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November 18, 1932 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-11-18

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

OFFICIAL BULLETIN I

a

cation in the Bulletin is cqnstructive notlee to all members of the
rsity. Copy received at the office of the Assistatt to the Presient until
11:30 a. m. Saturday.

Mayor McKee
Seeks Reforms
Iii New York

Conductor In Politics

LIII

FRIDAV, NOVEMBER 18, 1932

No. 4'7

140TICES
President and Mrs. Ruthven will be at home from four to six o'clock on
day, November 20, to members of the ftidlilties and other residents of
Arbor.

Charges Waste,
Extravagance
Governmental

I

Abuses,
In City
Work

Automobile Regulation: The Automobile Regulation will be lifted for
the Thanksgiving holiday beginning at 12:00 noon on Wednesday, Novem-
ber 23, and ending on Friday morning, November 25, at 8:00 a. m.
W. B. Rea, Asistant to Dean of Students
University Bureauk of Appointments and Occupational Information: All
enrollment blanks must be returned today to the office of the Bureau, 201
Mason Hall. All students not returning the blanks by five o'clock will have
to pay the late registration fee in accordance with a Regent's ruling. Office
hours: 8:00 to 12:00 and 1:30 to 5:00.
Students, School of EdUcation: Permission to di'op courses without
"E" grades will not be given after Wednesday, November 23, except under
extraordinary circumstances. No course is considered officially dropped
uiless it has been reported in the office of the Recorder of the School of
Education, Room 1437 U. Elementary School.
Students, College of Engineering: The final day for the removal of in-
completes will be Saturday, November 19. This is in accordance with the
ruling that if credit is to be given for a course the work in that course must
be completed by the end of the eighth week of the semester of residence
next succeeding that in which the course was elected.
Liberal Students Union-Discussion and social hour will not begin until
after the address given by Sherwood Eddy at Hill Auditorium.
ACADEMIC NOTICES
Preliminary examination for the Ph.D. in English are to be given on
Nov. 19 in Linguistics.
LECTURE
University Lecture Friday, November 18, 4:15 p. in., Natural Science
Auditorium. Sir Frederick Whyte, former President of the Indian Legisla-
tive Assembly: "The Crisis in the Far East."
EVENTS TODAY
American Institute of Chemical Engineers: There will be a joint ses-
sion of the Detroit and Ann Arbor members of the American Institute of
Chemical Engineers with the Student Branch of the Institute today. Din-
ner will be served at the Union at 6:00 and there will be an address at 7:30
in room 3201 East Engineering Bldg. by Mr. Homer Cloukey of the Sharples
Specialty Company, who will talk on "Centrifugal Force and Its Applica-
tion to Industry."
Comhedy Club: Important meeting for all members at 4:00 in rehear-
sal room of the Michigan League.
Sophomore Cabaret: Waitresses Rehearsal at 5:00 at League.
COMING EVENTS
Le Cerele Francais: Meeting Tuesday, November 22, at 8:00 p. m. in
the Grand Rapids Room, Michigan League. Professor Talamon will speak.
Iefreshments will be served. Old and new members are urged to be pres-

