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November 11, 1932 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-11-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ICHIGAN DAILY
Established 1890

Ai. .__

CI

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I.~g 3..

Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
tion and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusiveiy entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to ituor
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein.rAllrights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.,
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second cla3s matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
mail, $4.50.;
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publishers Representatives,
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; _80
Boylston Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR.............FRANK B. GILBRETH
CITY EDITOR..........................KARL SEIFFERT
SPORTS EDITOR ..................JOHN:=W. THOMAS
WOMEN'S EDITOR..............MARGARET O'BRIUN
ASSISTANT WOMEN'S EDITOR......MIRIAM CARVER
NIGHT EDITORS: Thomas Connellan, Norman F. Kraft,
John W. Pritchard, C. Hart Schaaf, Brackley Shaw,
Glenn R. Winters.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Fred A. Huber, Albert Newman.
REPORTERS: Hyman J. Aronstam, A. Ellis Ball, Charles
G.Barndt James Bauchat, Donald R. Bird, DonaldF.
Blankertz, Charles B. Brownson, Albert L. Burrows,
Arthur W. Carstens, Ralph G. Coulter, Robert 'Engel,
William G. Ferris, Eric Hall, John C. Healey, Robert B.
Hewett, George M. Holmes, Walter E. Morrison, George
Van Vieck, Guy M. Whipple, Jr., W. Stoddard White.
Eleanor B. Blum, Louise Crandall, Carol J. Hannan
Frances Manchester, Marie J. Murphy,, Margaret C.
Phalan, Katherine Rucker, Marjorie Weston, Harriet
Speiss.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER...............BYRON C. VEDDER
CRIEDIT MANAGER.................HARRY BEGLEY
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER......DONNA BECKER
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Advertising, Grafton Sharp;
Advertising Contracts, Orvil Aronson; Advertising Serv-
ice Noel Turner; Accounts, Bernard E. Schnacke; Cir-
culaton, Gilbert E. Bursley; Publications, Robert E.
Finn.
ASSISTANTS: Theodore Barash, Jack Bellamy, Gordon
Boylan, Charles Ebert, Jack Efroymson, Fred Hertrick,
Joseph Hume, Allen Knuusi, Russell Read; Lester Skin-
ner, Joseph Sudow and Robert Ward.
Betty Aigler, Doris Gimmy, Billie Griffiths, Dorothy
Laylin, Helen Olson, Helen Schume, May Seefried,.
Kathryn Stork.
FRIDAY, NOV. 11, 1932
Weakening The Sons
Of The Wild Jackass...

Student Health
EXAMINATION OF THE EYES
An explanation of the designations or title:
of persons qualified to examine the eyes is con-
sidered important.
Oculist and ophthalmologist are the names
given to a graduate physician or a doctor of
medicine who has, in addition to the regulai
medical training, specialized in the treatment of
diseases of the eye and the correction of visual
defects.
Optician is the name given to the person whoj
is trained in the grinding and fitting of lenses.
Another name for an optician is optometrist. This
means one who makes measurements of the power
of vision and adaptation of lenses for the aid
thereof without the use of drugs. Another name
used is "eyesight specialist."
In an attempt to remove the confusion regard-
ing these terms, the Guild of Prescription Opti-
cians of America, an organization of the opticians
of the better type, has decided to call one of their
number a dispensing optician or guild optician
and to call the oculist or ophthalmologist an eye
physician. A guild optician or dispensing optician
will give glasses only when a prescription is
brought from an eye physician. They do not ex-
amine eyes; they only fill prescriptions. They
realize that glasses should be given only after a
careful examination of the eyes by a graduate
physician or doctor of medicine who has had
special training in treating diseases and defects
of the eye.
An optician, or optometrist, or eyesight spe-
cialist, is not a graduate physician or doctor of
medicine and he does not diagnose or treat dis-
eases of the eye. He is trained to grind and
measure lenses and to fit frames properly.
. The proper way to examine the eyes for glasses
is with the aid of a cycloplegic or "drops. There
are several kinds of "drops," depending upon the
type of case. All have the same effect, that is,
temporarily to put at rest the little muscles in-
side the eye, so that the pupil will become dia-
lated or enlarged. With a little instrument called
the ophthalmoscope, the physician can then look
inside the eye and see the interior, make a study
of its contents, and determine whether everything
is normal or whether there is evidences of dis-
ease. This can not properly be done unless "drops"
are used. Also, when the pupil is dilated the phy-
sician can, with another little device called the
retinoscope, see into the back of the eye and with
it measure the length or depth of the. eyeball.
When this is done he can accurately prescribe
a suitable glass; he knows what to prescribe, and
does not have to guess regarding it. The exami-
nation of eyes and the fitting of glasses without
the aid of "drops" are based on guesswork.
An eye physician can determine whether head-
ache and other symptoms are due to the eyes or
to other causes, and can direct the patient to
the proper physician. Pain around the eyes and
defective vision are often due to sinus' infection,
pus absorption from tonsils, teeth, etc. The eye
physician recognizes such conditions and the
proper treatment is advised. In such cases glasses
are not needed at all, although pain and eye
symptoms are present. It is important that such
conditions come to the attention of an eye physi-
cian so that glasses will not be prescribed when
they are not necessary.

