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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 04, 1933 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-06-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1933 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Temperatures In
Classrooms Are
Judged Correct
Dr. Gates Does Extensive
Research In Humidity
' Study On Campus
Effects Are Noted
Poorest Conditions Found
In Engineering Shops
And R. O. T. C. Quarters
By DAVID G. MACDONALD
Temperature conditions in the
classrooms of the University of
Michigan are exceptionally good, ac-
cording to a report prepared by Dr.
Lloyd R. Gates, instructor in hygiene
and public health, based on research
work carried out last winter on the
campus.
Because it has been noticed by the
Health Service that there has always
been a high rate of respiratory in-
fections among students during the
winter months, it was decided to
determine in a scientific manner the
- temperature conditions of the class-
rooms. Seventy-two locations were
selected as representative of a cross-
section of the rooms where the great-
est number of .tudents would be af-
fected. Each building was repre-
sented by at least one classroom, and
an average of four trips was made
to each one throughout the winter
under varying outside temperature
conditions.
Tests were made with a swing
psy'chrometer to determine relative
humidity and a Bureau of Standards
thermometer to determine tempera-
ture. The thermostats in the various
places were also checked as were
conditions of air motion and the
number of windows open.
Effects Of Overheating
The effects of overheating are
shown in recent studies made at
Harvard and Pittsburgh, where over-
heating was acute. More than 90 out
of 100 students became restless and
irritable. They complained of head-
aches, palpitation of the heart, in-
flamed and sore eyes, and a feeling
of weight on the chest was noted.
Their voices suffered, it being an ef-
fort to speak. Dizziness and confu-
sion followed, and a weakness and
a dragged-out feeling was experi-
enced.
Studies in the research laboratory
of the American Society of Heating
and Ventilating Engineers have in-
dicated the serious direct physiologi-
cal effects of extreme overheating as
recorded by changes in body tem-
perature, pulse rite, respiratioiin and
metabolism. The commission has
established the fact that exposure to
high temperature with subsequent
exposure to chill produces a moist
and distended but anemic condition
of the nasal mucosa which is pre-
sumably highly favorable to microbic
invasion. Overheating and chill in-
creases susceptibility, while habitual
exposure to high atmospheric tem-
perature leads to chronic atrophic
rhinitis.
Ideal Temperatures
Finally it has been demonstrated
that overheating has a direct and
important effect on the performance
of physical work. The commission
brought out the fact that 15 per
cent less work was performed at 75
degrees Fahrenheit than at 68 de-
grees Fahrenheit, with 50 per cent
relative humidity and no air move-
ment; while at 86 degrees wtih 80
per cent relative humidity, the de-
crease -amounted to 28 per cent, as
compared with 68 degrees and 50

per cent relative humidity.
In the Michigan classrooms the
ideal temperature to be obtained
with the relative humidity of 30.36
per cent was found to be 72.17 de-
grees. The average of the actual
temperature as shown by the official
theromemeter was 73.22 degrees
Fahrenheit. With the temperature
only one degree higher than that
recommended for body comfort, it is
seen that a close watch is kept on
temperature in University buildings.
The few exceptions of high tem-
peratures are those in the R. O. T. C.
headquarters and the old Engineer-
ing Shops, which run as high as 110
degrees Fahrenheit in the basements,
due to steam pipes and a nearby un-
derground heat tunnel.

Prominent Alumnus

EXAMINATION
SCH'EDULE

Group
D
K
O
G
A
Q
P
N
C
J
I
R
E
F
M
H
L

Date
Saturday
Saturday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Thursday
Friday
Friday
Saturday
Saturday
Monday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday

of Exm.

a. m.
p. M.
a. M.
P. M.
a. m.
p. m.
a. m.
p. M.
a. M.
P. Mn.
a. Mn.
). Mn.
a. in.
p.m.
a. M.
a. m.

