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February 14, 1933 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-02-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-95upow- -

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

,

CAMPUS

SOCIETY

j

louses Honor
Rushees With
Novel Dinners

I

Phi Iota Alpha'
Honors Campus
Latin-Americans

FREEMAN'S
DINING ROOM
One Block North from Hill Auditorium
NEW PRICES.- BY THE WEEK
TWO MEALS PER DAY . . . . . $4.00
THREE MEALS PER DAY . ., . $5.50

Lois Duggan, Frederick Schiller
Speak Vows At Mosher-Jordan

Alpha OmicronPi Pledges
Two; Pi LaImbda Phi
Moves To New House
Examinations and v.acation over
with, sororities turn their attention
to resumption of rushing activities.
Fraternity officers are elected.
ALPHA OMICRON PI
Alpha Omicron Pi wishes to an-
nounce the pledging of Harriet Olek-
siuch, '35, Cleveland, and Elizabeth
Evans, '36, Buffalo,
CHI OMEGA
At a rushing dinner to be held
tonight by Chi Omega Valentine dec-
orations will be used. A rushing din-
ner will also be held Wednesday
evening.
PI LAMBDA PHI
Pi Lambda Phi moved to its new
home at 732 Hill street, formerly the
Xi Psi Phi house; from their old
house at 715 Forest avenue, yesterday
afternoon. The enlarged quarters will
enable all active members to live
there this semester.
SIGMA KAPPA
Sigma Kappa will entertain with
two attractive rushing dinners this
week, on Wednesday and Thursday
nights. Dinner Wednesday will honor
six guests. Decorations will be car-
ried out in red and white, following
a Valentine's theme. Six guests will
also be entertained Thursday night.
Black tapers, white roses and black
and white silhouette place cards will
be used.
XI PSI PHI
Election of officers was made at a
recent meeting of the' members of
Xi Psi Phi fraternity. Faustin N.
Weber, '34D, was chosen as- presi-
dent; J. Walter Seeberger, '34D, as
vice-president; Edmond.-N.-Barbara
'34D, secretary; Howard Woodruff,
'34D, treasurer and house manager,'
and Norman Allistin, '34D, was se-
lected as a member of the board of
directors.

An invitation to join a. world-wide
organization has been tendered the
Latin-American Society by Phi Iota
Alpha, international fraternity for
Latin-American students, it was
learned yesterday.
At a banquet held shortly before
the end of last semester, representa-
tives from the fraternity headquar-
ters at Boston explained the nature
of the organization and expressed a
desire to take into its ranks the local
organization. The representatives are
students at Massachusetts Institute
of Technology Rensselaer Bolytechnic
Institute at Troy N. Y., and Tri-State
College at Angola, Ind.
Among the guests at the banquet
were Prof. Jose M. Albaadejo, of the
Spanish department, and Mrs. Albal-
dejo; Ermelindo A. Mercado of the
Spanish department, Dr. Buenaven-
aura Jimenez of the Health Service,
and Miss Jimenez.
Activities which the society is
planning for the rest of the year in-
Alude talks by distinguished men of
ratin interests. At the banquet; to be
'eld at the Spanish Room, Raynard
street restaurant, on some date to be.
rnnounced, Mr. Mercado will give a
lecture dealing with the recent revo-
lution in Spain, according to George
Jiminez, president of the society.
ETA SIGMA PHI
E. S. McCartney will speak to
members of Eta Sigma Phi, national
classical honorary society, on "The
Influence of Ancient Superstition on
Our English Vocabulary" at a meet-
ing at 7:45 p. m. today in Lounge 1
of1 the League. Louise Canberg, Grad.,
vill review Edith Hamilton's latest
book, "The Roman Way."
OTHER J-HOP GUESTS
Names of the following J-Hop'
guests were inadvertently omitted;
from the extras,
..ass eLey %inker, Columbus, 0.,
zttended with Cyrus Huling, chair-
nan of the music committee. Other
;uests of Phi Gamma Delta were Sue
homas, '36, Anna Jane Chamber-
ain, '35, Ann Harsha, Detroit, Ellen

