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November 02, 1932 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-11-02

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MlI C

I4?AN DIA

1.

1890

am..I

has for nulated a scheme that will meet the ap-
proval of the Regents and permit limited opera-
tion of automobiles by students with some schol-
astic attainment.
TeStraw V'dote
Refue nOdCy

;:

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it

Pubifshed every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in'
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
tion and the Big Ten NewsService.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRE S1,
Thp Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use1
for repubicationd ofall news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
publised herein. All rights of republication of specil
dispatches are- reserved.
Ehitered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michign,; as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier-, $1.00; by mall,
$1.5.. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
mail, $4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publishers Representatives,
no., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylston Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chiago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR..............FRANX B. *IL BRETH
CIT EDIT.-.....................KARL SEIFFERT
SV~ORTS EDITOR ...................JOHiN W. THlOMAS
WOMEN'S EDITOR................MARGARET O'BRIM
ASSISTANT WOMEN'S EDITOR............Miriamh Carver'
NIGHT EDITORS: Thomas Connelan, Norman F. Iraft,
John W. Pritchard, C, Hart .Schaaf, Brackley Shaw,
( lern R. Winters:'
BPORTS ASSISTANTS: Fred A. Huber, Albert NeWmaX6
REPORTERS: Hyman J. Aronstam, A. Ellis.Ball,.Charlaa
0. Barndt, James Bauchat, Donald R. Bird, Donald Ir.
Blanketz, Charles B. Brownson. Arthur W. Carstens,
Robert Engel, .Eric Hall, ,John C. fealey, Robert B.
Hewett, George Van Vleck,. Guy M. Whipple, Jr., W.
Stoddard White.
Eleanor B. Bliumi, Loiise Crandall, C' roi .. Hannan,
Frances Manchester, Marie J. Murp, Margaret C.
Phalan, Katherine Rucker, Marjorie Western and Har-
riet Speiss.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER.............BYRON Q. VEDD
CREDIT MANAGER........ ..........HARRY B~EGLEY
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER.......DONNA BECKER
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Advertising, Grafton Sharp;
Advertising Contracts., Orvl Aronson; Advertising Serv-
ee NoelTurner; Accounts, Bernard E. Schnacke; Cir-
culation, Gilbert E. Bursley; Publications, Robert E.
Finn.
ASSISTANTS: Theodore Barash, Jack Bellamy, Gordon
Boylan, Charles Ebert, Jack Efroymson, Fred Hertrick,
Joseph Hume, Allen Knuusi, Russell Read, Lester Skin-
ner, Joseph Sudow and Robert Ward.
:Betty Aigler, Doris. Gimmy, Billie .iriffiths, Dorothy
Laylin, len Olson, Helen Schume, May Seefried,
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 2, 1932
A New Type
Of Auto Ban. ..
W HEN the automobile regulation was
enacted five years ago it was said
that in time, perhaps, the stringency of the ruling
might be relaxed. Since that time the whole stu-
dent population of the campus has c h a n g e d.
There are only a few graduate and professional
students here now who were freshmen the year
before the ban was applied.

A FAVORITE speech of student radi-
cals includes an attack against the
average undergraduate for his apparent lack of
interest in national politics.
While in the past, perhaps, this charge has been
well founded, it most certainly is not correct this
year.tThe encouraging number of students who
are taking part in the Daily-Union presidential
poll, which was held on the campus yesterday, and
will be continued today, bears out this assertion.
We wish to commend the student body and the
faculty for their serious interest in the all-campus
straw vote. Evidently they realize that a poll of
this nature is valuable, when conducted in an
honest manner, in forecasting the general politi-
cal trend of the section.
We urge all who have not already voted to go
to the polls today and help make the returns
truly representative.
MusiC and D~ramna
LAWRENCE TIBBETT'S PROGRAM
Lawr'ence Tibbett, in the second of the Choral
Union concerts, will present the following program
at Hill Auditorium Wednesday night. It is rather
unusual that such a "popular" artist, in every
sense of the word, should be willing to forego
the customary hackneyed and time worn arias in
favor of numbers equally delightful but less well
known to the general public, and yet, one could
hardly expect the creator of the title roles of
"Peter Ibbetson," "Simon Boccanegra," and the
"Emperor Jones" to be hampered with trite con-
ventionalities.
Care, Away Go Thou From Me (Old Scotch
Song) ..Arranged by Margaret Pierrepont
Air from "Comus" ............Arne-Endicott
Vaghissima Sembianza (Fleeting
Vision) ...................... S. Donaudy
Jardin d'Amour (Garden of
Love).. .............Emile Vuillermoz
Le Miroir (The Mirror) .....Gustave Ferrari
laidens Are Like the Wind ...... Carl Loewe
If Love Hath Entered Thy Heart ......Marx
(Mr. Tibbett)
La teirasses des audiences du clair de
lune....................... Debussy
Rhapsody, Opus 2, No. 3..........Dohnanyi
(Mr. Wille)
:Deep River ................Harry Burleigh
Fiddler of Dooney ........ Thomas Dunhill
Edward................. .. Carl Loewe
Piano...............Elinor Remick. Warren
Dialogue between Tom Filuter and his Man
(By Ned the Dog Stealer) ......Lord Berners
De Hallelujah Rhythm.... ..Jacques Wolfe

