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September 27, 1932 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-09-27

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDE

------------

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of the
University. Copy received at the office of the Assistant to the President until
3:30; 11:30 a. m. Saturday.

VOL XLIII

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1932

No. 11

NOTICES
Choral Union Concerts: The fifty-fourth Annual Choral Union Con-
cert Series will include the following musical attractions:
October 25-Boston Symphony Orchestra, Serge Koussevitzky, Con-+
ductor.
November 2-Lawrence Tibbett, Baritone.
November 36-Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Ossip Gabrilowitsch, Con-
ductor,.
December 12-Efrem Zimbalist, Distinguished Russian Violinist.
January 16-Nathan Milstein, Spectacular Russian Violinist.
January 27-Myra Hess, Eminent British Pianist.
February 8-Budapest String Quartet. Jose Roisman, first violin, Alex-
ander Schneider, second violin, Stephan Ipolyi, viola, Mischa Schneider,,
'cello.
February 15-Sigrid Onegin, Prima donna operatic contralto.
March 6-Vladimir Horowitz, Russian Pianist.
March 15-Ignace Jan Paderewski, in 8th Ann Arbor appearance dur-
ing the period of forty-one years.
Season tickets (ten concerts) may be ordered by mail or orders may
be left at the office of the School of Music, at $6.00, $8.00, $10.00 and $12.00
each.
Lecture Course: The University of Michigan Oratorical Association an-
nounces the following course of lectures for the 1932-1933 season in Hill
auditorium: Oct. 22-Lowell Thomas, illustrated lecture "From Singapore
to Mandalay"; Nov. 10-William Butler Yeats, "The Irish Renaissance";
Dec. 1-Frederic William Wile, "Behind the Scenes in Washington"; Jan.
11-Will Durant, "The American Crisis"; Feb. 21-Carveth Wells, illustrat-
ed lecture "Noah's Home Town"; March 9-Dr. Raymond L. Ditmars, illus-
trated lecture, "The Big Animals." Mail orders are now being accepted and
will be filled in the order received. The offices of the Oratorical Association
are located in 3211 Angell Hall.
Candidates for Rhodes Scholarships are requested to communicate per-
sonally with the Secretary of the History Department, in 1004 A.H., during
the coming week. A. L. Cross
Sports Activities for Graduate Students: Graduate students wishing
to take part in any sports offered to women students are asked to call 4121,
extension 721, and leave their name and address, and state the activity
which they wish to take.
Skin-tests--Freshman women: All Freshman women are to return to
have their skin tests re-checked at the proper time.
French 205 (Old Provencal), French 213 (Reading of Old French),
Italian 201 (Renaissance Literature), Italian 211 (Old Italian): Graduate
students wishing to elect these courses will meet Wednesday at 4:00 in
Room 10 R.L. to arrange hours. Any student unable to be present should
leave a copy of his schedule in the office of the Department before that;
time.
French 207 (Introduction to Old French) will meet MWF at 9:00 in+
Room 310 R.L
English 233: There will be a preliminary meeting of this course Tues-
day at 2 o'clock in Room 3212 A.H. Paul Mueschke
English 230: Spenser and his Age. Students intending to elect this
course will meet in A.H. 2213, Thursday, September 29th at 5 o'clock to
arrange class hours. M. P. Tilley
English 211 (g): This class will meet at 3 o'clock in Room 401 Library.
English 32: Sec. 6: This class will meet in 3209 A.R. Wednesday and
thereafter. W. Brown
English 127: Victorian Literature. This class will meet in Room 2023
Wednesday and thereafter instead of 3209. E. Griggs
English 297: All students in my section of English 297 may meet me in
my office Wednesday, Thursday or Friday afternoon from 2 o'clock to 5:30
o'clock. R. W. Cowden
English 35: Section 3 meets MWF at 9 in the studio in Morris Hall
instead of in Room 203 U.H. W. Abbot
English 1, Section 25: This class will meet in 2019 A.H., MWF at 2
o'clock. K. Hoag
The Bible as Literature (Oriental Languages No. 154) will be given this
semester (T. and Th. at 8 in 2023 A.H.) and not the second semester as
listed in the announcement.,

