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September 20, 1932 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-09-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

olan Fulfills Michigan

Tradition

With

Victories

uble Victory
tches Thosei
Hahn, Craig
Four Men Have Won
th Sprint Titles in

r

Tolan Winning His

Second Sprint

Title

Turner

Places

ener and Cristy Each
lace Third in Swim,
Ling Events
ur men have won the double
it title in the history of the
epics. One is the Canadian Per-
!illiams in 1928.
e other three are Americans,
specifically University of Mich-.
men. The list of Wolverine
men who won Western Confer-
national, or Olympic champion-
include Archie Hahn, Ralph
,, Carl Johnson, Les Wittman,
art Hubbard, Buck Hester, Vic
insky, and now Eddie Tolan, the
est of them all.
hn won both of the short races:
1e 1904 Olympics at St. Louis.
duplicated this feat in 1912.
neither had to defeat such an
egation of sprinters as Tolan left
s wake at Los Angeles. These
> are the American greats who
from Michigan.
Hoyt Trained Tolan
an started training under Coach
k Hoyt down in Yost Field House
June. Eddie concentrated on the
iry dash at Hoyt's suggestion,
icing starts alone for more than
)nth. Hoyt strengthen Eddie's
n g finished by building his
gth with jogs of a quarter mile
nger.
preme confidence was Tolan's
attribute that the other sprint-
id not have. He knew that he
;oing to win the 200-meter dash
hat he might also come through
.e 100.
Eddie got to the coast, he jump-
f the train and was in his track
es ready for a trial less than a
hour after the train had stopped.
vent to the starting line with
important track coach in the
ry looking on.
er the trial each coach was
i what he clocked Tolan at and
replied that he did not catch
However, 12 watches caught
at 9:2 and fou at 9:4.
er the semi-finls Steve Farrell,
(Continued on Page 13)

Adding Purple
Makes Kipke's
Duties Harder
irst Three Games Will Be
Hlarlest Michigan Ever
Attempted
(Continued from Page 9)
former favored. However, Ford is
such a valuable man that he may
force his way into the lineup as a
guard,
Be1des the ends, Michigan will be
the ::trongest in the backfield. Three
regulars, Fay, Everhardus, and New-
man, are back, as are Meldman,
Westover, Schmidt, Renner, Heston,
and DeBaker, all substitutes in 1931.
These men are being forced to top
speed by newcomers Oliver, Regeczi
and Palmaroli.
From these men, and possibly a
few others, Coach Kipke will en-
deavor to find a winning combina-
tin ThA kP~af zt : ++

Daniels, Great
Wolverine Star,
Thanks Friendship
Norman Daniels, Michigan's great
nine-letter man, has found out that
friendship and love are great things.
Norm signed with Hillsdale as a
coach last fall and when the baseball
team was asked to Japan, he found
that he could not go unless he got

a substitute for his coaching posi-
tion. Omer LaJeunesse, regular Wol-
verine guard last year, offered his
services and Danny was free to go
with the team.
Then Danny got married. And an-
other question of what to do arose.
Finally it was decided that the new
bride would accompany the team at
Danny's expense and enjoy the trip
too.
Reports from Japan seem to show
that the honeymooner is still playing
great baseball for the Wolverine
nine.

inin e.

(Associated Press Photo)
Running like two other Michigan stars, Archie Hahn and Ralph Craig who also won both Olympic
Sprint titles, Eddie Tolan easily outdistanced his rivals in his. World record race of 21.2. George Simpson
is next with Metcalfe third. Jonath of Germany, Luti of Argentina, and Walters of South Africa followed
the Michigan star across the finish line.

