Station rates from Ann Arbor to repre-
sentative points are shown below.

PALMER CHRISTIAN-
TODAY'S ORGAN RECITAL
LargoH......Handel
Sonata, Op. 88 (Pastoral) . Rheinberger
Pastorale
Intermezzo
Fugue
Prelude in E Saint-Saens
Fantasie ................Weigl
Noel ................................Mulct
Traumerei .................... Strauss-Christian
Norwegian Rhapsody .........Sinding-Christian
The imperishable Handel's Largo, which began
its existence as an aria, "My Plane Tree," in the
opera "Xerxes," has become so popular as an in-
strumental transcription that its vocal origination
is all but forgotten. The "Pastoral" Sonata of
Rheiinberger can find little justification for this
title except in its rhythmic figuration which is
commonly associated with the word, but as actual
music this Sonata ranks with the best of his many
works. It is based upon a theme taken from one
of the Gregorian Tones, which is used to give
a continuity to the whole sonata.
The "Prelude" of Saint-Saens shows his char-
acteristic attractive melodic writing in contrast
to the impressionistic methods of Weigl, a con-
temporary German composer whose tendencies are
towards an introspective, highly subjective type

Zipper
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$4.95
REINDEER SUEDE JACKETS
in Grey and Brown
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Suede Cloth and Corduroy
COSSACK JACKE TS
$2.45
TRENCH COATS
$2.95 G
All solid and fancy colored
broadcloth shirts, collar at-I
tached, formerly $1.35 values,
while they last,
$1.00, 2 for $1.90
Mallory and Portis
Hats $2.95 and $3.50

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$ 35
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