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

3
3
5
5
6
6
7
7
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8
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12
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13

-Associated Prxess Photo
Among the University's most prom-
inent alumni abroad is Edgar Ansel
Mowrer, '13, Berlin correspondent for
the Chicago Daily News. Mr.
Mowrer's book, "Germany Turns the
Clock Back," caused a furore in Ger-
many when it was -published in this
country and a subsequent unsuccess-
ful attempt was made to oust him
as president of the Berlin Foreign
Correspondents Association.
Students Make Up
Dramatic Company
Five Michigan students and a
number of students from the Carne-
gie Institute of Technology school
of drama will compose a stock com-
pany which will play this summer,
opening July 10, at Schroon Lake,
N. Y., Adirondacks summer resort.
The members of the stock com-
pany from the University are Fran-
ces Manchester, '34, chairman of
this year's Junior Girls Play and star
of many Play Production vehicles;
Vivian Cohen, '33, star of Play Pro-
duction's "Hedda Gabler" and the
Hillel Players' "Dybbuk;" Paul Wer-
mer, '33M, star in "Anna Christie"
and "The Dybbuk;" and Herbert Mil-
liken, '33, Comedy Club star.
Morton Frank, '33, business man-
ager of many Play Production plays,
will be the business representative of
the company. S. Sylvan Simon, '35L,
assistant to the director of the Uni-
versity broadcasting Service and for
five yars student director of the
Hillel Players, will direct the produc-
tions.

X Each course in Group X may
be examined at, any time
mutuallyagreed upon by
class and instructor.
Other courses not carrying groupI
letters will be examined as follows:

Class
Mon.
Tues.
Elem.I
Mon.
Mon.
Pol. Sc

es
11 a.m.
11 a.m.
Fr., Speech;
3 p.m.
8 a.m.
ci. 2, 52, 108

Elem. Math; Soc.

Tues
Mon.
Tues.
Mon.
Tues.
Ger. 1,
Mon.
Mon.
Tues.
Tues.
Tues.

3 p.m.
10 a.m.
10 a.m.
9 a.m.
9 a.m.
2, 31, 32
1 p.m.
2 p.m.
2 p.m.
8 a.m.
1 p.m.

Date of Exam.
June 3 a.im.
June 3 p.m.
31, 32. June 5 a.m.
June 5 p.m.
June 6 a.m.
Span. 1, 2, 31, 32.
June 6 p.m.
51, 132f
June 7 a.m.t
June 7 p.m.
June 8 a.m.
June 8 p.m.
June 9 a.m.
June 9 p.m.
June 10 a.m.
June 10 p.m.
June 12 a.m.
June 12 p.m.
June 13 a.m.
June 13 p.m.

Franz Molnar,
Noel Coward's
Plays Realistic
(Con inued from Page 3)
at the directing field. He did, how-
ever, probably to pride himself on his
versatility. But he only made one ex-
cursion into the field of production.
He found his leading man refused
to learn the lines as they were writ-
ten, his prima donna threw a tem-
peramental fit becauseshe couldn't
make her customary up-center first
entrance, the choruses fell down
more times than they stood up. So
Molnar tore up directing script,1
threw it into the auditorium; paidl
off the choruses, stage-help, and
hangers-on; and went away for an
unmitigated rest cure somewhere on
the south Mediterranean.
The result was a glittering comedy
at the expense of chief-actors, lead-
ing ladies, composers, property-men,
playwrights, collaborators, and fam-
ily men; the result was "The Play's
The Thing." A playwright, Turai,
who looks surprisingly like Molnar
himself, was the chief character and
deus-ex-machina of the play.
Coward was invited down tothe
country for a quiet week-end by a
leading and old English actress. He
ran into a perfect hot bed of "arti-
ness," and was so embarrassed by
some of the freedom of expression
the household took upon itself, that
he fled to the bathroom where he
wrote (in a built-in tub) the first
draft of "Hay Fever."
If the play is in any manner of the
truth, the week-end must have been
a very lively one. However, allowing
for poetic imagination, there must
have been a great deal of truth in
it, for "Hay Fever" enraged the first
audiences that saw it. They recog-
nized in Coward's "Judith Bliss"
their favorite actress, and were hurt
at Coward's treatment of her.
Thanks! Boys,
Thianks!.
For the wonderful business
with which you have favored
Lis. It has been a real pleasure
to be of service to you.
ENJOY THAT VACATION

Beca use--

A inal

We want to create brisk action!
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We want you to know our values!