". . in Room 13-308 East.1Eginfr-
ing Building to dscuss a plan of
work and arrange hours.
Permission to change sections in
Spanish classes must be obtained
from Professor Kenyon, 201, R.L.
Varsity Band: Tryouts in all sec-
tions, including clarinet, trumpet,
cornet saxophone, horn, flute, pic-
colo, oboe, baritone, trombone, bas-
soon and percussion, will be held at
Morris Hall tonight from 7 to 8 p. m.
For appointments at hours other
than the above, call Nicholas D. Fal-
cone, director, any noon hour be-
tween 12:15 and 1 p. m.
ASSIGNMENT OF DESKS IN
GENERAL CHEMISTRY
Chemistry 3, 5, and 5E: Each stu-
dent must obtain two $5 Chemical
Laboratory Coupons at the office of
the University Treasurer, and then
report at the first possible laboratory
period assigned to his section after
the opening of the University. No
desk can be given out without the
coupons.
LECTURE
Geoffrey Hodson, of London, Eng-
land, will lecture in the Natural Sci-
ence Auditorium today at 4:15, on
the subject of "An Occult View of
Love, Marriage and Parenthood." In
the evening Mr. Hodson will deliver
another lecture at the Michigan
League at 7:30, the subject being
"What is Unique in Theosophy." The
public is cordially invited to attend
both lectures.
EVENTS TODAY
Gargoyle Editorial Staff: Meeting
of all editorial and art staff mem-
bers at 4 p. m. Anyone of second se-
mester freshman standing or higher
interested in trying out for the staff
is requested to be present.
Alpha Nu: Officers and members
meet tonight at 8:15 fourth floor An-
gell Hall f o r organization. Brief
meeting. Le prompt.
COMING EVENTS
Riding for Women: A meeting will
be held at the Women's Athletic
Building at 4:10 p. m. Thursday,
September 29, for all students who
are interested in horse-back riding.
University G o 1 f Championship:
Open to undergraduates scholastical-
ly eligible. Register at club office by
Thursday, Sept. 29. Qualifying round
of 36 holes. Medal play dates Sept.
29, 30, Oct. 1, 2. Eighteen holes each
of two days.
RUSSIA RENAMES CITY
MOSCOW, Sept. 26.-(P)-T h e
great city of Nizhni-Novgorod, chief
center of navigation on the Volga
River and famous in medieval Rus-
sian history, has been renamed
Maxim Gorki, for Soviet Russia's
foremost man of letters, who was
born there. The fortieth anniversary
of Gorki's literary activity was cele-
brated Sunday.
Following the protests, bridle paths
eliminated by a Kansas City civic
improvement plan were restored.
More . than 2,000,000 tulip bulbs
were planted in the city of Holland,
Mich., last year.
TYP EWRI TER
All IMakes lge and Portable
Sold Reted MC10aned aired
;axge choice stoc cEsy .
O. D.eMOR RILL,
314 S. bte St., Ann Arbor

Zeta Bet Tit Honored for
Ten- Year scholarship Record,

Kappa Delta Rho Leadsz
the Fraternities in Last
Year's Standings
Although Kappa Delta Rho won
first p 1 a c e in scholarship among
general fraternities for 1931-32, Zeta
Beta Tau, by gaining third place last
year, was awarded interfraternity
Conference Scholastic Trophy for
the highest scholastic record at the
University over a period of ten years.
Following are the standings of the
fraternities:
GENERAL FRATERNITIES
1. Kappa Delta Rho.................85.4
2. Sigma Phi........................82.5
3. Zeta Beta Tau....................82.2
4. Pi Lambda Phi....................82.0
5. Trigon . .......................80.9
6. Phi Alpha Kappa ..................80.5
7. Triangle ...........................80.0
8. Kappa Nu....... .............79.3
9. Alpha Kappa Lambda.............79.2
10. Theta Xi ...........................78.9
11. Acacia.. ........................78.8
12. Pi Kappa Phi ....... . ......... ...73.8

