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June 04, 1933 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1933-06-04

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"

,I

THE IMICHIGAN DAILY,

- SUNDAY, JUNE 4,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student 'Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Associa-
tion and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER OF 'THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
trot otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication ofE pecial
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postrpaster General."
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by
mrall, $4.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives,
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylston Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago. National Advertising Service, Inc., 11 West 42nd
St., New York, N. Y.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR........THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR................C. HART SCHAAF
CITY EDITOR....................BRACKLEY SHAW
SPORTS EDITOR...................ALBERT H. NEWMAN
WOMEN'S EDITOR.......... ..........CAROL J. HANAN
NIGHT EDITORS: Ralph G. Coulter, William G. Ferris,
John C. Healey, Robert B. Hewett, George Van Vleck,
Barbara Bates, Eleanor Blum, Lois Jotter, Marie
Murphy, Margaret Phalan.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Donald R. Bird,
Arthur W. Carstens, Sidney Frankel, Marjorie Western.
REPORTERS: Caspar S. Early, Thomas Groehn, Robert
D. Guthrie, Joseph L. Karpinski, Manuel Levin, Irv.ng
P. Levitt, David G. Macdonald, S. Proctor McGeachy,
John O'Connell. George I. Quimby, Floyd Rabe, Mitchell
Raskin, Richard Rome, Adolph Shapiro, Marshall D.
Silverman, L. Wilson Trimmer, William F. Weeks.
Marjorie Beck, Frances Carney, Dorothy Gies, Jean HEtn-
mier, Florence Harper, Marie Heid. MargaretHiscock,
~Eleanor Johnson, Hilda Laine, Kathleen Maclntyre,
Josephine McLean, Marjorie Morrison, Mary O'Neill,
Jane Schneider, Ruth Sonnanstine, Margaret Spencer
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER................BYRON C. VEDDER
CREDIT MANAGER ................HARRY R. BEGLEY
WOMIN'S BUSINESS MANAGER.......Donna C. Becker
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Advertising, W.Grafton Sharp
Advertising Contracts, Orvil Aronson; Advertising Serv-
ice, Noel Turner- Accounts, Bernard E. Schnacke; Cir-
culation, Gilberin.E. Bursley; Publications, Robert E.
Finn.~

plied to the Council who were responsible for the
so-called coup d'etat of several weeks ago andC
thus indirectly for the new Council. The Social-X
ists never waged any campaign for a new Council.t
Had they been active in past elections, had they
made any attempt to elect men who were in-
terested in a responsible and powerful council,
they might have grounds for complaint. However,1
in reviewing elections and nominations of the past1
five years, I find no trace of any attempt on the
part of this group to foster a movement for better
student government. Not until after some one elhe7
has done something, do they come into the pic-
ture. This also applies to the other groups men-
tioned by Mr. Orr.
Mr. Orr states that no Council will be in a posi-
tion to take over real responsibility from the Ad-
ministration until it has earned the confidence
and respect of the students, administration and
Regents. Granted that the old Council had none.
Why not give the new one a chance to earn it?
This confidence cannot be gained in three days.
The new Council is on trial for a year, according
to the administration, and from the personnel of
the group, one would judge that it will be a suc-
cess. If not, another plan will be substituted. The
groups which Mr. Orr calls the Independents and
Socialists have never participated to any great ex-
tent in any Council elections. Considering that in
the last election, three hundred votes would have
won for any ticket, why did not this two-thirds
of the student body which Mr. Orr finds unrep-
resented place a ticket in the field? For two-thirds
of the student body means five thousand students,
and only 100 signatures have been required in the
past on petitions for nomination. It is obvious that
these groups have had no interest in the Council
until it has been made a body which does com-
mand respect and confidence. As I said previously,
if they had been active in any way, they would
have just cause for complaint.
"We have"heard the inside story, how certain
Sphinx and Triangles got together and lobbied the
Daily, how the Daily put through our new gift,"
writes Mr. Orr. This is utter nonsense. The coup
d'etat previously referred to was engineered by
men who were n3ot connected with any of the
three organizations mentioned. They had nothing
at stake. They were not running for office, nor
did they expect to. They were interested solely in
a responsible and efficient student government,
and for that reason they acted as they did.
In conclusion, Mr. Orr's parting shot is "Imag-
ine the new Council starting a Co-operative book
store!" If we add the word successful to that sen-
tence, I should like to remind Mr. Orr that people
who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones.
.-Oscar.,

