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February 23, 1933 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-02-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Americans To f
Visit Russia,
StudyCountry
Group Will Avoid Biased
Viewpoints, Will Be Led
By Famous Men
Early in July a group of Americans
will visit the Soviet Union under the
guidance of specialists from all parts
of the country, it has been an-
nounced. The movement will be call-
ed the First Russian Seminar and
fv-y effort will be made to give the
members an unprejudiced insight in-
to conditions, past. present and fu-1
Propaganda of all kinds will be en-
tirely avoided, according to the travel
organization in charge of making the
arrangements. Experienced Ameri-
can authorities will accompany the
group and give talks to the members
from time to time on such topics as
history, economics, politics, art, ar-
;hitecture, and religion, all in their
relation to the places being visited.
An advisory committLee of promin-
= =Amerans in various fields has
:ecn formed and includes such names
a Stuart Chase, of New York City;
I rof. Kenneth Conant, Samuel H.
Cross, and Bruce C. Hopper, of Har-
vard University; Henry W. L. Dana,
,i.- Cambridge University; Prof.
Gehorge H. Day, Occidental College;
1"rof. Samuel N. Harper, of the Uni-
versity of Chicago; Harry I. Harri-
man, president of the United States
Chamber of Commerce; Grove Pat-
terson, editor of the Toledo Blade;
Prof. D. C. Poole, of Princeton Uni-
versity; and many others.
Backers of the trip feel that in
order to really understand conditions
in Russia it is necessary to see de-
velopments at first hand.
Accident Victims Are
Doing Well, Is Report
Frederick Chapman, '34E, 523 Hill
St., and George Peterson, 517 Hill
St., who were badly injured Tuesday
night in an automobile accident on
Packard road, were reported as do-
ing well at the University Hospital
last night.
Officials stated that Peterson, who
had undergone an operation, was
"resting quite well' while Chapman
was "doing as well as might be ex-
pected."
The accident occured when Peter-
son attempted to pass a truck driven
by Lloyd Northrupp. His car left the
road, struck a tree, and turned over
a number of times. The injured men
were taken to the hospital by North-
rupp.

British Delegation To Consult With Experts
Before Meeting Roosevelt On Debt Problem

LONDON, Feb. 22.-(/P)-Before a
British government delegation sets
sail for America to discuss the war
debts problem with President Roose-
velt, the members will consult, not
only with Montague Norman, Gover-
nor of the Bank of England, but also
with the money masters of the little
island.
The money masters are very few
in number and are all in London-
chairman of the "Big Five." This
term probably means very little to
Americans, but everybody in Great
Britain understands it. The "Big
Five" are the five huge banking in-
-1itutions which tower over all the
rest of the banks of the country.
There are, of course, other banks,
which have deposits which would be

considered big in any country, but
they are not in the same class with
the "Big Five."
The total deposits for the "Big
Five," reckoning the pound sterlingS
at par, reach $;,598,799,731. This is
about one-half the amount deposited
in the 6,150 national banks in the
United States and about four times
the deposits with the Federal Reserve
Banks.
There is nothing in the United
States, not even the Federal Reserve
bank and its branches, even approx-
imating to the "Big Five." They cover
England and Wales like a glove.,
Some even extend their operation-.
into Scotland and North Ireland.
Perhaps the most remarkable of

the five money masters, whom the
government delegation will consult, is
Reginald McKenna, chairman of the
Midland bank. He is 70, practiced at
the bar, became one of the leading
politicians of the liberal party and
successively held cabinet posts of
President of the Board of Education,
First Lord of the Admiralty, Home
Secretary and finally, Chancellor of
the Exchequer during the crucial war
years of 1915-16. As such, he intro-
duced the great war loan of 1915. Hi
budget, introduced in the House of
Commons in September, 1915, wa:;
hailed as a masterly attempt to deal
with the unusual financial cbnditions
arising out of the war. Since he be-
c ame head of the bank, he has , r-
saken politics.

taken politics.

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It's Smart to be at the Union
-anda Lot of Fun
for a One Buck Tax!
DON LOOMIS' UNION BAND
Tal Talbot,.. and a Real Crowd

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ic igan Union Danc

Saturday 9 -12

Friday 9-1

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SITTING BY THE FIRE
MAY BE ALL RIGHT
But when Friday and Saturday
roll 'round you'll want to be at the
League. The music of MIKE, FALK 'S
BAND . .. smooth entertainment . . .
featuring, this week-end, dancing
by SALLY PIERCE, '35, MARIE HEID,
35, and NAN DIEE3LL, '35 . .
Lighting that's different.., and right
. . . so, this week-end, dance where
your friends are dancing . . . at the
League.
If your stub is here, come
around . . . 18545, 18558, 1
19720, 19736, and 19827.

i !

ialf Pound Pure, Sweet
ESTLE BARS
Almond or Plain
Special 15c

$1.00
PROBAK BLADES
10's
Special 69;

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i

C alkins-Fletcher' s
ANNUL 0DA FOUNTAIN
THURSDAY, FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Every year Calkins-Fletcher hold an annual soda fountain festival to a-quaint our new customers with our splendid soda fountain service.
Modern equipment, carefully compounded flavors, plus trained soda f ountain employees assure you the highest quality at all times.
Bring a friend! Enjoy one of our smooth malted milks-made with mild bittersweet chocolate, rich creamy ice cream, fresh dairy milk, thor-
oughly blended with Horlick's malted milk. Topped with heavy whipped cream and served with wafers. We serve your friend free! Large
delicious sundaes, shakes-in other words any of our high grade and tempting ice cream dishes or liquid refreshments are served two for one,

For the
Price of

I
'7--,
+ C ,

2 For the3
Price of

TRY A WOLVERINE SUNDAE TODAY

, r

A Real Treat - Rich Vanilla Ice Cream floating in mild
Bittersweet Chocolate - a dash of fresh chopped nuts -
Topped with rich sweet whipped cream -
A read Maraschino Cherry to climax . . .. . . . . .

15c

, °
,

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