NEW YORK, Nov. 17.-UP)-Acting
Mayor Joseph V. McKee, breaking
openly with Tammany Hall, has
sounded a summons to a crusade
against what he calls waste, extrava-
gance and abuses in the city govern-
ment.
Bursting like a shell filled with
political T.N.T., the Bronx Demo-
crat's denunciation of the forces in
control of the city government was
discussed excitedly throughout the
city today.
Rising late Wednesday night be-
fore bankers, merchants and busi-
ness men at a dinner, McKee, who
has advocated a policy of sharp re-
trenchment, declared in a voice
trembling with emotion that citizens
are "sick and tired" of present con-
ditions "and they are not going to
allow those things to continue." He}
did not, however, mention Tammany
by name.
Foreshadows Struggle
His speech, wholly unexpected, wasf
seen by political observers as fore-
shadowing a possible titanic struggle
at next year's mayoral election to
wrest the city government from
Tammany and allies, with McKeel
perhaps leading the assault.
McKee, who was professor of Latin
and Greek before he entered politics,
moved from the presidency of the
board of aldermen to the mayoralty
when James J. Walker resigned. A
non-Tammany Democrat, he is a
member of the Bronx organization
headed by Edward J. Flynn, long an
active supporter of Gov. Franklin D.
Roosevelt.
Out-voted on Questions
Almost from the outset, McKee
found himself outvoted in the board
of estimate on many questions by a
bloc consisting largely of Tammany
men. When time came to select a
successor to Walker, Surrogate John
P. O'Brien, a Tammany man, was
chosen and elected. About 135,000
people, however, wrote in McKee's
name on the ballot, although they
spelled it 78 different ways.
"This year something happened
in New York City," said McKee at
Wednesday night's dinner, which
was held by the Chamber of Com-
merce of the state of New York. "It
was just a matter of chance that I
should be the person that personified
it. There was something fundament-
al that happened in the political his-
tory of the city."
Nov. 19. Otherwise a treasure hunt
will bd held. Meet at Palmer Field
House at 2:30 p. m.

Ordinances On
Liquor WI e
Enforced-Laird.
City Attorney Clears Up
Confusion; Says Conduct
Of Students Is Better
(Continued from Page 1)
the election on Nov. 8, as to
whether or not the ordinances
of the City of Ann Arbor cover-
ing misdemeanors caused by the
use of intoxicating liquor will be
enforcable after the constitu-
tional amendment goes into ef-
fect.
For the information of the
members of your office, it is the
opinion of this office that the
ordinance covering misdemean-
ors involving the use of intoxi-
cating liquor, such as drunk and
disorderly cases, driving while
under the influence of liquor,
and similar offenses, are not af-
fected in any manner whatsoever
by the constitutional amend-
ment. Consequently, it will be the
duty of law enforcing agencies of
the City of Ann Arbor to con-
tinue to enforce those ordinances
after the constitutional amend-
ment goes into effect.
(Signed)

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place advertisement with Cilassiler
Adlerclsing Deparin-cii't Phone-
The classified column close at three
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box numbeli miy be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advance-11 per reading line
(on basis of five average wvordls to
line) for one or two insertionst.
Minimum 3 lines per insertion.
10c per reading line for three or more
insertions.
Telephone rate-5sc per reading lne
for one or two insertions.
14c per reading line for three or
more insertions.
101 discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.-
Minimum three lines per insertion.
By contract per line-2 lines daily, one
month.....................S$c
4 Ines E. 0.7, 2 months.........c8
2 lines daily, college year..........,c
4 lines F.O0.D., college year ......... rI
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The above rates are per reacting flte,
based on eight reading lines per inch.
Ionic type, upper and lower case. Ad
Ge per line to above rates for all capi-
tal letters. Add fie pe nine to ab~ove
for bold face, upper and lower case.
Add 14c per line to above rates for bolcd
face capital letters,
The above rates are for 7; point
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-New bob-sled; seats 6.
Bench circular saw, 15x17 inch
table. Bench hack saw. Phone 8165.
154

CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY

WANTE D-Student laundry by ex-
p:erinced laundress, work done by
hand. Shiris 12. Socks mended
free, Called for and delivered. 11
"re ""oo DI've Phone 548.
142
LAUNDRY --- Soft wter. 2-1044.
Towels free. Socks darned. 13c
WANTED - Student and family
washing,. Phone 3006. tc
k NOTICE
CHAT WITH FRIENDS
t4 Chairs Per Table
Meals (20 per week)$........$4.00
Meals Singly:
Breakfast 15c-20c, 7:30-8:45 a. m.
Lunch......30c, 12:00-1:00 p. m.
Dinner .....40c, 5:30-7:00 p. m.
Sundy Dinner 45c, 12:30-2 p. mn.
909 East Huron
Block North of Michigan League
Grounds)-
MICHIGAN DINING ROOM
151