"lush" production we are giving "The Lady of the
Camelias" with Miss Jane Cowl: It is a New York
production, if ever a festival presented one. At
the admission prices it is rather fantastic.
To begin with there is the cast which includes
Jane Cowl, Rollo Peters, the perfect romantic
pair in the American theatre-as well as Tom
Powers, Robert Loraine, ano Lewis Martin. Rela-
tively minor roles are filled by-such distinguished
players as Katherine Wick Kelly, Doris Rich,
Francis Compton, and Edward Lewis. After all, if
Miss Cowl is to be brought to Ann Arbor she must
be given artists and physical backgrounds worthy
of her station in the theatre. This is being done,
if I may say so, with a vengeance.
The cast includes fifty-three players. The cos-
tumes, in the bouffant period of 1846, have all
been especially created by Madame Helene Pons
of New York City for the Ann Arbor perform-
ance. Madame Pons designed Miss Cooper's cos-
tumes last spring for "Peter Ibbetson," which gives
a small idea of what an entire cast will look like
in such creations. As it is my belief that the next
theatre is ging to be the romantic theatre, "The
Lady of the Camelias" has dived into the whole
panoply of crystal chandeliers, dripping wax
candles, camelias, lilacs-everything that goes
with the rococo period of the play; a play, in-
cidentally, that will always stand as the great love
story of the theatre.
The five acts go from Marguerite's boudoir to
her garden at Auteuil to the famous gambling ca-
sino in Paris. Completely different settings are
being created for each act. Miss Cowl's so-called
"Reinhardt System" of lighting calls for a com-
pletely new installation of lighting from New York
in the Mendelssohn theatre. The entire produc-
tion, in fact, is so elaborate-with incidental
music throughout every scene, with the dinner
party scene, the gambling scene and all the rest
of the pageant-as to leave me, at least, in the
role of manager fairly gasping,
"Twelfth Night" is equally in the grand manner,
with six players of Miss Cowl's original cast, in-
cluding Walter Kingsford as Sir Toby Belch, Joyce
Carey as Olivia, Lewis Martin as The Clown, and
Jerry Bowman-the masculine replica of Miss
Cowl-as Viola's twin brother, Sebastian. The en-
tire "Book" setting for "Twelfth Night" has been
brought on from New York. As a matter of fact,
this is the only possible way to produce Shake-
speare. One cannot risk a single piece of miscast-
ing in such thistledown comedy.