An informal wedding of quiet charm
took place at 8 p. m. Feb. 9 in the
north drawing room of Mosher-Jor-
dan Halls, when marriage vows were
spoken by Lois Bailey Duggan, '33,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James W.
Duggan of Bradford, Pa., and Fred-
erick William Schiller, '33E, of Mau-
mee, 0., son of Mr. and Mrs. Carl F.
Schiller of Lehe, Germany. The cere-
mony was read by the Rev. Ray Alli-
son Heaps, pastor of the First Con-
gregational Church.
The event held more than ordinary
interest, in that the couple became'
acquainted as students here, and the
wedding was the first to be solemn-
ized at Mosher-Jordan.
Following the ceremony, an in-
formal reception was held. In addi-
tion to the bride's mother and the
directors and residents of the halls,
the guest list included Pres. Alex-
ander G. Ruthven and Mrs. Ruthven,
Dean Alice C. Lloyd, Mr. and Mrs.
Frederick P. Jordan, Miss Ethel Mc-
Cormick, Mrs. Florence W. Tousey,
Prof. Roger L. Morrison and Mrs.
Morrison, Prof. Robert C. Angell and
Mrs. Angell, and Prof. Malcolm H.
Soule and Mrs. Soule; Mrs. Griffith
Herold (Mary Downs, '36) of Brad-
ford, and Dr. Willa Yeretsky of!
Grand Rapids, who is a guest of Miss
Harman at the dormitory. The guests
were greeted on their arrival by Inez

V. Bozorth, Elizabeth H. Carter and
Isabel W. Dudley, d i r e c t o r s of
Mosher-Jordan Halls.
In the west living room, refresh-
ments were served by assistant direc-
tors of the dormitory, with class-
mates of the bride. Lois Failyer
poured; Katherine D. Koch and Dor-
othy J. Birdzell, assistant directors
of Mosher-Jordan Halls, served ices
at the long table, which was laid with
a cloth of ecru lace and centered by
the wedding cake flanked by brass
candelabra with rose tapers. Ar-
rangements were in charge of Kath-
leen E. Lockhart, '33, and Helen V.
Bailey, '33, both members of the so-
cial committee of the hall.
Mr. and Mrs. Schiller left for a
short wedding trip and will be at
home at 717 East Huron street, plan-
ning to remain in Ann Arbor until
both complete their University work.
Mrs. Schiller attended Smith Col-
lege at Northampton, Mass., for two
years before entering the University
here. Mr. Schiller has made his home
with an uncle, J. L. Schiller, at Mau-
mee, since coming to this country
when he was about 14 years old, from
his birthplace in Germany. He is a,
member of the Varsity gymnastic
team, holding the campus champion-
ship for the high bar and rings, and
the state rings championship. He
plans to become a highway engineer.

JVnre To Go
Motion Pictur.-s: Michigan. "Hot
Pepper"; Majestic, "Hello Every-
body": Wuerth, "Life Begins."
Athletic Events: Hockey, Michigan
vs. Michigan College of Mines, 8 p. m.
Dances: Tea dancing, 3 to 5 p. m.,
League grill.
George Stanley To Talk

SINGLE MEALS
Breakfast 30c Lunch 30c
Sunday Diner 50c

Dinner 40C

At Graduate Lncheo

u

Mr. George Stanley, of the geology
department, will give an illustrated
lecture describing the University ex-
pedition to Isle Royale at the Grad-
uate Luncheon Club meeting at 12:15
p. m. today in the Russian Tea Room
of the League. The meeting will
mark the resumption of the club's
activities for the new semester.

l
r
i
l

PROMPT SERVICE -- EXCELLENT FOOD
Serving Michigan Men and Women for the Twenty-ninth Year !
r I I7llltle