-1
Campus Opinion
Letters publshed in this column should not he
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous comnU 1nca will be disregard-
ed. The names of communicants will, however, be re-
giarded as conifidential upon rejuest. Contribut~orsa fre
asked to be brier, connning utemselves to less than
300 words if possible.
HENRY FORD AND
RAILR~OAD JACK
To The Editor:
And to make it all the more interesting the
University permitted Railroad Jack to operate day
after day from his red monstrosity at the center of
campus. Now Railroad Jack is associated with
Henry Ford, a citizen of the state and an alumnus
of the University. Associated not only in believing
in more efficient modes of transportation but also
in believing that history is the bunk. Mr. Ford
said it on a memorable occasion *see files of the
Chicago Tribune) and Jack has proved it to the
satisfaction of countless throngs of students.
Yours for
Free Speech, '23
A PEP MEETING
THAT WAS A FARCE
to The Editor:
May I have the opportunity of openly expres-
sing my opinion of the fine way in which Mich-
igan's traditions are being upheld?

it

Tonight there was a pep meeting-a meeting
of the student body which was supposed to stir up
enthusiasm for the Princeton game turned out to
be a great farce. Hill Auditorium which is not
large enough to hold the crowd that should at-
tend such a meeting was scarcely more than half
full. And at that most of the people were towns-
people and faculty. Where was Michigan's tra-
dition honoring student body? Besides the band,
which is one of the finest college bands to be
found anywhere, there was the added attrac-
tion of having the coachingg staff. But who
turned out to enjoy this treat? Only a few stu-
dents, many townspeople, and about 10% of the
freshman class. Is that backing a team which is
headed for a Conference championship? If Mich-
igan teams had to rely on the spirit of the student
body to win games, they would never come thru.
However, our coaches are good enough to produce
a winner without the support of the students.
And the freshmen and sophomores were sup-
posed to clash to-night. But how did they do it?
About a hundred frosh turned out while the sopho-
mores failed to make their appearance at all.

i
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4

the

ly has always taken a firm stand against
Wion, but since the Regents believe that
i of ruling on the driving of automobiles
:y, The Daily suggests a plan for the al-
>A the ban which, it is hoped, will meet
approval of the administrative authori-
g that the time has come to lighten the
f the automobile regulation, The Daily
ly submits the following plan for the
ion of the Regents at their next meet-

:.s

PALMIERCHRISTIAN:
RECITAL FOR TODAY
Air 1Yajestueux..........Rameau
Sonatina from the Cantata "God's Time
Is Best"........................Bach
Gavotte . ... ... ...........Wesley
Prelude on the Dutch Chorale
"Laet ons met herten Reijne" ........Bull
Symphonic Chorale on "Ach, bleib mit
cleiner Gnade" . .............Karg-Elert
Scherzo ......... ...................Widor
Drifting Clouds ................d'Antalffy
The Swan ..................... Saint-Saens
Finale....... ...................Vierne
Between John Bull, a famous virtuoso on the
organ during the latter part of Queers Elizabeth's
reign, and Karg-Elert, who is one of the most in-
teresting of contenporary European composers for
this instrument, lies not only a matter of some
three hundred years and more in time, but a,
whole world of harmonic and rhythmic innova-
tions. The manuscript of the Bull Chorale was
probably the first exafnple in English music of
that period to be provided with indications for
registration, and yet, in contrast to the modern
Symphonic Chorale, this so considered revolution-
ary composition appears to be the height of a
naively sincere simplicity.

If Michigan's traditions can't be upheld why not
do away with them? If some higher power can't
put the freshmen in their place and encourage
the continuance of Michigan's traditions, why
don't we openly acknowledge the passing of them?
Why must this farce continue? Let us either en-
force or repeal.
May I suggest that the Student Council devise
some manner of preserving the freshman, sopho-
more rivalry, and at the next "pep" meeting they
might borrow some "stiffs" from the Medical
School to show some good old Michigan Spirit,
Surely they could do better than the "enthusiastic"
crowds at the Princeton rally.
Here's hoping the University of Michigan again
develops some "spirit" which does come out of a
bottle.
Joseph A. Buchmeier, '35
MR. T1OMAS
ON INDIA
To The Editor

i

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I,

AUDITORIUM

LAWRENCE TIBBETT

IN C LO1RAL UNION CONCERT SER'E S

The T RNCIZ OF SONG"