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ASSISTANTS: John Bellamy, Gordon Boylan, Allen Cleve-
land, Jack Efroymson, Fred Hertrick, Joseph Hume,
Allen Knuusi, Russell Read, Lester Skinner, Robert
Ward, Meigs W. Bartmess,.Willian B. Caplan, Willard
Cohodas, R. C. Devereaux,nCarl J. Fibiger, Albert
2Gregory, Milton Kramer, John Marks, John I. Mason,
Jlohn P. Ogden, Robert Trimby, Bernard Rosenthal,
Joseph Rothbard, Richard Schiff, George R. Williams.
Eliigabeth Aigler, Jane Bassett, Beulah Chapman, Doris
Gimmy,' Billie Griffiths, Catherine McHenry, May See-
fried, Virginia McComb, Meria Abbot, Betty Chapman,
Lillain Fine, Minna Giffen, Cecile Poor, Carolyn Wose.
SUNDAY, JUNE' 4, 1933
Chapter' s
End...
B ANK HOLIDAY, beer back, new
form of student government, foot-
ball team wins conference and national titles,
students 'starving, Rose Bowl furore, election, no
east side beer, investigation of drinking conditions,
proposed reduction in University budget..-.
The past year has been an eventful one in Ann
Arbor. At times, it has hit hard. We have cursed
the times, some of us have even suffered acutely.
All of us have at least experienced some incon-
venience. But now that we look back at it, it seems
as though we have passed through great adven-
ture. We have seen things happen of a tremen-
dously important nature, historically. What we
have suffered has been more or less amusing be-
cause it has been novel.
The depression made its first real impression
here during the past school year. One morning we
woke up to find our checks no good, our bank
closed, our cash practically gone, and our credit
wobbly. A feeling of disaster descended upon us.
Then, we saw a powerful man take the reins of
government in Washington, a great president now
With only a few months of his term completed. We
have joined in the upward pull with him and we
have seen his policies bearing fruit.
We have joined in the rejoicing at the return of
beer. We have imbibed freely of the new beverage.
Now,- we come to the end of this chapter. Some
of us will return next year. We are hoping for
better times then. We shall be glad that 1932-33 is
gone but it is one year that we shall never forget.
We will tell our grandchildren about it.
Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disregard-
ed. The names of communicants will, however, be re-
garded as confidential upon request. Contributors are
asked to be brief, confining themselves, to less than
300 words if possible.
1N DEFENSE OF THE
NEW STUDENT COUNCIL
To The Editor:
I should like to be permitted to'answer some
of the questions raised by Mr. Orr's letter to The
Daily yesterday anent the Student Council. Mr.
Orr's main objection, I gathered, was that the
Council was not representative enough of all the
students and he advocated a proportional repre-
sentation elective plan instead of the present ex-
officio system.
In the past. the Council was elective. This has
been recognized as one of the main faults of the
organization due to the campus political situation.
In adopting the ex officio plan, it was hoped to
get away from the political maneuvering, and to
obtain men and women who would not have to

MISNOMER
BY HENDERSON
To The Editor-
I have just seen another poster advertising
"Camille" as a great romance, and would like to
ask how we may be expected to have any faith in
Mr. Henderson when he is so patently ignorant of
theatre history and terminology. Doesn't he know
that 1852, when "Camille" ("La Dame Aux Ca-
melias") was first produced, is regarded as one
of the theatre's most significant dates because it
marks the advent of realism? Doesn't he know
French romanticism went into abeyance ten years
before this, not to re-emerge for more than half
a century?
Mr. Henderson has had article after article
published in The Daily, in which he has con-
descendingly given his audience inside informa-
tion on the theatre and its people. His printed
Dramatic Festival programs conspicuously and
repetitiously inform us that he is Director. Mr.
Henderson's favorite pose is that of a torchbearer
bringing the manna of culture to a backward
province. Personally, we believe he would do well
to return to school for a year or two and acquire
a little of the education he so clearly needs.
-Drama Student.,
DRAMATIC FESTIVAL,
DARKENED BALLROOMS
To The Editor:
This noon I lunched with eleven women, all
but two of whom are connected with the Uni-
versity of Michigan and interested in its welfare.
The conversation during the greater part of the
luncheon raged around the subject of the Dra-
matic Festival; without exception those women
expressed regret and disapproval that our enjoy-
ment of the fine artists whom Mr. Henderson
brings us each year should be diminished, and
that our appreciation of their intelligent work,
and Mr. Henderson's, should be obscured by the
vulgarity of such plays as "Springtime for Henry."
Moreover, ouit is an educational institution, in-
tent on training the intelligence and taste of a
large group of immature persons. Whether they
wish it or not, we owe these young people some-
thing better than Henrys and his kind, however
smart they may be conversationally.
But so long as we confine ourselves to deploring
at private luncheons only, the plays shown at
Lydia Mendelssohn, the songs sung at the Mich-
igarl Theatre, foreign propaganda through the Art
Cinema League, sensuous dancing in darkened
ballrooms, etc., etc., we shall continue to enjoy at
Michigan good lower-middle class, bad taste, and
like Mark Twain's complaint of the weather,
everybody will talk about it, but nobody will do
anything.
Won't somebody please do something-besides
talk. -H. G. K.
The Theatre
FINAL APOLOGIA
By ROBERT HENDERSON
In "Design for Living" the Dramatic Season is
in its most successful production; on the opening
night, in my opinion, the company gave the finest
performance we have presented with the possible
exception of "The Merchant of Venice" this winter
in Detroit with Blanche Yurka. For those who
wish to find it, "Design for Living" is among the
most important plays of the modern theatre. Cas-
ually, it is a brilliant comedy, written with the