(Associated Press Photo)
Thomas J. O'Maley of Milwaukee,
65-year-old passenger train conduc-
tor, became the new lieutenant-gov-
ernor of Wisconsin in the Democratic
landslide.
Brucker Is Asked
For Late Session
To Consider repeal
DETROIT, Nov. 17.- ()-Gov.
Wilber M. Brucker today had before
him a request by Common Pleas
Judge Charles M. Rubiner that heI
call a special session to consider re-
pealing or amending the state prohi-
bition laws to remedy the "absurdj
situation" caused by repeal of the
"bone dry" amendment to the con-
stitution.
Judge Rubiner said in his letter
that the cost of a special legislative
session would be less than the ex-I
pense of prosecuting prohibition vio-
lators and that no convictions would
result in spite of prosecution efforts.
As another development in the
tangled situation created by repeal
of constitutional prohibition in Mich-
igan, six persons, three of them wom-
en, were excused from jury service
in federal court because they said
they could not "render a fair and im-
partial verdict" in a prohibition case.
Two of the women were prominent
Detroiters, Mrs. Paul W. Tara, until
last week a member of the public
welfare commission, and Mrs. Helen
M. Stanidart of Grosse Pointe.
Later, after a conference with
Judge Moinet, the excused jurors said
they would be able hereafter to try
prohibition cases fairly in spite of
their opinions.

William M. Laird.-
Reluctant to comment on present
day student drinking because of his
separation from this life for so many
years, Mr. Laird declared that
"drinking 'in the open' is certainly
at a lower level since prohibition."
He was careful to add, however, that
"drinking in private may be just as
rampant as ever before." Cases of
campus fraternities to which this
might be applicable were cited, with
special reference to the fraternity
liquor raids of last year.
Lenient Verdicts Given
Asked if stringent laws might stop
drunken driving in the face of mod-
ification or repeal, Mr. Laird answer-
ed that his experience with juries
would tend to show that violators are
hard to convict when the jury is not
in symapthy with the law. "And
juries wouldn't be in sympathy with
an iron-clad law relative to drunk
driving," he said. "Granted that a
'steady hand and a clear eye are re-
quisites for driving in this machine
age, I don't believe this can be ar-
rived at through legislation."
I Varity Debaters Meet
Albion In Preliminary
Varsiliy affirmative debaters pre-
sented their first preliminary discus-
sion yesterday with Albion College
before an audience of 300 at the
Grass Lake High school. The sub-
ject debated was that of the West-
ern Conference Debating League on
property tax relief.
Michigan debaters for this appear-
ance were: Michael Evanoff, '34,
Phillip S. Jones, '33, and Samuel L.
Travis, '34. With the exception of
Travis the entire affirmative squad
from which the team to meet North-
western Dec. 8 will be selected is in-
experienced in conference debating.
Local audiences will first hear the
Michigan team Monday, Nov. 21, in
the Laboratory Theatre when the
negative group will debate the City
College of Detroit.

FOR RENT
ATTRACTIVE - Double room one
block from campus. If rented byI
on0 individual $2.50; as double
$2.00 each. Call 9673, Miss Dayton,
513 Williams. 105
LAUNDRIES
WASHING-And ironing. Called for
and delivered. Silks and woolens
guaranteed satisfactory. 2-3478.
611 Hoover. 15c

LOST-Black and white fountain
pen with name Elizabeth Robinson
printed on it. Phone 2-3248. 149
LOST-on Campus, pair glasses with
white gold rims last week. Phone
7117. 153
Arts And (raifIs Exhibit
Held Over Until Sunday
The National Scholastic Exhibi-
tion of Pictorial Arts and Craft
Work, brought to Ann Arbor under
the joint auspices of the School of
Education and the College of Archi-
tecture, is to be held over through
Sunday, Nov. 20, it was announced
yesterday.
It is to be seen in the large exhibi-
tion room of the Architectural build-
ing. The collection is open to the
public from 1 to 5 p. i. daily.