56. Sigma Phi Lpsion ..,...............72.1
57. Sigma Zeta ... ...................71.9
58. Theta Delta Chi..................71.6
59, Delta Chi .....71.5
GENERAL SORORITIES
1. Pi Beta Phi .......................83.2
2. Kappa Delta......................81.9
3. Sigma Kappa....................81.7
4. Alpha Gamma Delta..............80.9
5. Chi Omega.....................80.9
6. Alpha Xi Delta...................80.8
7. Delta Gamma.....................80.7
8. Delta Delta Delta....... ..........79.7
9. Alpha Phi.....................79.4
10. Alpha Epsilon Phi................78.4
11. Collegiate Sorosis.................78.4
12. Gamna Phi Beta..................'78.1
13. Kappa Kappa Gamma.............78.0
14. Kappa Alpha Theta...............77.7
15. Zeta Tau Alpha...................77.7
16. Delta Zeta. ...................77.5
17. Alpha Chi Omega.................77.1
18. Alpha Delta Pi1....................76.6
19. Theta Phi Alpha..................76.2
20. Alpha Omicron Pi1.................74.4
21. Phi Sigma Sigma. ..............73.3
MEDICAL
1. Nu Sigma Nu .. ......81.7
2. Alpha Epsilon Iota (Sorority)......80.8
.3 Phi Beta Pi .. ....................80.3
4. Phi Lambda Kappa.............80.0
5. Medical Fraternities ...............79.3
6. Phi Rho Sigma ....................79.2
7. Phi Delta Epsilon.................79.2
8. Alpha Kappa Kappa..............79.1
9. All Medical Students ..............78.8
10. Theta Kappa Psi......... . ......78.0
11. Independent Medical Students . .. .77.9

Bic-uni lGathering
Of Social Workers
At League Oct. 5-6
One of the most outstanding events
this fall in the field of social work
will be the biennial Michigan Con-
ference of Social Work, beginning
with a luncheon Thursday, Oct. 6,
and continuing until Friday night,
Oct. 7. It is expected that 500 rep-
resentatives from state social centers
will attend the conference, which is
to be held in the League.
Significant among the speakers is
Dr. William Healy, who will speak at
8:15 p. m. Friday in the general ses-
sion. His subject will be "Recon-
structing Behavior in Youth." Pro-
fessor Healy comes from the Judge
Baker Foundation in Boston, a
foundation which has prepared a
standard for case writing. He is the
author of "Reconstructing Behavior
in Youth" and "Mental Conflict and
Misconduct."
The Michigan Conference of Social
Work offers five institutes or short
intensive study courses immediately
preceeding the meetings. The insti-
tutes are planned to meet the needs
of those who wish to broaden their
knowledge of social work methods.
Oklahoma Philosopher
Is Knife Sharpener.
OKLAHOMA CITY, Sept. 26. -
Railroad Jack, Michigan's philoso-
pher of the simple life, has a com-
petitor in Menno Hergert, Oklahoma
City's 49-year-old 'whetstone phil-
osopher."
Hergert has made a living for
three years by trading, sharpening,
and selling knives in Oklahona and
Texas. Men lacking funds often ask
him to buy their pocket knives so
that they can get something to eat.
Total motor vehicle registrations
in Canada in 1931 were 1,206,836
units, a decline of 2.8 per cent from
1930.

State Youths
Oroanize for
Dry Campaignyl
65,000 Are Represented
in Prohibition Meeting
at Detroit Sunday
Detroit, Sept. 26.- (AP) -T h e
Michigan Youth Council for Prohi-
bition today was organized for its
campaign to prevent repeal of the
eighteenth amendment and the state
prohibitory laws.
Five hundred young members from
the metropolitan area Sunday adapt-
ed resolutions based upon the
promise that "the best interests of
this and future generations can be
furthered by the continued and ag-
gressive enforcement of the
eighteenth a m e n dim e n t." The
preamble said that those in conven-
tion here represented 65,000 young
people.
The resolutions urged adoption of
a definite program of education re-
garding "the effects of alcohol, the
liquor traffic and the gains made
under the eighteenth amendment";
opposed repeal or modification of
state or national enforcement laws
and indorsed President Hoover and
Gov. Brucker for re-election.
Another section said, "we resent
the vicious campaign made by the
wet interestscfor the return of legal-
ized liquor and protest their ma-
licious and slanderous attacks upon
American youth.
The speakers included Mrs. Tru-
man H. Newberry, sponsor of the
Allied Youth of America of Detroit,
and Ben H. Spence, Canadian prohi-
bition lecturer. Spence, said that
"Canada is giving a practical demon-
stration of how not to handdle the
liquor traffic if the desire is its abo-
lition."