SUITS

$24,50

Values to $50.00

$3450

Courses listed below will be exam-
ined as follows:

Ed.
Ed.
Ed.
B.
B.
B.
B.
B.

A 1,
B 20,
C 1,
Ad. 102,
Ad. 152,
Ad. 162,
Ad. 202,
Ad. 122,

Wed.
Mon.
Sat.
Wed.
Mon.
Sat.
Mon.
Tues.

p.m.,
p.m.,
a.m.,
a.m.
p.m.
a.m.
a.m.
p.m.

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

7
5
10
7
5
10
5
6

LINEN SUITS
Special Lot .. $9 85
Values to $23.50

KING GEORGE HAS BIRTHDAY
LONDON, June 3.- W) -King
George V observed his sixty-eighth
birthday anniversary today but
rheumatism in a shoulder prevented
him from attending a glittering mili-
tary pageant in his honor.

Repertory Players Gaining In
National Recognition Annually

and we will
Fall with
possible.

greet you in the
the best values

.._- ,

(Continued from Page 3)
of the United States to study theatre
arts and to participate in the pro-
ductions.
These people are not of the
common stage-struck amateur type
who have been bitten by the act-
ing bug, but are people interested
in the theatre as an art. Many are
important teachers of drama in
schools and colleges throughout the
country; some are directors, design-
ers, technicians in community thea-
tres; many are professional actors;
all come to Ann Arbor for a summer
of serious work in a live theatre.
Critics and others who have wit-
nessed the summer productions of
the Michigan Repertory Players have
been unanimous in their comments
concerning the intelligence and en-
thusiasm of the work. Thomas Wood
Stevens, serving on the National Lit-
tle Theatre Conference, said, "The
summer program at the University
of Michigan is an outstanding event
of its kind in the United States."
Serious-minded peop:e of the the-
atre profession believe that the fu-
ture of the American drama lies in
the work of local theatre organiza-
tions, in organizations like the Mich-
igan .Repertory Players.
In considering nie importance of a
company like this one, it is an item
of significance to remember that the
group composes a college enterprise.
Located at an educational center, as
it is, connected definitely as it is
with the currciulum in drama, it has
a better chance of giving the public
well-acted theatre than the average
poor-benighted little theatre which
depends for its subsistence on the

whim of certain society matrons. A
strict objectivity is maintained in the
organization of the players, and all
work -in the company is a matter of
strictest competition.
Authorities feel that if the future
of the American theatre lies in the
work of organizations like the Michi-
gan Repertory players, then the na-
tional recognition afforded this group
should make Michigan proud and
Ann Arbor theatregoers eager.

WALK A FEW STEPS
AND SAVE DOLLARS
Tom Corbett
Young Men's Shop
116 East Liberty St.

A $3.00 Value.

SHIRTS'

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Sizes 7 to 8 2/--al wid ths.

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This shoe sold originally for $10.50

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SESSION'

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A$4.50 Value. $345
N ECKWEAR
Former Values $1.00to $1.50. ,NOW 68c
SPECIAL LOT OF CASHMERE SPORT TIES
$1.50 and $2.50 Values - 98c

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A SATIRE ISA
MAN WHO IS 50%
GOAT

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Graduation Gifts
Line-A-Day Diary with Lock. . $1.00
Fotofolio - The New Photo Album $1.00
Leather Zipper Brief Pocket ... $1.98
Don't forget FATHER'S DAY next Sunday!
Greeting Cards for 411 Occasions

THIS sort of thing has gone too
far! When asked what product
we get from whales, Bill Boner said,
"Little whales."
Let's take action at once: Get him
a good pipe and a tin of good tobacco.
We all know a pipe smooths out the
wrinkles, clears the mind for its best
thinking. And we all know what
smoking tobacco goes best in a good
pipe. For a recent investigation
showed Edgeworth to be the favorite
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before you buy, write Larus & Bro.
Co., 120 S. 22d St.,
Richmond, Va., for

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SUMMER SPECIALS
Complete Suits of Underwear.. . .. .... .$2.45
Polo Oxford Shirts........ . .. . . . . .$5.00

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