o some threeyears ago when one Myrtle Ross
md a number of other people put this same show
o the acid test.
As I recollect those evenings down at the Whit-
ley, I feel that any play capable of standing up
inder the gentle ministrations of Miss Ross' com-
)any was a great play. And "Meet the Wife" did.
3ad as Miss Ross' production was, I wore the car-
et through in three places from rolling in the
aisles, and they carried me out on a park bench.
"Meet the Wife" has to do with that grandest
of traditional comic characters, the garralous fool.
Gertrude Lennox is partly Mrs. Malaprop with
some of Mary Boland thrown in. Too stupid to be
quite a hypocrite, she emotionalizes on her arty
soul, her false importance in the home, and her
imaginary past so intensely that she convinces
:ven herself. Last night Frances Johnson gave
a heartily amusing reading of the part, sweeping
through her lines with the requisite graceful, off-
hand, slightly absent-minded manner. Her char-
acter emoted, domineered, exhibited charm, rant-
ad, shrieked, fell into a dead faint; and it was all
great fun. Her performance carried the show,
along with that of Jack B. Nestle as Victor Staun-
ton, fancy fortune hunted. Mr. Nestle was laugh-
able without being annoying, in a part that could
go to either extreme.
Donald Brackett and Maxwell Pribil, although
handicapped by too-youthful makeup, were con-
siderably better than adequate.
Russel McCracken's direction was spirited (the
good-showmanship of the script overcoming a few
technical errors) and his drawing-room set was
appropriately burlesqued.
Another review of "Meet the Wife" will appear
in tomorrow's Daily).
ROBERT HENDERSON TO OPEN
BONSTELLE SEASON WITH PHILIP
BARRY'S "ANIAL KINGDOM'
The opening the Bonstelle Civic Theatre on
Friday evening, Nov. 11, with Philip Barry's com-
edy "The Animal Kingdom," will mark the be-
ginning of another chapter in the history of that
playhouse.I
This initial bill will be in the nature of a
memorial performance to Jessie Bonstelle, the
founder of the theatre which now bears her
name, it has been announced. Robert Henderson,
who was to have been associated in the season's
enterprise, has been engaged by the trustees to
carry on her work, and the sparkling Barry'
comedy has been selected to be the first of many
interesting bills.
A cast of distinguished Bonstelle alumni, in-
cluding Jessie Royce Landis, Lester Vail and Gale
Sondirgaard; has been selected for the produc-
tion. Others will include Frances Dade, popular
in Detroit and Ann Arbor for her many successes
in te anhual Ann Arbor spring dramatic festival,
Marie Adels, John Lucas, Ainsworth Arnold, Fran-
cis Copton and Walter Vaughn. Mr. Arnold,
who ha 'een a popular New York character actor
f'dr several years will play the prize-fighting
hutler-a part which he cieaed in Ann Arbor
last season',
"The Animal Kingdom," which Burns Mantle
selected as one of the 10 best plays of the year,
is the story of a man who married the wrong
woman. It is an intriguing study of contemporary
life in New York's Greenwich Village and the
wealthy Westchester county social set. The bril-
liant Barry dialogue, the amusing situations and
the conflict of human values unite to form an
interesting and lively drama.

TODAY
to the
MICHIGAN DAILY
Place your order with
Campus Salesmen or
at The DAILY Office
on Maynard Street...
Phone 2-1214
and have tomorrow's
issue delivered.

I

Foremost Popular
Place To Dinle!
(at Reasonable Prices)

FALL DANCE
U. of M. LEAGUE BALLROOM
sponsored by Blue Triangle League
Wednesday, Nov. 16, 1932
9:00 - 12:00 O'clock
Tickets 40e each

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T UESDAY'S results in the national
election made one thing practi-
cally certain as far as Congress is concerned. No
longer will the party irregulars, the insurgent Re-
publicans, as typified by Senator Norris and
Brookhart and Representative LaGuardia, wield as
powerful a vote as they used to. For now the
Democrats seem certain of a majority in both
houses of Congress and no longer will they be
forced to rely on the irregulars for support.
The imminent decline of the power 'of this group
brings to a probable close another era in party
history. For years these men had been elected
on a Republican ticket, apparently as bona fide
members of the party. But after election time
they deserted the parties to whom .they owed,
their election and went into the opposition camp.
Theoretically they belonged to one party, actually
they voted with the other. And their votes consti-
tuted the balance of power in a Congress which
was held by small majorities during the last two
years.
Extreme party regularity, blind to arguments or
conditions, is to be deplored." But to vote c'onsis-
tently with one party after having been elected by
the other organization does not seem to be quite
ethical. It is indeed fortunate that this election
brings with it the downfall of the power of the
so-called progressives. For in the next two years
they will have -to declare the true colors they
wish to sail under and stick to them instead of
sailing continually under false colors.
Roosevelt Smiles;
Stocks Go Utip..
T HE SMILE of a victor, the smile
of a popular favorite, the smile of
President-Elect Roosevelt, is a glorious thing. It
will probably have us well on the road to financial
recovery before President Hoover is out of office.
No aspersions are cast on the great ability of
Mr. Roosevelt. We are merely remarking on the
fortunate trend of mob psychology and the irony
of fate. Let us explain, Wednesday morning stocks
all over the country took a decided leap, which
was noticeable as soon as the stock exchange
opened in New York.
What is the answer? Candidate Roosevelt im-
presses upon the nation that he will bring back
prosperity if elected. He is elected by an over-
whelming majority. Convinced that stocks are
bound to soar, the nation rushes to buy at low
prices. A comparatively huge volume of buying
forces stocks upward, so more people buy. A new
confidence is engendered. Stocks begin to pay
steady dividends. People begin to buy merchan-
dise. More people have money. More confidence.
1ffnr,.,,htti rr- - -o-