Ten-Year Average Scholastic Rating of Fraternities
The fraternities listed below have not been in competition
during the ten year period.

Fraternity Av. Position
Kappa Delta Rho.............................4.4.
Triangle....................... 5.6
Phi Alpha Kappa............................... 6.0
Beta Sigma Psi...............................10.0
Theta Xi. ...................................14.4
P1 Kappa Phi.................................33.4
Theta Kappa Nu ...............................42.9

No. of Years
9
7
3
5
7
9
9

No. Fraternity Av. Position
1. Zeta Beta Tau................ 8.7
2. Phi Sigma Kappa ............. 8.7
3. Alpha Kappa Lambda ..........9.8
4. Kappa Nu ..................... 12.8
5. Trigon ...................... 18.1
6. Tau Kappa Epsilon.............18.7
7. Delta Alpha Epsilon............19.2
8. Phi Gamma Delta..............19.8
9. Phi Epsilon Pi........ ........ 20.6
10. Phi Lambda Phi...............20.6
11. Phi Sigma .Delta ............... 21.3
12. Acacia........................ 21.5
13. Sigma Zeta....24.1
14, Phi Mu Alpha ........ ......... 24.2
15. Sigma Phi.....................25.2
16. Theta Chi.................... 26.2
17. Phi Beta Delta................26.3
18. Pi Kappa Alpha...............26.8
19. Phi Mu Delta .................. 26.9
20. Chi Psi.................... 27.0
21. Tau Epsilon Phi ............... 28.5
22. Sigma Alpha Mu . . ..... . .. . . ..29.3
23. Chi Phi.......................29.7
24. Phi Kappa Tau................ 30.3
25. Zeta Psi .......................31.8
26. Delta Phi ...................... 32.4

No. Fraternity Av. Position
27. Sigma Phi Epsilon ..............32.9
28. Beta Theta Pi............... 33.1
29. Delta Sigma Phi,..............33.2
30. Tau Delta Phi ............ ..... 33.9
31. Delta Chi................... 34.2
32. Alpha Phi Alpha..............34.7
33. Delta Upsilon.. ..........34.7
34, Sigma Alpha Epsilon...........34.8
35. Sigma P1..................... 34.9
36. Alpha Tau Omega.............35.2
37. Sigma Nu.................... 35.6
38. PhimKappa Sigma..............36.3
39. Lambda Chi Alpha............37.4
40. Theta Delta Chi ............... 37.8
41. Alpha Delta Phi...............38.0
42. Delta Tau Delta...............39.4
43. Phi Kappa ..................... 39.5
44. Hermitage.....................39;8
45. Sigma Chi.................. 40.0
46. Alpha Sigma Phi'........ 40.7
47. Phi Kappa Psi ................43.8
48. Phi Delta Theta ...............44.4
49. Psi Upsilon.................... 44.5
50. Alpha Chi Rho................ 45.4
51. Kappa Sigma................47.4
52. Delta Kappa Epsilon ...........47.7

13. Beta Sigma Psi...................78.7
14. Chi Psi. .....................78.3
15. Phi Epsilon Pi .................78.3
16. Delta Sigma Phi................. .78.3
17. TauKappa Epsilon..............78.2
18, Phi Sigma Kappa ..................78.0
19. Tau Delta Phi ....................77.9
20. Alpha Sigma Phi...................77.6
21. Sigma Nu. ......................76.5
22. Phi Sigma Delta ...................76.3
23. Phi Mu Delta....................76.3
24. Theta Kappa Nu ...................76.1
25. Alpha Delta Phi ...................76.0
26. Hermitage ......... .........75.9
27. Delta Phi ........................75.7
28. Delta Tau Delta ..................75.6
29. Delta Alpha Epsilon ...............75.5
30. Theta Chi.... ................75.4
31. Alpha Tau Omega'.................75.4
32. Sigma Pi ..........................75.3
33. Kappa Sigma.....................75.2
34. Sigma Alpha Mu.................75.1
35. Zeta Psi. ..... .............75.0
36. Pi Kappa Alpha...................74.9
37. Delta Upsilon.....................74.8
38. Alpha Chi Rho .....................74.3
39. Phi Beta Delta .....................74.2
40. Sigma Chi .........................74.2
41. Psi Upsilon. ...................74.0
42. -Tan Epsilon Phi..................73.9
43. Beta Theta Pi....................73.9
44. Chi Phi ................. ........73.9
45. Phi Kappa Tau ...................73.6
46. Phi Kappa ........... ..73.5
47. Delta Kappa Epsilon...............73.5
48. Phi Kappa Sigma.................73.5
49. Phi Gamma Delta-.................73.3
50. Sigma Alpha Epsilon ..............73.3
51. Lambda Chi Alpha ................73.2
52. Phi Mu Alpha....................73.1
53. Alpha Phi Alpha .........;.........73.0
54. Phi Delta Theta.................72.8
55. Phi Kappa Psi.................... 72.2