OlUT1ST.ANDING AS

OPERA S TA R
CONCERT ARTIST
RADIO SINGER
MOVIE STAR

E

Song Recital
TONIGHT
815 P. Mo

TIBBETT IN PERSON
77

TICKETS
On Sale at
school of music

THE NOVEMBER

GARGOYLE

In

SINGLE CONCERT
$1, $1.50, $2, $2.50
SEASON TICKETS
(9 Concerts)
$6, $8, $10, $12

HILL

All students of full junior and senior standing,
and all students in the Graduate school and the
professional schools of the University may have
unrestricted use of automobiles provided that
they have maintained an honor point average of
at least two for their college course as a whole
and for the immediately preceding semester.
All students granted such unrestricted use of
automobiles shall be issued special driving permits
bearing a copy of the identification card photo-
graph and a description of the licensee.
All students granted this privilege shall be is-
sued special permit tags indicating the nature of
the permit.
Administration expenses of this ruling shall be.
defrayed by a charge on all applicants, for the
driving privilege, of five dollars.
The advantages of such a plan as this to re-
place the present one are many.
First, this plan makes the privilege of using
automnobiles a reward for scholastic attainment.
The Daily in formulating this plan inquired of the
upperclassmen whose marks did not reach a "B"
average and of freshmen, whether such an in-
centive would encourage them to harder study.
The answer invariably was a very positive af-
firmative.
Second, if any student who had been granted
this privilege should fall below a point average of
two, his perni t would be taken away until he re-
gained his s anding, thus preventing a dropping
of standards as soon as an automobile was per-
mitted.
Thirdly, the enforcement of such a restric-
tion would present several problems which would
be adequately met by the provisions for special
driving licenses and tags. With these precautions
any time that an enforcement officer saw a car
with these unrestricted tags he could stop the car
and demand to see the special permit of the driver.
If the wrong person were driving the car he could
be punished at the discetion of the authorities and.
the car driving privilege taken away from the

In your issue of Sunday you report Mr. Lowell
Thomas as declaring that "India would lapse into
chaos if 'Britain should leave." I want to say that
this is denied by the leaders of all parties in
India. Four years ago all parties in British India
united in framing a constitution patterned to a
considerable degree after that of this country,
but with changes to adapt it to India's particular
needs.
If Britain had set up an Indian Government
based on their constitfition, or had permitted the
Indian people to do so, India claims that the
British might have withdrawn-with perfect safety.
India was not in chaos before the British came.
Britain herself. by her bloody wars to conquer the

N

WILL SOLVE YOUR POLITICAL PROBLEMS

S

The d'Antalffy Dirifting Clouds has the same i1U111GAL1M 1iNVK YW.
sutve expressiim Ctha ds sthe Nage, country, created worse chaos than the country
suggestive expressionism that the Debussy Nusgeshad ever known. India declares that Britain's
which was just recently played by the Boston :claim of being needed there to prevent chaos and
Symphony, has-the likeness lying not only in 'anarchy is a bugaboo, which Britain employs to
the obvious similarity of the titles but in the sus-
justify herself to the world in holding in bondage
tained harmonies and shifting, undefined thema- a great nation which has as much right to free-
tic structure. Unusual for Widor, who is generally ,omr as ais britain herself. India is a nation
seriouts and almos{ austere, is the delightful dma a rti esef ni santo
which, for 2500 years before the British advent,
"Scherzo", which bubbles with an irrepressible
had ruled itself, and had been more orderly and
joy, quite the opposite of the lyric, almost senti- peaceful tha Europe, and had filled a place
mentally melodic, "Swan" of Saint-Saens, that among the most illustrious nations of mankind.
has become so everlastingly popular with Amer-
ican music lovers, --Kathleen Murphy ; Mr. Thomas is reported as saying that before
n the British occupation of the country, there were
--__famines carrying away from 1,000,000 to 5,000,-

A
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D
A
Y

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Other College
CAMPUSES
THERE were no classes one morning last week at
the"University of Colorado. A group of stu-I
dents vho evidently didn't care to go to classes
the next day filled all the keyholes on the campus
with plaster of paris. Janitors and custodians were
kept busy for several hours picking out the plaster
and opening the doors.
PROFESSORS at the University of Rochester
have abolished 8 o'clock classes. They dis-
covered that it is better for students to sleep in
bed than in classes.
* *

000 of the inhabitants. The truth is, history re-
cords no famines in India as great as those since
the British occupation. According to British testi-
mony, there were, during the third quarter of the
last century, six famines, with a recorded loss of
life of 5,000,000 and during the fourth quarter,
eighteen famines, with a total mortality of from
15,000,000 to 26,000,000. Mr. Thomas should read
Indian history before giving his next lecture.
J. T. Sunderland

MICHIGAN IS
PEPPED UP
To The Editor:
We believe in signs. Recently, in my paper
at my breakfast, and all around the campus, I
saw warnings that Michigan was pepped up. We
saw these same warnings at Columbus. We "be-
wared" properly. I am afraid Princeton felt that

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BE INFORMED. When your political science instructor suggests that you
vote for a proven leader, when the economics lecturer recommends a vote
for the Forgotten Man, when the young lady requests your vote for Michi-
gan's sweetheart-be ready with the right answer. Don't be a hind or a zany.
Let GARGOYLE give you the low-down on all the candidates, both national
and campus. (And that in itself is a lot for fifteen cents.)
Besides that, however, you'll get a football skit which can't help but please
you, scads of cartoons, campus talk, Music and Drama, and a new book

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