Michigan's Most Famous Play,
"Old 83," Is Doomed by Rules

The oldest and most successful play
in all football history is at last
stopped, not by an opposing team,
but by the new rules. "Old 83," the
greatest play of them all, goes into
the record books for the last time,
the closing chapter.
The new rule declares the ball
dead if any -part of the player's body
other than his hands and feet touch
the ground while the pigskin is in his
possession. . On "Old 83" the quar-
terback dropped to one knee.
For 30 years this play fooled Mich-
igan's opposition, the spectators, and
many times even the officials. The
late Walter Eckersall spoiled it on
three occasions by losing sight of the'
ball and colliding with the left half-
back. Another referee mussed up.
"Old 83" in the 1930 Michigan-Har-
vard game, when Jack Wheeler stum-
bled over him, with the ball on Har-
vard's 12-yard line. .
Another reason "Old 83" was such
a famous play is that it takes a
squad a long time to learn it, and
even then it does not look like a
winning play in practice sessions. So
other teams have not adopted it.
Michigan knew the play thoroughly
and probably, the opponents would
not venture to use it against the

Wolverines. Anyway, it has never
been widely adopted.
In the play itself, the Michigan
eleven lined up as for an end around
try with the left end taking the ball
from the quarterback, or a line
plunge by the fullback through right
tackle. As the ball was snapped, the
left end raced back and to the right,
passing the signal caller, who faked
a pass to him, at the same time tak-
ing one step to the right, pivoting
behind the right guard, and drop-
ping to his knee. The fullback went
through the line, adding to the im-
pression that the play was at the
right side.
The right halfback went to right
tackle and helped block opposing
linesmen. The right tackle and right
end cut through the line to take out
the opposing right halfback. Left
tackle, left guard, center, and right
guard merely stood their ground to
protect the quarterback. These ma-
neuvers sometimes drew the entire
defending team to the right. Mean-
while the Michigan left halfback
took three steps to the right to help
the impression of an attack on that
side and then raced to the left. The
(Continued on Page 13)

t in ine ea~sL pot is at -
Tad JonesIsThirteen men were designa
tackles for the pre-school pr
Along with them are six g
Selected for seven ends, and five centers.
All Coaches Are Back
C n e s oMichigan stood pat with
ongress o strategy squad of head coach;
line coach Cappon, backfield
NEW HAVEN, Conn., Sept. 19.--(JP)Weber, and end coach Ooste
-T. A. D. Jones, former Yale foot- Every one of tese former
ball coach, was unanimously nomi- under the Yost system. Moderr
nated at a Republican convention ball has caused minor chang
today for the seat in Congress held fundamentally the famous
by Rep. John Tilson, who recently is still in force.
announced his retirement. Tilson Michigan has never used ar
himself placed Jones' name before apparatus of any kind in hert
the delegates. ing policy, the only exception
The veteran Tilson, who lost the a tackling dummy. Cast-off
party. leadership in the last session mobile tires have never fo
of the House of Representatives to home in Ann Arbor for the tr
Bertrand Snell, of New. York, told of broken-field runners. Th
the delegates: "This might be called has never been asked to pus
the celebration of my passing out, strain against a stone-boat or
If it is a funeral, it is the most joy- moving float. Michigan uses
ous I ever attended." to-man training in an eff
He said he looked forward with teach its players the kind of
joy to being relieved of his duties. ball that one finds in a game.
:A.
.Y.
Y S1
- ""..

tackle.
ted as
ractice.
guards,
h her
Kipke,
coach
rbann.
ars re
ichigan
n foot-
es but
system
rtificial
coach-
being
auto-
und a
aining
e line
h and
hard-
man-
ort to
foot-

Van B ovenC
State Street, Ann Arbor 41 East Adams, Detroit

.

4,

As the Word

L-7l

T

11 7

Denotes

First String

in Athletics,

So It Means Supremacy in Laundry
Work. Michigan Students Appreci-
ating This Have Honored Us With
Their Laundry Work For Years.,.
We Know That You Too Will Be-
come a VARSITY MAN or WOMAN

4

In Your Laundry Selection.

Start

The Year Using Varsity

Service

You Will Certainly Do It Soon.

-and raw tobaccos

4

have no place in cigarettes

THE
,-aUNDRy CO-

Theyare notpresentin Luckies
. ..the mildest cigarette
you ever smoked
W buy the finest, the very
finest tobaccos in all the
world-but that does not
explain why folks every-
where regard Lucky Strike as
the mildest cigarette. The fact

these fine tobaccos, after
proper aging and mellowing,
are then given the benefit of
that Lucky Strike purifying
process, described by the
words- "It's toasted". That's
why folks in every city, town
and hamlet say that Luckies

300 South Fifth

are such mild cigarettes.

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