T HE

RU DOLPH'S
BEAUTY SHOP
(formerly Chic Beauty Shop)
Specializing in
PERMANENT WAVES
PERSONALITY HAIRCUTS
SCALP TREATMENTS
FINGER WAVES
FACIALS
-Spec ialI-

MICHIGAN LEAGUE
GRILL

MEAL TICKETS - $4.50 FOR 20 MEALS
including Our Regular Luncheon
and Dinner

11

I

singing the Negro
Colored ProgramnAfterward several
Featured At Church MisEth n
The non-musics
A colored quintette, soloist, and program consisted
lecturer were the features of a col- George W. Crocket
ored students' program presented colored student in
Sunday night in the Congregational He spoke on "Abro
Church Parlors. The program was the Negro."
presented at a regular social meeting According to Mr.
of the Congregational Student Fel- for the Negroes, "e
Slowship. meaning of inner-r
Following the regular Fellowship For them, he sid,
supper, everyone present joined in ,coin "is never old."

National Anthem.
solos were sung by
s, of Jackson, and
inn Arbor.
al portion of the
Sof a lecture by
t, Grad., who is a
the Law School.
aham Lincoln and
Crockett, Lincoln,
pitomizes the realj
racial friendship."!
the story of Lin-

SHAMPOO
FINGERW
54c

AND
AVE

_I

i

BUY THIS REGULAR WEEKLY TICKET AND SAVE

Lillian May of the Contoure
Laboratories, New York City,
will be at this shop for Con-
sultation Thursday, Feb. 16.
Phone 2-2757
207-208 Michigan Theatre Bldg.

11

MICHIGAN DAILY CLASSIFIEDS ADS PAY

ane Conover,

'35, Sally Place, '33.

.:.® __
:..M .xz, w - , f
----- --W------- . ,.. _.._._._.._____ _ _____ ___._.___,___d...,

Fair Co-ed and
Proud Admirer USED to
Breeze Down State Street
On a Bicycle
-and they USED to have to be satisfied
with crude cleaning methods.
but now no one need accept anything but
MICROCI A
GREENE.,'S
CLEANERS and DYERS
E U..NDER THE MIC-_OSCOPE
SDI

Josie, the lovely trapeze artist, stands upon a small platform.
At the will of the magician she leaps twenty feet into the air
to reach her trapeze. She uses no ropes, no ladder! A phe-
nomenal leap for a wmn,, ,or a man! 07 AJ ro 4

EXPLANATION:
Josie didn't jump.. . she was sprung! The twenty-foot leap
is not dependent on Josie's ability, but on a powerful spring
mechanism hidden beneath the stage which propels the artist
upward through the air. The force is so violent that the lady
wears a light steel jacket which protects her from injury as
she starts her astonishing leap.

... TS MORE RIT70Aew

Magic has its place... but not in ciga-
rette advertising.
Consider the illusion that there is
a mysterious way to give cigarettes a
superior "flavor."
EXPLANATION: Cigarette flavor can be
controlled by adding artificial flavor-
ings. By blending. And by the quality
of tobaccos used.,
Cheap, raw tobaccos can be "built
up" or "fortified" by the lavish use
of artificial flavorings:

Such magic, however, seldom holds
the audience. Your taste finally tells
you the truth.
The cigarette flavor that never stales,
never varies, never loses its fresh ap-
peal, comes from mild, ripe, fragrant,
more expensive tobaccos...blended to
bring out the full, round flavor of each
type of leaf. It's the quality of the to-
bacco that counts!
It is a fact, well known by
leaf tobacco experts, that
Camels are made from finer,
MORE EXPENSIVE tobaccos than
any other popular brand.
Because Camel actually pays millions
more every year for choice tobaccos,
you find in Camels an appealing mild-
ness, a better flavor.
And Camels taste cooler because
the welded Humidor Pack of three-
nlv. MOITUTrREPRTOOF relltonbane

> ,

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