12. Phi Chi .......77.4
LAW'
1. Phi Delta Phi.....................75.0
2. Delta Theta Phi...................74.1
3. LawtFraternities..................73.4
4. Lawyers' Club.....................72.5
5. All Law Students.................72.2
6. Independent Law Students ........72.2
7. Phi Alpha Delta..... ........69.9
DENTAL
1. Alpha Omega... ................78.4
2. All Dental Students.............76.1
3. Independent Dental Students .....75.9
4. Dental Fraternities ................75.7
5. Delta Sigma Delta...............75.6
6. Psi Omega .......:.................75.3
7. Xi Psi Phi .74.4
OTHER PROFESSIONAL FRATERNITIES
1. Alpha Chi Sigma ..................78.7
2. Alpha Kappa Psi ...................78,3
3. Alpha Rho Chi...................77.0!
4. Delta Sigma Pi 76.5
WOMEN'S DORMITORIES AND
LEAGUE HOUSES
1. Martha Cook.....................81.9
2. Hall ..............................81.4
3. Helen Newberry....................80.9
4. Reeves .. ..........................80.0
5. Betsy Barbour............79.2
6. Augspurger.......................78.8
7. Benjamin.........................78.7
8. Stapleton....................... ..78.6
9. Mosher-Jordan...................78.1
10. Shauman.........................78.0
11. Adelia Cheever ..................77.4
12. Holcomb..........................76.3
13. Felker ..... .......................76.0
14, McEachran........................74.6
15. Alumnae ...........................74.4
16. W ood ..............................73.6
17. Gorman ...........................72.9
18. Jeffery............................71.2
19. Bannasch....................... ..68.3

n

MODERATE

PRICES

Phil. 113 will meet on MWF 1 in
206 S.W.
Aero Englneering 14: All students
enrolled in this course for work in
wind tunnel research and design will
meet Tuesday, September 27, at 5:00

TRY US FOR A GOOD MEAL

Breakfast 7 A.M. to 10 A.M.............'...... A la Carte
Lunch 11 A.M. to 2 P.M......... ...............30c
Dinner 5 P.M. to 7:30 P.M......................50c
ALL YOU CAN EAT

Ay O G RP 1
m E.Liberfy Phone 4434
AN OFFICIAL MICHIGANENSIAN
PHOTO GRAPH-ER

L,

THE PARROT

BRIGHT SPOT
802 Packard St.
Today 11:30 to 1:30
Baked Ham with Beans and
Boston Brown Bread
Shepard Pie
Cottage Cheese Salad with Cold Meats
Swiss Steak
Roast Pork Cole Slaw
Mashed Potatoes
Peach Whip -- Cake -- Ice Cream
Coffee -Milk

HOUSE O' PLENTY
(Student Operated)

807 South State

1333 Washtenaw

featuring, a

III

%i

--I

30c
5:30 to 7:30
Soup
Individual Chicken Pies
Breaded Veal Cutlets
Pot Roast of Beef with Vegetables
Roast Pork-Apple Sauce
Hamburg Steak - Tomato Sauce
Mashed or Au Gratin Potatoes
Head Lettuce Salad -- Carrots, Peas
Cream Cauliflower
Pie - Cake -- Ice Cream
Meon

at the hut and the den tonight
ried/ meadowbrook chicken
southern style
dried raw fried potatoes
fifty cents

35c Luncheon

and a

I

h c Dinner

11

Rolls
Coffee -
4

Bread
Tea - Milk
40c

I

fin gerne

operated restaurants

e
r-------

Alex
Says

' '
r , .,,.

. AAA

44

e7

9l

°
i .,".

Alex will
see you

III

11

11

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