Gest Show Tonig-
LIONEL BARRYMORE in
"BROK EN L UL LABY"

..

aw

MAJESTIC

LAST TiMES
TODAY!

Phi Delta Kappa: Annual fall initiation will be held Saturday, Novem-
ber 19, at 4:15 at the Michigan Union. Initiation will be followed at 6:00
by a banquet at the Union. President Alexander G. Ruthven will be the
speaker. All members of Phi Delta Kappa are urged to be present.
International Relations Club: Because of lack of attendance the meet-
ing Tuesday was postponed until Tuesday, Nov. 22. A bibliography and a
tentative outline which will be followed in the meeting has been placed in
the Bureau of Governments.
Conference on International Relations: Sherwood Eddy, Editor of the
World Tomorrow, will lead all discussions. Sessions at 1:30 p. ni. and 7:30
p. m. Saturday, November 19, at Lane Hall, and 9:00 a. M. Sunday, Novem-
ber 20. Registration fee $1.00. Register at Lane Hall before 11:00 a. in. Sat-
urday.
Girls' Swimming ClUbl: Important meeting Saturday at ten a. m. in the
Union pool. As we are going to pass off groups, everyone is urged to come.
Those interested in trying out are asked to come. Please be prompt.-

itI

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Reformed students: Professor R.
B. Kuiper, president of Calvin Col-
lege, will conduct services Sunday
morning in the League Chapel at
9:30 a. In.
Mixer for Catholic Students and
Friends Saturday, November 19, from
3 to 5 p. in. at Sat. Mary's Student
Chapel, corner William and Thomp-
son Streets. There will be a radio
report of the Michigan-Minnesota
game. Dancing will furnish the en-
tertainment.

I'omorrow
"THE BIG BROAOCAsTt"

VINCENT LOPEZ

- CAB CALLOWAY

BING CROSBY - BURNS & ALLEN

1

I&

Craftsmen's Club: Meeting at the
Masonic Temple, Saturday evening,
Nov. 19.
All Members of W.A.A.: An open
business meeting will be held Mon-
day, at 4:00 p. in., at Palmer Field
House. All active members should be
present.
All University Women Invited:
Weather permitting, the Women's
Athletic Association will hold a to-
bogganing and skiing party Saturday,

4 A
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e1

N "E C IAtlRE? FE

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,,............................___ _____..______ ___,n..,

I

Michigan
now showing
Vthey call
it sin"

Thanksgiving Specialties
Turkey Gobblers - Roast Turkey - Individual Pumpkin
Corn in Husk - Horn of Plenty - Individual Pumpkin Pies

THE
SAME "70
HIGH
QUALITY
MEATS

REDUCTION
FOR
CASH
PURCHASES

The big thing in every Thanksgiving Day is the
dinner. Of course you plan on having the best
that is offered . . . assur yourself of the finest
by buying your Thanksgiving supplies at the
markets which advertise in this section of The
Daly, today and next Tuesday.

Try this Special:
FIG NUT ICE CREAM - ORANGE SHERBET
RED RASPBEIRRY ICE CREAM

I

ICE CREAM PUMPKIN PIES

*

loretta
young

george
brent

Phone 2-2553

436 Third Street

THE MICHIGAN DAILY.

III

"Ann Arbor's Best Tce Cream"

"torchy's busy day"
comedy
"movie album thrills"
novelly

IF

MILK and ICE CREAM
Snecial.

n

III

'

For your Thanksgiving
Meat you would like our

just dogs"
cartoon

REALLY A NECESSITY

11 & W BUT TER

Pasteurized Milk and Cream

Arbo springs Water certainly is wheh peace of mind is

11

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III

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