212-214 So. Fourth Ave.

Dial 8094

Ann Arbor

GLEARKNIT HOSIERY

Screen Reflections
Four stars means a super-picture; three stars very
good; two stars goad; one star just another picture;
no stars keep away from it.
AT THE MICHIGAN
"THE CRASH"
Linda Gault...........Ruth Chatterton
Geoffrey Gault.........George Brent
Ronnie.............. Paul Cavanaugh
John Fair ..............H..Henry Kolker
The program in brief: We'll let you judge this
one more or less for yourself. Here it is: Linda
Gault, married to the plutocratic Geoffrey, Wall-
street bear, or bull, as the times may be, is "bored
with the world, Celeste" as she puts it to her
blonde maid. The time is 1929. October. Along
comes the crash, and Geoffrey takes more or less
to drink and attempts to worm market secrets
out of John Fair in order to about face, and come
out of the depression. Linda is delegated to do the
work. And so it goes. Finally she must go to
Bermuda. There she meets sheep-herder Ronnie,
big, tall, dark, Englishy sheep-herder who first
indicates his like, then his dislike, then his love
for her. He wants her to divorce Geoff. She
goes to New York to do this, doesn't. Then Ron-
nie appears on the scene and has "words" with
Geoff, although neither forgets that the other is
a gentleman. Geoff wants to take the Englishman
out on the sidewalkand pummel him soundly. In
a gentlemanly way. Then they forget all about
it and talk the whole matter over in a way we
though very sophisticated. There is talk then of
Ronnie's taking. Miss Chatterton to Europe, but
: . . does Geoff let him? No he sells her letters
to John Fair, buys back her idolized furniture
and they live happily ever after . . . with each
other. That is, Geoff and Linda do. Ronnie is
still Waiting in the taxi-cab watching the meter
go up, for all we know.
What do you think of it? We didn't, either.
Added attractions: An Andy Clyde comedy with
that girl with the form! There are some fine semi-
undress shots, although even a fur coat can't
conceal that girl. Also Paramount news, and a
Ruth Etting short, in which Ruth wears a dress
that doesn't fit. And Ruth's dresses must fit.
-G. M. W. Jr.
TheTa heatr

AND

LINGERIE SHOP

Editorial Comment'
THE HOOVER TRAGEDY
For the President personally in his defeat there
will be a feeling of kindness touched by the pathos
of the political misfortunes against which he has
struggled in vain. The strong god circumstance
was too powerful for him. He was held respon-
sible for the sins of others. Upon his individual
head was wreaked the spirit of resentment and of
vengenace fo1 events which neither he nor any
other man in public office could control. It is
true that he partly exposed himself to such at-
tack by identifying himself with the wrong poli-
cies and foolish promises of his party four years
ago; but to single him out as if he were the
sole man accountable, the only one to bear the
burden, the fitting target for the slings and ar-
rows of outrageous fortune, was no doubt inevit-
able, as human nature goes-especially as the
nature of the political animal goes-but distinctly
and grossly unfair. Mr. Hoover was deserted by
his friends as well as assaulted by his enemies.
The campaign was going against him almost by
default until he stepped forward to assume the
whole load of it. To the end he presented the
pathetic spectacle of a man exerting all of his
strength against formidable and insurmountable
obstacles. It was, a clear case of an individual
made to suffer unjustly for the mistakes and
crimes of others.
Herbert Hoover ought to be remembered for
his abilitiies, his successes as well as his failures.
Through all the great crisis he certainly displayed
great qualities, No President ever worked harder
in the hope of helping the people to escape from
their troubles. Mr. Hoover also worked with rare
intelligence. His grasp of facts was phenomenal.
His adherence to what he believed sound prin-
ciples was heroic. For fully three years he was
compelled to pass through the furnace of political
affliction, and came out of it, to be sure, with
certain defects and flaws revealed, yet with a large
amount of the pure gold of statesmanlike talent,
along wtih an undoubted and unsparing devotion
to the public good.

305 South State St.
(Half a Bloch from the Campus )
We have just received another shipment
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These may be had in Green, Red, Rose or Blue

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