It seems to me that with Violet Kemble-Cooper
in "The Mad Hopes," wildly, delightfully modern,
the festival closes with a coiplete gamut of the-
atre emotions. Certainly no more expert farceur
is in the American theatre than Miss Cooper. Her
performance in "The Vinegar Tree," proved that.
It is true that, with the exception of a single
matinee, every 'performance to date during the
season has been completel: sold out with extra
chairs added , and people begging for standing
room. It is also true, however, that seats are avail-
able and have been available for all performances.
There is no such thing as a completely "sold-out"
house until the final rush at the box-office win-
dow just before the performance. It is simply a
part of wisdom, in order to scure choice seats, to
order as far in advance as possible. One conces-
sion which has helped the situation is the per-
formance on Sunday evening, June. 18, of
"Twelfth Night" with Miss Cowl. This will mean
that seniors and their friends and parents will
be able to see Miss Cowl even if other perform-
ances are overcrowded.
It seems pathetic to turn people away from the
festival productions, especially when they drive
from out-of-town. I would make a humble plea
for more performances next season, at least for
a full five weeks. Perhaps all good things will
come in time.
Screen Reflections
I
Four stars means extraordinary; three stars very
good; two stars good; one star just another picture;
no stars keep away from it.
AT THE MAJESTIC
"REUNION IN VIENNA"
* ***JOHN BARRYMORE AND
DIANA WYNYARD PLAY WELL
Again we have the beautiful Diana Wynyard in
the role of a charming, alluring young woman
rather than in her customary part of a sweet,
faithful wife or mother. And the result, as in
"Rasputin," is most pleasant.
In the part of Elena, played by Lynn Fontanne
in the stage version, Miss Wynyard presents a
most convincing and enjoyable, performance. Ru-
dolf, former Hapsburg arhduke, is played by
John Barrymore with equal success. The combina-
tion is such as to assure the success of the screen
version of the racy, sophisticated tale of the re-
turn ffom exile of the dashing, romantic Rudolf
and his grand attempt to recapture the illusions
which once surounded his affair with Elena.
Elena, now married to a famous psychiatrist
(extremely well played by Frank Morgan), is not
to be easily won by her former lover, despite his
appearance as the same carefree, egotistic mem-
ber of the royal family which she once knew and
loved.
The situation then, is typical of many other
modern, ultra-smart plays. Impossible perhaps,
but none the less enjoyable.
The underlying seriousness of the situation
arises from the conflict between the husband and
doctor, "the sublimity of the intellectual" and Ru-
dolf, "the quintessence of the emotional."
Robert Sherwood has provided his play with
brilliant lines in keeping with' this startling se-
quence. Minor characters are well-cast and the
subtle in comedy situations is apparent, so that
at no time does the scene become incongruous.
So, in a grand play, two marvelous stars perform
beautifully. No more could be asked.
-E. J. P.
Instead of needles and thread, life guards at the
New Jersey beaches will need vulcanizing kits if
what we have read about this summer's bathing

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Sheers & Crepes
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41

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Now Is the Time to Sa
AU R VI R!
The past few months have been to say the least "Rough."
We offer our sincere appreciation to the student body
for your fine attitude and spirit of co-opertaion. YOUSE
GUYS AND YOUSE GALS HAVE BEEN SWELL.
Of course. We will pay CASH for your USED Books
WHETHER THEY ARE USED HERE AT MICHI-
GAN OR NOT -Bring all the books you have and we
will do our utmost to satisfy -WITH CASH.
Don't Forget Our College-End Sale Continues Until the
Close of School-JUST HUNDREDS OF REAL
BUYING OPPORTUNITIES.
PLEASANT GRADES! PLEASANT VACATION I

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